Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  1    |           investments in physical and intellectual capital. There is a significant
  2   II,     5.  5.  3|                over several months of intellectual, social and language functioning.
  3   II,     8.Acr    |            Prevention of Blindness~ID~Intellectual Disabilities~LFS~Labour
  4   II,     8.  1.  1|        disease state, but people with intellectual disability or any other
  5   II,     8.  2.  1|                                8.2.1. Intellectual disability~ ~ ~
  6   II,     8.  2.  1|               8.2.1.1. Introduction~ ~Intellectual disability has emerged as
  7   II,     8.  2.  1|             it is still the case that intellectual disability is sometimes
  8   II,     8.  2.  1|           terms, although people with intellectual disabilities may incur mental
  9   II,     8.  2.  1|           AAMR, 2002).~ ~Persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) are frequently
 10   II,     8.  2.  1|        Although it is well known that intellectual disability is a neglected
 11   II,     8.  2.  1|               WHO, 2007).~People with intellectual disabilities have made marked
 12   II,     8.  2.  1|          identified among people with intellectual disabilities, not to mention
 13   II,     8.  2.  1|          related to the prevalence of intellectual disability are not common
 14   II,     8.  2.  1|           data about individuals with intellectual disabilities who are known
 15   II,     8.  2.  1|             those with mild levels of intellectual disability or young children
 16   II,     8.  2.  1|              In this way, people with intellectual disabilities can be recognised
 17   II,     8.  2.  1| Health-related data about people with intellectual disabilities have amassed
 18   II,     8.  2.  1|              their registers who have intellectual disabilities, and may thus
 19   II,     8.  2.  1|           2007).~Further, people with intellectual disabilities have until
 20   II,     8.  2.  1|             the health of people with intellectual disabilities drawn from
 21   II,     8.  2.  1|              Inclusion of people with intellectual disabilities within national
 22   II,     8.  2.  1|               a sample of people with intellectual disabilities, either through
 23   II,     8.  2.  1|     identified specifically as having intellectual disability: rather, such
 24   II,     8.  2.  1|             the health of people with intellectual disabilities in Europe.
 25   II,     8.  2.  1|            provision for persons with intellectual disabilities, current service
 26   II,     8.  2.  1|            the website.~ ~Definitions~Intellectual disability is defined by
 27   II,     8.  2.  1|              average level of general intellectual functioning”. Both ICD10
 28   II,     8.  2.  1|     definitions note that deficits in intellectual functioning must be accompanied
 29   II,     8.  2.  1|          emphasizing deficits in both intellectual functioning and in adaptive
 30   II,     8.  2.  1|               American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (
 31   II,     8.  2.  1|           whose current definition of intellectual disability is ‘a disability
 32   II,     8.  2.  1|       significant limitations both in intellectual functioning and in adaptive
 33   II,     8.  2.  1|                1994).~ ~Prevalence of intellectual disability in adults has
 34   II,     8.  2.  1|     Prevalence of severe and profound intellectual disability (SPID) in Finland
 35   II,     8.  2.  1|       associated with the presence of intellectual disabilities in both developed
 36   II,     8.  2.  1|          their countries, people with intellectual disabilities may be said
 37   II,     8.  2.  1|              2005). Among people with intellectual disabilities, however, some
 38   II,     8.  2.  1|         children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities (Emerson and
 39   II,     8.  2.  1|              Risk factors~ ~Causes of intellectual disability~A number of factors
 40   II,     8.  2.  1|             number of factors causing intellectual disability have been discovered,
 41   II,     8.  2.  1|             causes are still unknown. Intellectual disability can start anytime
 42   II,     8.  2.  1|          children, the cause of their intellectual disability is not known.
 43   II,     8.  2.  1|           most common known causes of intellectual disability are Down syndrome,
 44   II,     8.  2.  1|            pregnancy. Other causes of intellectual disability are related to
 45   II,     8.  2.  1|                 Still other causes of intellectual disability do not happen
 46   II,     8.  2.  1|             hypothyroidism, can cause intellectual disability and other problems
 47   II,     8.  2.  1|           Health risks of people with intellectual disability~Lack of comparable
 48   II,     8.  2.  1|         information about people with intellectual disabilities impedes monitoring
 49   II,     8.  2.  1|              disparities, people with intellectual disabilities typically encounter
 50   II,     8.  2.  1|             needs, but as people with intellectual disabilities rely on health
 51   II,     8.  2.  1|    intervention for participants with intellectual disabilities when compared
 52   II,     8.  2.  1|             inequalities.~People with intellectual disabilities are traditionally ‘
 53   II,     8.  2.  1|         disparities among people with intellectual disabilities. The observed
 54   II,     8.  2.  1|            experienced by people with intellectual disabilities, reluctance
 55   II,     8.  2.  1|           Horwitz, 2001). People with intellectual disabilities are doubly
 56   II,     8.  2.  1|         beliefs regarding people with intellectual disabilities (Scheepers
 57   II,     8.  2.  1|         experienced by Europeans with intellectual disabilities.~In the United
 58   II,     8.  2.  1|        British children, finding that intellectual disability was a significant
 59   II,     8.  2.  1|         children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities.~In a survey
 60   II,     8.  2.  1|            survey of 1542 adults with intellectual disabilities living in supported
 61   II,     8.  2.  1|           factors such as severity of intellectual disability, age and location.~ ~
 62   II,     8.  2.  1|            and policies~ ~People with intellectual disabilities comprise an
 63   II,     8.  2.  1|             the health of people with intellectual disabilities should be considered
 64   II,     8.  2.  1|      conditions for which people with intellectual disabilities are at greater
 65   II,     8.  2.  1|            prevention~ ~Some cases of intellectual disability can be prevented
 66   II,     8.  2.  1|            Children diagnosed with an intellectual disability are most successful
 67   II,     8.  2.  1|          totally preventable cause of intellectual disability. Women should
 68   II,     8.  2.  1|          particularly ones related to intellectual disability, such as phenylketonuria,
 69   II,     8.  2.  1|           risk of having a child with intellectual disability. Folic acid,
 70   II,     8.  2.  1|          helped to reduce the rate of intellectual disability related to prematurity.~
 71   II,     8.  2.  1|       conditions that often result in intellectual disability. Amniocentesis
 72   II,     8.  2.  1|           programmes may also prevent intellectual disability and other consequences
 73   II,     8.  2.  1|               the child will not have intellectual disability. It is also important
 74   II,     8.  2.  1|              likely to be affected by intellectual disability and other birth
 75   II,     8.  2.  1|      specifically target persons with intellectual disabilities are effective.
 76   II,     8.  2.  1|              outcomes for people with intellectual disabilities. Preparation
 77   II,     8.  2.  1|           health needs of people with intellectual and other disabilities is
 78   II,     8.  2.  1|            who work with persons with intellectual disabilities in 14 participating
 79   II,     8.  2.  1|     effectively with persons who have intellectual disabilities. Models of
 80   II,     8.  2.  1|               support for people with intellectual disabilities. Arguably,
 81   II,     8.  2.  1|            disabilities). People with intellectual disabilities are very likely
 82   II,     8.  2.  1|             the health of people with intellectual and other disabilities is
 83   II,     8.  2.  1|       information about citizens with intellectual disabilities. Health indicators
 84   II,     8.  2.  1|              between persons who have intellectual disabilities and the general
 85   II,     8.  2.  1|               related to persons with intellectual disabilities across countries.~
 86   II,     8.  2.  1|        lifelong health of people with intellectual disabilities (Scheepers,
 87   II,     8.  2.  1|               vigorously. People with intellectual disabilities in Europe may
 88   II,     8.  2.  1|     middle-aged and older people with intellectual disabilities are likely
 89   II,     8.  2.  1|               the part of people with intellectual disabilities will have an
 90   II,     8.  2.  1|           evidence that patients with intellectual disabilities in general
 91   II,     8.  2.  1|              residence of people with intellectual disabilities and the forms
 92   II,     8.  2.  1|             the health of people with intellectual disabilities: outcomes of
 93   II,     8.  2.  1|              after 1 year. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research 50 (
 94   II,     8.  2.  1|            exercise among adults with intellectual disabilities in supported
 95   II,     8.  2.  1|          Northern England. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research 49,
 96   II,     8.  2.  1|         children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities. American Journal
 97   II,     8.  2.  1|         children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities in Britain:
 98   II,     8.  2.  1|               replication. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research 51,
 99   II,     8.  2.  1|        Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities 18, 295-304.~
100   II,     8.  2.  1|              working with people with intellectual disabilities in the UK.
101   II,     8.  2.  1|        Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 17, 85-90~
102   II,     8.  2.  1|             faced by Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities. Journal of
103   II,     8.  2.  1|        Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 18, 113-121~
104   II,     8.  2.  1|          health status of people with intellectual disabilities in the southeastern
105   II,     8.  2.  1|              disorders in adults with intellectual disability. Journal of Intellectual
106   II,     8.  2.  1|   intellectual disability. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 42 (
107   II,     8.  2.  1|  Understanding the Change to the Term Intellectual Disability. INTELLECTUAL
108   II,     8.  2.  1|              Intellectual Disability. INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES
109   II,     8.  2.  1|              disparity in people with intellectual disabilities: A report from
110   II,     8.  2.  1|               the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disabilities. Journal of
111   II,     8.  2.  1|               of Policy & Practice in Intellectual Disabilities 2(3/4), 249-
112   II,     8.  2.  1|               problems of people with intellectual disabilities: the impact
113   II,     8.  2.  1|            indicators for people with intellectual disabilities. The method
114   II,     8.  2.  1|            Pomona Project. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 51,
115   II,     8.  2.  1|              problems in persons with intellectual disabilities. British Medical
116   II,     8.  2.  1|            indicators for people with intellectual disabilities: A European
117   II,     8.  2.  1|            indicators for people with intellectual disabilities: Pomona Project.
118   II,     8.  2.  1|             of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 2, 3-4, 260-
119   II,     8.  2.  1|            Resources for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities WHO, Geneva~
120   II,     8.  2.  1|       Organisation (2000). Ageing and Intellectual DisabilityImproving Longevity
121   II,     9        |              a distinctive pattern of intellectual deficits that become apparent
122   II,     9        |       including reductions in general intellectual functioning and academic
123   II,     9.  1.  1|               have moderate to severe intellectual impairment. Other children
124   II,     9.  1.  1|         normal cognition or only mild intellectual impairment. As shown in
125   II,     9.  1.  2|              a distinctive pattern of intellectual deficits that become apparent
126   II,     9.  1.  2|       including reductions in general intellectual functioning and academic
127   II,     9.  2.  3|               type (through physical, intellectual, or behavioural causes).
128  III,    10.  2.  1|              a distinctive pattern of intellectual deficits that become apparent
129  III,    10.  2.  1|       including reductions in general intellectual functioning and academic
130   IV,    12.  4    |          professional qualifications; Intellectual property rights and access
131   IV,    13.  7.  2|    entrepreneurship, applications and intellectual property.~ ~Over the past
132  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|     insecticide~insecticides~insomnia~intellectual~intentional~interaction~