Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1   II,     5.  1.  1|           and also salt-preserved foods are causes of this cancer.
  2   II,     5.  1.  1|          of this cancer in women. Foods containing dietary fibre,
  3   II,     5.  1.  1|           Allergy~In adults, main foods responsible for about half
  4   II,     5.  1.  1|   associated with the exposure to foods containing wheat, barley
  5   II,     5.  2.  5|      origin), a reduced intake of foods rich in preformed cholesterol,
  6   II,     5.  2.  5|       intake of salt and of salty foods, an increased intake of
  7   II,     5.  2.  5|         vegetables and fibre rich foods are the first step of the
  8   II,     5.  2.  5|          through a regular use of foods supplemented in phytosterols,
  9   II,     5.  3.  4|           and also salt-preserved foods are the causes of this cancer.
 10   II,     5.  3.  4|          of this cancer in women. Foods containing dietary fibre,
 11   II,     5.  4.  6|         children, of energy dense foods and sugar-sweetened drinks;~·
 12   II,     5.  5.  3|         least a number of healthy foods will be developed and marketing
 13   II,     5.  5.  3|      eating; dont forbid certain foods; make mealtime pleasant;
 14   II,     5.  5.  3|          food groups and specific foods. Mov Disord 14(1):21-27.~
 15   II,     5.  9. FB|           milk proteins and solid foods for at least four months
 16   II,     5. 10.  1|     database, 2006), although few foods are responsible for the
 17   II,     5. 10.  1|        most frequently identified foods causing FA shows a geographical
 18   II,     5. 10.  1|          presence of allergens in foods by cross-contamination in
 19   II,     5. 10.  1| susceptible consumers about which foods they should avoid eating.
 20   II,     5. 10.  2|          2 Most common allergenic foods in Europe~ ~As follow-up
 21   II,     5. 10.  2|         was asked to identify the foods, food components and food
 22   II,     5. 10.  2|  consumers. The major sensitising foods identified were cow’s milk,
 23   II,     5. 10.  2|      vegetables (celery and other foods of the Ombelliferae family),
 24   II,     5. 10.  2|    Finally, allergic reactions to foods are often inconsistently
 25   II,     5. 10.  2|            but not restricted to, foods for which labelling is mandatory
 26   II,     5. 10.  2|         of IgE-mediated FA to the foods that are responsible for
 27   II,     5. 10.  2|           other common allergenic foods will be extracted from the
 28   II,     5. 10.  2|          evaluation of allergenic foods for labelling purposes (
 29   II,     5. 10.  2|           across Europe for those foods.~ ~ ~ ~
 30   II,     5. 10.  3|            2004). In adults, main foods responsible for about half
 31   II,     5. 10.  3|   associated with the exposure to foods containing wheat, barley
 32   II,     5. 10.  6|         identifying the offending foods responsible for the majority
 33   II,     5. 10.  6|    detection of food allergens in foods that could increase sensitivity
 34   II,     5. 10.  6|      labelling statements only to foods that actually present an
 35   II,     5. 10.  6|           affect allergenicity of foods or food components, and
 36   II,     5. 10.  6|         in the market (e.g. novel foods, genetically modified organisms,
 37   II,     5. 10.  7|          evaluation of allergenic foods for labelling purposes.
 38   II,     5. 10.  7|          Scientific Committee for Foods (SCF) (1995): Report on
 39   II,     5. 10.  7|           on adverse reactions to foods and food ingredients. Reports
 40   II,     5. 10.  7|          Scientific Committee for Foods, Thirty-seventh series,
 41   II,     5. 14.  3|           difficulty to chew hard foods (objective measure) have
 42   II,     6.  3.  6|    production and distribution of foods) have led to the situation
 43   II,     9        |         consumption of fibre-rich foods, green vegetables and fruits (
 44   II,     9.  3.  1|       abundance of ‘energy densefoods and drinks which promote
 45   II,     9.  3.  1|         appetite control by these foods, drinks and their frequency
 46   II,     9.  4.  4|         consumption of fibre-rich foods, green vegetables and fruits (
 47   II,     9.  5.  3|       families. They choose which foods to purchase and decide which
 48   II,     9.  5.  4|         and health claims made on foods.~ Reference A6-0122/2006 :
 49  III,    10.  1.  1|        high-fat, low-carbohydrate foods, which have a weak effect
 50  III,    10.  2.  1|          of consumption of sugary foods and tobacco use. A more
 51  III,    10.  2.  1|           estimation of intake of foods, nutrients and potentially
 52  III,    10.  2.  1|           fortification of staple foods like bread. In addition,
 53  III,    10.  2.  1|       almost exclusively found in foods of animal origin so that
 54  III,    10.  2.  1|         encompass a wide array of foods such as seafood, meat, pulses,
 55  III,    10.  2.  1|           fat and added sugars in foods, increased saturated fat
 56  III,    10.  2.  1|     eating a variety of different foods to maintain the required
 57  III,    10.  2.  1|         intrinsically good or bad foods: each has its part to play
 58  III,    10.  2.  1|         balance, but clearly some foods are better suppliers of
 59  III,    10.  2.  1|          assortment of affordable foods available throughout the
 60  III,    10.  2.  1|     frozen or chilled convenience foods and special nutritionally
 61  III,    10.  2.  1|    special nutritionally modified foods. The contribution of the
 62  III,    10.  2.  1|           high-quality nutritious foods, specifically fortified
 63  III,    10.  2.  1|       also the clear labelling of foods with nutritional content.~ ~
 64  III,    10.  2.  1| vegetables, fruit and other plant foods (Agudo et al, 2002), dairy
 65  III,    10.  2.  1|      consumes abundant fibre-rich foods such as fruit and vegetables
 66  III,    10.  2.  1|   nutrition education mostly as~· foods intended for use by individual
 67  III,    10.  2.  1|         not expressed entirely as foods).~ ~It is important to emphasize
 68  III,    10.  2.  1|        ideally be provided by the foods and amounts of foods recommended
 69  III,    10.  2.  1|          the foods and amounts of foods recommended in the food-based
 70  III,    10.  2.  1|      food-based guidelines;~· the foods that are consumed by individual
 71  III,    10.  2.  1|      recommended intake levels.~· Foods make up diets and are more
 72  III,    10.  2.  1|          the nutritional value of foods.~· Food components may have
 73  III,    10.  2.  1|  allowance and give room for more foods, including discretionary
 74  III,    10.  2.  1|           including discretionary foods. No unanimous conclusion
 75  III,    10.  2.  1|   nutrition and health claims for foods (European Council, 2006a)
 76  III,    10.  2.  1|       used to categorise nutrient foods as eligible (or not) to
 77  III,    10.  2.  1|        for nutrition labelling of foods as “better for you” products
 78  III,    10.  2.  1|      advertising and marketing of foods.~ ~There is a wide range
 79  III,    10.  2.  1|       certain other substances to foods. The aim is to ensure the
 80  III,    10.  2.  1|    minerals which may be added to foods. Annex II is a list of the
 81  III,    10.  2.  1|    minerals which may be added to foods. Annex III is a list of
 82  III,    10.  2.  1|           substances whose use in foods is prohibited, restricted
 83  III,    10.  2.  1|         Annex II, may be added to foods.~ ~Vitamin and mineral substances
 84  III,    10.  2.  1|        use of substances added to foods or used in the manufacture
 85  III,    10.  2.  1|        used in the manufacture of foods under conditions that would
 86  III,    10.  2.  1|       certain other substances to foods.~ ~Food supplements are
 87  III,    10.  2.  1|   substances that can be added to foods for particular nutritional
 88  III,    10.  2.  1|           nutritional purposes in foods for particular nutritional
 89  III,    10.  2.  1|         and health claims made on foods. Official Journal L 404 ,
 90  III,    10.  2.  1|       certain other substances to foods.~Official Journal L 404 ,
 91  III,    10.  2.  1| vegetables, fruit and other plant foods in the European Prospective
 92  III,    10.  4.  2| consequences~Growing~Ready-to-eat foods~Food-born viruses (e.g.
 93  III,    10.  4.  2|         the safety and quality of foods. Due to reasons related
 94  III,    10.  4.  2|        the relevance of different foods and animal species as sources
 95  III,    10.  4.  2|         of different types of RTE foods examined, typically very
 96  III,    10.  4.  2|  Substances deliberately added to foods~ ~Food additives~Many foods,
 97  III,    10.  4.  2|       foods~ ~Food additives~Many foods, for flavour,~smell, colour,
 98  III,    10.  4.  2|          EU standards~for various foods~ ~ ~Exposure reduced by~
 99  III,    10.  4.  2|          standards for~dioxins in foods and~animal feed~ ~ ~In 1998/
100  III,    10.  4.  2|   acrylamide findings detected in foods in Sweden. In some cases
101  III,    10.  4.  2|        specific starch-containing foods such as potato crisps, crispbread,
102  III,    10.  4.  2|          of acrylamide-containing foods. In principle, the so-called
103  III,    10.  4.  2|         also from water and other foods. Nitrate is also formed
104  III,    10.  4.  2|          least four months. Solid foods should not be introduced
105  III,    10.  4.  2|       residues legally allowed in foods. The measure of acute dietary
106  III,    10.  4.  2|      legal residue levels through foods, as originally intended,
107  III,    10.  4.  2|         genomes.~ ~GMOs and novel foods~ ~Novel foods are foods
108  III,    10.  4.  2|           and novel foods~ ~Novel foods are foods and food ingredients
109  III,    10.  4.  2|           foods~ ~Novel foods are foods and food ingredients that
110  III,    10.  4.  2|        the authorisation of novel foods and novel food ingredients.~ ~
111  III,    10.  4.  2|         novel food ingredients.~ ~Foods commercialised in at least
112  III,    10.  4.  2|           the Regulation on Novel Foods on 15 May 1997, are on the
113  III,    10.  4.  2| protection of human health, novel foods must undergo a safety assessment
114  III,    10.  4.  2| authorised for marketing.~ ~Novel foods or novel food ingredients
115  III,    10.  4.  2|           equivalent” to existing foods or food ingredients (as
116  III,    10.  4.  2|          Risk-benefit analysis of foods” and for “the identification
117  III,    10.  4.  2|     health benefit assessments of foods, food ingredients and nutrients.
118  III,    10.  4.  2|     January 1997 concerning novel foods and novel food ingredients.
119  III,    10.  4.  2|         and health claims made on foods. Official Journal of the
120  III,    10.  4.  2|       certain other substances to foods. Official Journal of the
121  III,    10.  4.  2|           nutritional purposes in foods for particular nutritional
122  III,    10.  4.  2|         Risk-benefits analysis of foods: methods and approaches”
123   IV,    12.  2    |      origin), a reduced intake of foods rich in preformed cholesterol,
124   IV,    12.  2    |       intake of salt and of salty foods, an increased intake of
125   IV,    12.  2    |         vegetables and fibre rich foods are the first step of the
126   IV,    12.  2    |          through a regular use of foods supplemented in phytosterols,
127   IV,    12. 10    |           the permissibly kind of foods, being disposed to children
128   IV,    12. 10    |     Decision, the trans lipids of foods are restricted.~ ~ Many
129   IV,    12. 10    |         concerning the hygiene of foods in compliance with the EU
130   IV,    12. 10    |    controlling the circulation of foods which contain genetic modified
131   IV,    12. 10    |         the codes of practice for foods products mkt to children
132   IV,    13.  2.  3|           constituents of certain foods that elicit greatly differing