Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1   II,     4.  2    |                larger than mortality by lung cancer and other smoking
  2   II,     5.  1.  1|                and physical activity.~ ~Lung cancer: smoking is a primary
  3   II,     5.  1.  1|           smoking is a primary cause of lung cancer, although pollution
  4   II,     5.  1.  1|                  Geographic patterns of lung cancer incidence and mortality
  5   II,     5.  1.  1|                al, 2005). Although male lung cancer incidence is decreasing
  6   II,     5.  1.  1|               all European macro-areas, lung cancer remains the first
  7   II,     5.  1.  1|                 a risk factor promoting lung cancer is increasing, but
  8   II,     5.  3.  1|        selection of major cancer sites: lung cancer, still being the
  9   II,     5.  3.  3|       colorectal (ICD-9 codes 153,154), lung (ICD-9 code 162), female
 10   II,     5.  3.  4|                and physical activity.~ ~Lung cancer: smoking is a primary
 11   II,     5.  3.  4|           smoking is a primary cause of lung cancer, although pollution
 12   II,     5.  3.  4|                  Geographic patterns of lung cancer incidence and mortality
 13   II,     5.  3.  4|                al, 2005). Although male lung cancer incidence is decreasing
 14   II,     5.  3.  4|               all European macro-areas, lung cancer remains the first
 15   II,     5.  3.  4|                 a risk factor promoting lung cancer is increasing, but
 16   II,     5.  3.  5|           standard) by sex B) Women~ ~ ~Lung Cancer (ICD-9 162)~In 2006,
 17   II,     5.  3.  5|             experienced the peak of the lung cancer epidemic in men,
 18   II,     5.  3.  5|                 16b).~ ~Figure 5.3.13a. Lung cancer (ICD9 162) standardized
 19   II,     5.  3.  5|             2006 A) Men~Figure 5.3.13b. Lung cancer (ICD9 162) standardized
 20   II,     5.  3.  5|               Figure 5.3.14a. Trends of lung cancer (ICD9 162) standardized
 21   II,     5.  3.  5|               Figure 5.3.14b. Trends of lung cancer (ICD9 162) standardized
 22   II,     5.  3.  5|                 Women~ ~Figure 5.3.15a. Lung cancer (ICD9 162) standardized
 23   II,     5.  3.  5|             2006 A) Men~Figure 5.3.15b. Lung cancer (ICD9 162) standardized
 24   II,     5.  3.  5|               Figure 5.3.16a. Trends of lung cancer (ICD9 162) standardized
 25   II,     5.  3.  5|               Figure 5.3.16b. Trends of lung cancer (ICD9 162) standardized
 26   II,     5.  3.  6|                 B) Women~ ~Survival for lung cancer patients remains
 27   II,     5.  3.  6|                was a modest tendency of lung cancer survival improvement
 28   II,     5.  3.  6|                2003).~ ~Figure 5.3.32a. Lung cancer (ICD9 162) age-standardized
 29   II,     5.  3.  6|             1999 A) Men~Figure 5.3.32b. Lung cancer (ICD9 162) age-standardized
 30   II,     5.  3.  6|        colorectal (European mean: 54%), lung (European mean: 12%), breast (
 31   II,     5.  3.  6|              stomach cancer and 11% for lung cancer. Survival for patients
 32   II,     5.  3.  7|        screening for prostate cancer or lung cancer in high-risk subjects
 33   II,     5.  3.  7|                is made for implementing lung or prostate cancer screening.~ ~
 34   II,     5.  8.Acr|              Health Survey~ELF~European Lung Foundation~ERS~European
 35   II,     5.  8.Acr|                 for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease~GP~General Practitioner~
 36   II,     5.  8.Acr|           Practitioner~OLIN~Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden~
 37   II,     5.  8.  1|            inflammatory response of the lung to noxious particles or
 38   II,     5.  8.  1|              rapid deterioration in the lung function, increasing the
 39   II,     5.  8.  2|                peer reviewed journals~- Lung Health in Europe Facts &
 40   II,     5.  8.  2|                  Figures, from European Lung White Book~ edited by European
 41   II,     5.  8.  2|        Respiratory Society and European Lung Foundation.~- European Detailed
 42   II,     5.  8.  2|             emphysematransparency of lung~J43.1~ ~Panlobular emphysema~ ~ ~
 43   II,     5.  8.  2|              unspecified~ ~ ~Emphysema (lung)(pulmonary):~· NOSbullous~·
 44   II,     5.  8.  2|                        emphysema ( J4 )~lung diseases due to external
 45   II,     5.  8.  2|                    airway disease NOSlung disease NOS~ ~ ~ ~
 46   II,     5.  8.  3|            women aged 30-60 with normal lung function at baseline were
 47   II,     5.  8.  3|            Lokke et al, 2006). Abnormal lung function was observed in
 48   II,     5.  8.  3|               prevalence of obstructive lung disease in 40-69 year olds
 49   II,     5.  8.  3|               the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) studies (
 50   II,     5.  8.  3|                2007).~ ~The Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden (
 51   II,     5.  8.  3|                 cardiovascular disease, lung cancer, asthma was found
 52   II,     5.  8.  3|                 ischemic heart disease, lung cancer and asthma were more
 53   II,     5.  8.  3|               self-reported obstructive lung disease.~ ~On these basis,
 54   II,     5.  8.  3|               of COPD. The ERS European Lung White Book reported that
 55   II,     5.  8.  4|            women aged 30-60 with normal lung function at baseline were
 56   II,     5.  8.  4|            Lokke et al, 2006). Abnormal lung function ranged from 4%
 57   II,     5.  8.  5|              reason, chest examination, lung function tests, imaging
 58   II,     5.  8.  5|             politicians is the European Lung White Book, published by
 59   II,     5.  8.  5|          Society (ERS) and the European Lung Foundation (ELF) (European
 60   II,     5.  8.  6|          end-of-life symptom burden for lung cancer and chronic obstructive
 61   II,     5.  8.  6|                p<0.05) than people with lung cancer. Patients with COPD
 62   II,     5.  8.  7|                estimation. Int J Tuberc Lung Dis 2007; 11: 695-702.~ ~
 63   II,     5.  8.  7|         Pulmonary Disease. In “European lung white book – The first comprehensive
 64   II,     5.  8.  7|       obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer in the last 12 months
 65   II,     5.  8.  7|                 for Chronic obstructive lung disease. [http://www.goldcopd.
 66   II,     5.  8.  7|                population. Int J Tuberc Lung Dis 2005; 9: 926-932.~ ~
 67   II,     5.  8.  7|             Report from the Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden
 68   II,     5.  8.  7|           Larsson K (2003): Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden
 69   II,     5.  8.  7|             Report from the Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden
 70   II,     5.  8.  7|               Prevalence of obstructive lung disease in a general population
 71   II,     5.  8.  7|               the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) Study. Chest
 72   II,     5.  8.  7|       Respiratory Health Survey (2005): Lung Function Decline, Chronic
 73   II,     5.  8.  7| proportionalVenn diagram of obstructive lung disease in the Italian general
 74   II,     5.  8.  7|                 Chronic Bronchitis, and Lung Function in Young Adults .
 75   II,     5.  9.Acr|              SAPALDIA~Air Pollution and Lung Diseases in Adults~ ~ ~ ~
 76   II,     5.  9.  2|                5th Framework Program;~- Lung Health in Europe Facts &
 77   II,     5.  9.  2|                  Figures, from European Lung white book edited by European
 78   II,     5.  9.  2|        Respiratory Society and European Lung Foundation;~- Eurostat NewCronos
 79   II,     5.  9.  3|           admissions, 8 patients died. (Lung Health in Europe, 2003 ERJ)~ ~
 80   II,     5.  9.  3|             amounting to €9.8 billion) (Lung Health in Europe Facts &
 81   II,     5.  9.  3|         inpatient care (€ 0.5 billion) (Lung Health in Europe, 2003).~ ~
 82   II,     5.  9.  4|              Study on Air Pollution and Lung Diseases in Adults (SAPALDIA) (Wü ch
 83   II,     5.  9.  4|              associated to a decline of lung function and, in particular,
 84   II,     5.  9.  7|                exposure and tracking of lung function into adult life.
 85   II,     5.  9.  7|                 1999 Feb;25(2):55-67.~ ~Lung Health in Europe (2003):
 86   II,     9        |           Smoking is a primary cause of lung cancer, although pollution
 87   II,     9.  1.  1|          learning disabilities, chronic lung disease, visual and hearing
 88   II,     9.  3.  1|                 excess (Wilkins, 2007). Lung/bronchus cancer is the most
 89   II,     9.  3.  1|           common adult cancers, such as lung and colon cancers, incidence
 90   II,     9.  3.  1|    glucocorticoid steroid treatment for lung disease (Lim & Fitzpatrick,
 91   II,     9.  3.  1|           Smoking is a primary cause of lung cancer, although pollution
 92   II,     9.  5.  4|              diseases among men such as lung cancer (WHA Resolution 60.
 93  III,    10.  2.  1|            cancer*~Trachea, bronchus or lung~Aortic aneurism~Respiratory
 94  III,    10.  2.  1|          Respiratory symptoms, impaired lung function~Breast cancer*~
 95  III,    10.  2.  1|            infant death syndrome (SIDS)~Lung cancer~Pancreas~Atheroschlerotic
 96  III,    10.  2.  1|            symptoms*, asthma*, impaired lung function*~Colon~Hip fractures~ ~
 97  III,    10.  2.  1|                adverse health effects~- Lung~- Mouth and throat: oral
 98  III,    10.  2.  1|            control of asthma~- Impaired lung growth and increased risk
 99  III,    10.  2.  1|               health effects, including lung cancer, COPD and CVD. It
100  III,    10.  2.  1|             strongly linked to COPD and lung cancer and is known to have
101  III,    10.  2.  1|                for cancer of the mouth, lung, and pancreas in male construction
102  III,    10.  3.  1|              significantly the risk for lung cancer. For another physical
103  III,    10.  3.  1|            radon and the development of lung cancer. The Dutch Health
104  III,    10.  3.  1|              100 to 1200 extra cases of lung cancer every year. Most
105  III,    10.  3.  1|              million), 400-700 cases of lung cancer can be ascribed to
106  III,    10.  3.  1|             linear relationship between lung cancer risk and the level
107  III,    10.  3.  1|              study concludes that 9% of lung cancer deaths/year in Europe
108  III,    10.  3.  1|            total of 330 000 deaths from lung cancer/year (Bray et al,
109  III,    10.  3.  1|             known occupational cause of lung cancer, in particular for
110  III,    10.  3.  1|           highest proven cancer burden. Lung cancers in children are
111  III,    10.  3.  1|             radon increases the risk of lung cancer in adulthood. There
112  III,    10.  3.  1|              Radon in homes and risk of lung cancer: collaborative analysis
113  III,    10.  3.  1|             Quesne B, Laurier D (2007): Lung cancer risk associated to
114  III,    10.  3.  1|                Lane R (2007). Radon and lung cancer risk: An extension
115  III,    10.  4.  1|                 impaired development of lung function, and the frequency
116  III,    10.  4.  1|                 bronchial) symptoms and lung function growth in children.
117  III,    10.  4.  1|          symptoms in children and lower lung function at higher air pollution
118  III,    10.  4.  1|               normal development of the lung. Scientists and health-care
119  III,    10.  4.  1|               likely to develop reduced lung function as adults. Estimates
120  III,    10.  4.  1|                that the risk of reduced lung function is doubled in children
121  III,    10.  4.  1|                  In people with chronic lung disease (sthma, COPD)~·
122  III,    10.  5.  2|                 respiratory disease and lung cancer.~ ~For Lithuania,
123  III,    10.  5.  2|              diagnosis for prostate and lung cancer, and that, in general
124  III,    10.  6.  2|               and cancers, particularly lung cancer, are the most important
125   IV,    11.  5.  1|               organs such as the liver, lung and heart, it is the only
126   IV,    11.  5.  1|              the field of liver, heart, lung and tissue transplantation.~ ~
127   IV,    11.  5.  2|    International Registry for Heart and Lung Transplantation: htt Spanish
128   IV,    11.  5.  4|           waiting for a heart, liver or lung transplant usually range
129   IV,    13.  2.  3|             heart diseases,~Depression, lung cancer, diabetes, alcohol-dependency~ ~ ~ ~ ~
130   IV,    13.  7    |                 end-stage renal, liver, lung and heart failure.~ ~