Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  3    |       general they are economically active and fulfil and important
  2    I,     2.  4    |       social protection reforms and active inclusion policies have
  3    I,     2.  4    |             balanced, comprehensive active inclusion strategies is
  4    I,     2.  5    |         associated health impact.~ ~Active inclusion measures, pension
  5    I,     2.  5    |            should stay economically active longer. Together with efforts
  6    I,     2.  5    |         pension systems can promote active ageing by raising employability,
  7    I,     2.  7    |             provision of physically active and environmentally sustainable
  8   II,     4.  1    |         quality of life and support active ageing and employment in
  9   II,     5.  1.  1|       Obstructive Pulmonary Disease~Active and passive cigarette smoking,
 10   II,     5.  3.  7|           portal;~· Manage networks active in cancer research;~· Give
 11   II,     5.  4.  2|             the medical services in active partnership with diabetic
 12   II,     5.  4.  6|           An early diagnosis and/or active detection of previously
 13   II,     5.  4.  8|   prevention strategies: towards an active use of health information,
 14   II,     5.  5.Int|          adolescents in Europe with active epilepsy is 0.9 million (
 15   II,     5.  5.  2|             socially and physically active etc. Further research needs
 16   II,     5.  5.  3|       stigma. Great Britain is very active in establishing national
 17   II,     5.  5.  3|        initiation (Forsgren, 2004). Active epilepsy is defined as having
 18   II,     5.  5.  3|           The overall prevalence of active epilepsy ranges from 3.2
 19   II,     5.  5.  3|            5.5.3.4.3. Prevalence of active epilepsy in Europe~Modified
 20   II,     5.  5.  3|        exceptions for patients with active epilepsy (seizures during
 21   II,     5.  5.  3|            National Level~There are active MS societies in all 27 member
 22   II,     5.  6.  4|      disability in the economically active population can be estimated
 23   II,     5.  8.  1|        noxious agents (e.g. tobacco active and passive tobacco smoking,
 24   II,     5.  8.  4|               5.8.4. Risk factors~ ~Active and passive tobacco smoking
 25   II,     5. 11.  4|        number of young economically active people when compared to
 26   II,     5. 12.  6|           only in a few years time. Active monitoring of clinical practice
 27   II,     5. 14.  2|          per 100,000 population) of active dentists, dental hygienists,
 28   II,     5. 14.  2|   technicians.~Numerator: Number of active dentists and other oral
 29   II,     5. 15.  5|           organizations now play an active and instrumental role in
 30   II,     6.  3.  1|             affect the economically active population. Of the main
 31   II,     6.  3.  3|            in the EU receive highly active anti-retroviral therapy (
 32   II,     6.  3.  4|             people infected develop active TB. HIV infection increases
 33   II,     7.  5    |             Focal persons should be active members of the WHO focal
 34   II,     8.  1.  5|       policies which facilitate the active inclusion of people with
 35   II,     8.  1.  5|          2006-2007)6 focused on the active inclusion of people with
 36   II,     8.  2.  1|   behaviours that will lead to more active, healthy lifestyles and
 37   II,     9        |          age groups, girls are less active than boys and the gender
 38   II,     9        |          Portugal with only 25 % of active elderly (Volkert, 2005).
 39   II,     9.  2.  3|           is insidious. The WHO has active programmes on violence (
 40   II,     9.  2.  4|          age groups, girls are less active than boys and the gender
 41   II,     9.  3.  1|            of people in Europe with active epilepsy is 0.9 million
 42   II,     9.  3.  3|          the proportion of sexually active 15-year-old people who report
 43   II,     9.  3.  3|    multi-sectorial approach and the active involvement of the community.~ ~
 44   II,     9.  3.  3|              percentage of sexually active, unmarried adolescents who
 45   II,     9.  4.  3|             people who are sexually active may be at risk for HIV and
 46   II,     9.  4.  4|          Portugal with only 25 % of active elderly (Volkert, 2005).
 47   II,     9.  4.  5|        Public polices which promote active citizenship within the EU
 48   II,     9.  4.  5|          allow older people to stay active and productive for a longer
 49   II,     9.  4.  5|          European region;~· The WHO Active Ageing Policy Framework;
 50   II,     9.  5.  3|           for girls. The absence of active role models may negatively
 51   II,     9.  5.  3|             2007).~ ~Girls are less active than boys across all countries
 52   II,     9.  5.  3|            the playground space for active games, girls tend to prefer
 53  III,    10.  1.  1|            to second hand smoke and active smoking are closely linked.
 54  III,    10.  1.  1|           King et al, 1997). Highly active children consume a higher
 55  III,    10.  1.  3|  Isabel-Jones J, Bricker JT (1994): Active and passive tobacco exposure:
 56  III,    10.  2.  1|        death and disease in Europe. Active smoking kills over 650,000
 57  III,    10.  2.  1|            health effects caused by active cigarette smoking.~ ~ ~Cancers~
 58  III,    10.  2.  1|          the EU-25 (Pet ~ ~Not only active smoking, but also passive
 59  III,    10.  2.  1|         Burney P (2006): Changes in active and passive smoking in the
 60  III,    10.  2.  1|      greatly enhanced when there is active, but ongoing enforcement
 61  III,    10.  2.  1|          the population, strengthen active outreach to the community,
 62  III,    10.  2.  1|      respondents being sufficiently active in the Netherlands and Germany
 63  III,    10.  2.  1|           likely to be sufficiently active than women and the likelihood
 64  III,    10.  2.  1|          classified as sufficiently active, 2002~ ~The 2002 and 2004
 65  III,    10.  2.  1|         proportion of those who are active twice a week from about
 66  III,    10.  2.  1|          example, the proportion of active 15-year-old boys was 49%
 67  III,    10.  2.  1|           countries, boys were more active than girls, with activity
 68  III,    10.  2.  1|            proportion of physically active children aged 11, 13 and
 69  III,    10.  2.  1| availability of opportunities to be active) (WHO 2006a). Low physical activity
 70  III,    10.  2.  1|      opportunities to be physically active on a daily basis (Gordon-Larsen
 71  III,    10.  2.  1|          them from being physically active. Longer travel distances,
 72  III,    10.  2.  1|     Promoting physical activity and active living in urban environments:
 73  III,    10.  2.  1|            from organized sports to active commuting or outdoor activities.
 74  III,    10.  2.  1|     Promoting physical activity and active living in urban environments:
 75  III,    10.  3.  2|           factor of four times more active metals than Pt/Rh catalysts (
 76  III,    10.  4.  2|  responsible for the peer review of active substances used in EU plant
 77  III,    10.  4.  2|             legal framework for the active monitoring of ruminants
 78  III,    10.  4.  2|           the beginning of 2005, an active monitoring was carried out
 79  III,    10.  4.  2|      international network is under active consideration by the Commission.
 80  III,    10.  4.  2|      occurred four years later when active surveillance proved the
 81  III,    10.  4.  2|    experimental~animals~Approx. 400 active~substances admitted;~maximum
 82  III,    10.  4.  2|      molecules - intrinsically more active at lower doses - together
 83  III,    10.  4.  2|      pesticide residues of about 85 active substances are being monitored
 84  III,    10.  4.  2|            States covered 44 to 631 active substances40. As a rough
 85  III,    10.  4.  2|     comprehensive assessment of the active substances, will establish
 86  III,    10.  4.  2|          for about 250, 300 and 650 active substances, the situation
 87  III,    10.  4.  2|             Harmonised MRLs for all active substances;~· Review programme
 88  III,    10.  4.  2|    substance);~· ANNEXIV deals with active substances for which no
 89  III,    10.  4.  2|             01 mg/kg applies to all active substances not explicitly
 90  III,    10.  4.  2|             risk assessment for all active substances for which temporary
 91  III,    10.  4.  2|          Article 12;~· MRLs for all active substances included in Annex
 92  III,    10.  4.  2|              01/09/2008). About 170 active substances to be assessed;~·
 93  III,    10.  4.  2|   substances to be assessed;~· each active substance included or not
 94  III,    10.  4.  2|     deleting MRLs; for inclusion of active substances in Annex IV to
 95  III,    10.  4.  2|        about 80.000 samples and 190 active substances for assessing
 96  III,    10.  4.  2|       Article 32 ;~· peer review of active substances.~ ~Within the
 97  III,    10.  4.  2|       approach of evaluation of the active substances:~ ~· first: a
 98  III,    10.  4.  2|               status: evaluation of active substances.~ ~The immediate
 99  III,    10.  4.  2|        delivering conclusions on 37 active substances from list 3 to
100  III,    10.  4.  2|        delivering conclusions on 11 active substances from list 4 to
101  III,    10.  4.  2|           assessment or on specific active substances based on questions
102  III,    10.  4.  2|             assess the safety of an active substance and its products.
103  III,    10.  5.  1|       physical activity, physically active transport modes are one
104  III,    10.  5.  1|            strategies to get people active (Shetland Islands Council,
105  III,    10.  5.  1|             to reach high levels of active transport behaviour: in
106  III,    10.  5.  1|     Promoting physical activity and active living in urban environments.
107  III,    10.  5.  3|      working environment, promoting active participation and encouraging
108  III,    10.  6.  3|       challenge requiring much more active investigation in Europe.~ ~
109   IV,    11.  1.  3|         system, or are they more an active demand-side player, in turn
110   IV,    11.  5.  1|        healthcare process requiring active participation from healthcare
111   IV,    11.  5.  5|            be achieved only through active integration of all the actors
112   IV,    11.  6.  4|            purchasing relying on an active (e.g. with explicit performance
113   IV,    12.  2    |              Early diagnosis and/or active detection of previously
114   IV,    12.  2    |      greatly enhanced when there is active, but ongoing enforcement
115   IV,    12.  3    |            Member States and on the active involvement of all relevant
116   IV,    12.  5    |           mandatory surveillance)~- Active Surveillance Measures(e.
117   IV,    12. 10    |         youth to be more physically active.~2003: ACTION PLAN AGAINST
118   IV,    12. 10    |           easier to live a physical active life. Examples: “National
119   IV,    12. 10    |              prohibition of certain active substances in plant protection
120   IV,    12. 10    |    Prevention (HCDCP) (ww r) has an active role in the prevention of
121   IV,    12. 10    |      biggest city in Greece) has an active collaboration with the regional
122   IV,    12. 10    |             Social Protection is an active member of the European Agency
123   IV,    12. 10    |      Healthy adulthood, healthy and active ageing”, includes poverty
124   IV,    12. 10    |           adults who are physically active on at least a moderately
125   IV,    13.  3    |        access to the labour market. Active inclusion and active labour
126   IV,    13.  3    |        market. Active inclusion and active labour market policies are
127   IV,    13.  3    |  marginalised within our societies. Active inclusion and active labour
128   IV,    13.  3    |     societies. Active inclusion and active labour market policies are
129   IV,    13.  6.  2|          decided to become sexually active or fears they may be pressured
130   IV,    13.  7.  3|          safety of care, facilitate active participation of patients,
131   IV,    13.  8    |        volunteers, a key element of active citizenship. In addition,