Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2. 10.  1|                 the development of new genetic tests, DNA chip technologies
  2    I,     2. 10.  1|                the professions and the genetic health literacy of the lay
  3    I,     2. 10.  1|                and lifestyles factors, genetic determinants will become
  4    I,     2. 10.  1|             gain new insights into the genetic of fundamental biological
  5    I,     2. 10.  1|               in order to optimise the genetic makeup of crops, e.g. improve
  6    I,     2. 10.  1|               to animal scientists the genetic base of farm animal biology
  7    I,     2. 10.  1|                analysis to dissect the genetic basis of one or more specified
  8    I,     2. 10.  1|               conservation of relevant genetic and biological resources
  9   II,     5.  1.  1|             abdominal fat In case of a genetic susceptibility it is this
 10   II,     5.  1.  1|              old age.~ Type 1 diabetes genetic susceptibility in combination
 11   II,     5.  1.  1|               appetite, and digestion; genetic factor.~ ~· Autism~Controversy
 12   II,     5.  1.  1|          plausible interaction between genetic and environmental risk factors
 13   II,     5.  2.  4|             unhealthy lifestyles and a genetic predisposition (the so-called
 14   II,     5.  2.  4|    physical activity, medical care and genetic and environmental conditions.~ ~
 15   II,     5.  3.  2|       information in support of cancer genetic counselling services for
 16   II,     5.  3.  2|               studies on molecular and genetic epidemiology and on patients’
 17   II,     5.  3.  8|              is being acquired thorugh genetic research and this is changing
 18   II,     5.  3.  8|        knowledge is being acquired via genetic research which is changing
 19   II,     5.  4.  1|                factors combined with a genetic predisposition are involved
 20   II,     5.  4.  1|               A complex interaction of genetic, social and environmental
 21   II,     5.  4.  5|             abdominal fat In case of a genetic susceptibility, this fat
 22   II,     5.  4.  6|        prevention~For Type 1 diabetes, genetic susceptibility combined
 23   II,     5.  5.Int|          combination of psychological, genetic, environmental and social
 24   II,     5.  5.  1|                 Berk et al., 2006) and genetic factors (Currier et Mann,
 25   II,     5.  5.  2|         factors such as age, gender or genetic vulnerability or abnormalities
 26   II,     5.  5.  3|               appetite, and digestion; genetic factor.~ ~As a result, ill
 27   II,     5.  5.  3| multi-factorial pathogenesis including genetic deviations and functional
 28   II,     5.  5.  3|          plausible interaction between genetic and environmental risk factors
 29   II,     5.  5.  3|   abnormalities such as brain tumours, genetic, metabolic or degenerative
 30   II,     5.  5.  3|              that, at least in Europe, genetic susceptibility and the distribution
 31   II,     5.  5.  3|             explained by the differing genetic background, the different
 32   II,     5.  5.  3|               close ethnic origins and genetic composition of the two populations.
 33   II,     5.  5.  3|          probably indicating a similar genetic and environmental background
 34   II,     5.  5.  3|                previous diagnoses. The genetic influence from northern
 35   II,     5.  5.  3|                the population specific genetic susceptibility in increasing
 36   II,     5.  5.  3|            exposures, and/or different genetic susceptibility underlying
 37   II,     5.  5.  3|    investigations of environmental and genetic factors. Acta Neurol Scand
 38   II,     5.  5.  3|               in Ireland, an effect of genetic diversity. J Neurol Neurosurg
 39   II,     5.  5.  3|                Scotland: evidence of a genetic predisposition. J Neurol
 40   II,     5.  5.  3|               is still unknown. Purely genetic forms of Parkinson’s disease
 41   II,     5.  6.  1|          occupation or sports; and (6) genetic, congenital and developmental
 42   II,     5.  6.  3|                in families. One of the genetic components of seropositive
 43   II,     5.  8.  6|            studies on the influence of genetic factors, exacerbations,
 44   II,     5.  9. FB|    multifactorial aetiology, with both genetic background and environmental
 45   II,     5.  9. FB|               it is very unlikely that genetic/hereditary factors could
 46   II,     5.  9.  4|           probably related to multiple genetic and environmental factors.
 47   II,     5.  9.  4|              maybe also an individual, genetic susceptibility. Some data
 48   II,     5. 10.  1|               personal susceptibility (genetic factors). The type and severity
 49   II,     5. 11.  3|              Atopic eczema often has a genetic element that leads to the
 50   II,     5. 11.  3|            skin disorder with a strong genetic basis. The plaque type is
 51   II,     5. 11.  3|          pathogenesis, and a series of genetic susceptibility loci have
 52   II,     5. 11.  3|               epidermolysis bullosa (a genetic form of mechanical blistering
 53   II,     5. 11.  3|           molecular defects underlying genetic skin diseases that may greatly
 54   II,     5. 11.  4|                blistering diseases and genetic diseases such as xeroderma
 55   II,     5. 15.  2|                base of human genes and genetic disorders. It consists of
 56   II,     5. 15.  2|                2007). OMIM lists 5,760 genetic diseases which are rare.
 57   II,     5. 15.  2|           level of knowledge about its genetic origin. When the genes behind
 58   II,     5. 15.  2|                may be split in several genetic diseases.~ ~Orphanet is
 59   II,     5. 15.  2|           Orphanet are not exclusively genetic diseases as for OMIM, but
 60   II,     5. 15.  3|            rare diseases are mendelian genetic disorders and all mendelian
 61   II,     5. 15.  3|            disorders and all mendelian genetic disorders are rare as the
 62   II,     5. 15.  3|                what concerns mendelian genetic disorders, the MIM catalogue
 63   II,     5. 15.  3|       clinicians. The vast majority of genetic diseases are inherited through
 64   II,     5. 15.  3|           feasible. The fact that most genetic diseases mode of inheritance
 65   II,     5. 15.  4|               rare diseases, including genetic diseases, was adopted for
 66   II,     7.  4.  6|                  biological factors or genetic traits (family history of
 67   II,     8.  2.  1|            aetiology of their SPID was genetic or congenital in 51% cases,
 68   II,     8.  2.  1|                cases, acquired in 19%, genetic or acquired in 18%. Among
 69   II,     8.  2.  1|                a child is born include genetic conditions (such as Cri-du-chat
 70   II,     8.  2.  1|                including, for example, genetic predispositions to certain
 71   II,     8.  2.  1|          drinks. Doctors may recommend genetic testing for people who have
 72   II,     8.  2.  1|              inherited disorder allows genetic counselors to help parents
 73   II,     9        |             multiple environmental and genetic factors. For about 15% of
 74   II,     9        |                amenable to prevention. Genetic susceptibility to environmental
 75   II,     9        |               levels of consumption or genetic difference. The consumption
 76   II,     9.  1.  2|                the figures). Many rare genetic disorders are diagnosed
 77   II,     9.  1.  2|        particularly Italy. Diet and/or genetic factors may explain this
 78   II,     9.  1.  2|             multiple environmental and genetic factors. For about 15% of
 79   II,     9.  1.  2|                amenable to prevention. Genetic susceptibility to environmental
 80   II,     9.  1.  2|             some specific risks due to genetic or cultural factors. Measures
 81   II,     9.  1.  2|                mainly oriented towards genetic diseases and towards developing
 82   II,     9.  1.  2|         developing drug treatments for genetic diseases. Full attention
 83   II,     9.  1.  2|               vaccination and specific genetic risks.~ ~f) The phenomenon
 84   II,     9.  1.  2|                Psychosocial aspects of genetic screening of pregnant women
 85   II,     9.  2.  3|              obesity will be caused by genetic or metabolic conditions,
 86   II,     9.  2.  4|               levels of consumption or genetic difference. The consumption
 87   II,     9.  5.  3|               Levels of consumption or genetic difference alone do not
 88  III,    10.  1    |          influenced by factors such as genetic constitution, age, nutrition
 89  III,    10.  1    |           practice (Beaglehole, 2004). Genetic factors, individual physical
 90  III,    10.  1    |              and air pollution~Housing~Genetic Factors~Chemical~Ingestion
 91  III,    10.  1    |          either part of the individual genetic make-up or acquired during
 92  III,    10.  1    |            health determinants such as genetic, physical, psychological
 93  III,    10.  1.  1|              tobacco use, biological / genetic factors influencing susceptibility
 94  III,    10.  1.  1|                social, personality and genetic factors are influential (
 95  III,    10.  2.  4|    Deoxyribonucleic Acid~EGAN~European Genetic AlliancesNetwork~EURORDIS~
 96  III,    10.  2.  4|              health care which regards genetic determinants, besides environmental,
 97  III,    10.  2.  4|                 the development of new genetic tests, DNA chip technologies
 98  III,    10.  2.  4|              the last two decades from genetic disease and inherited genetic
 99  III,    10.  2.  4|          genetic disease and inherited genetic variation to biological
100  III,    10.  2.  4|                 At present the role of genetic susceptibilities and other
101  III,    10.  2.  4|               so-called common complex genetic disorders, often named multifactorial
102  III,    10.  2.  4|               challenges deriving from genetic research in a journal paper
103  III,    10.  2.  4|                collecting data on rare genetic disorders (see Chapter 7
104  III,    10.  2.  4|           allow researchers to examine genetic mutations at the functional
105  III,    10.  2.  4|             profiling;~· the impact of genetic variants on the metabolism
106  III,    10.  2.  4|              in the definitions: from “genetic test” to “genomic variant”
107  III,    10.  2.  4|     International Declaration on Human Genetic Data (UNESCO, 2003) and
108  III,    10.  2.  4|         assurance and harmonisation of genetic testing services in the
109  III,    10.  2.  4|             has shown that the initial genetic exceptionalism and determinism
110  III,    10.  2.  4|          defined as the application of genetic and molecular science to
111  III,    10.  2.  4|         epidemiology, systems biology, genetic epidemiology, toxico-genomics,
112  III,    10.  2.  4|        Scientific Foundation for Using Genetic Information to Improve Health
113  III,    10.  2.  4|         assurance and harmonisation of genetic testing services in the
114  III,    10.  2.  4|            Health: The Applications of Genetic Technology in Disease Prevention.
115  III,    10.  2.  4|                 Church GM (2008): From genetic privacy to open consent.
116  III,    10.  2.  4|           Chanock S, Nieters A (2006): Genetic variation in TNF and IL10
117  III,    10.  2.  4|     International Declaration on Human Genetic Data, 2003, www ~ ~Wellcome
118  III,    10.  2.  5|           function and the increase of genetic instability. Typical body
119  III,    10.  4.  1|            Another important factor is genetic predisposition.~ ~There
120  III,    10.  4.  2|          bacteria, viruses, etc.), the genetic characteristics of which
121   IV,    12. 10    |                protection products and genetic engering.~Federal Institute
122   IV,    12. 10    |                protection products and genetic engering.~Federal Institute
123   IV,    12. 10    |             international regulations.~Genetic Engineering is regulated
124   IV,    12. 10    |            Engineering is regulated by Genetic Engineering Act (Gentechnikgesetz).~
125   IV,    12. 10    |           responsible for the field of genetic engineering/experimental
126   IV,    12. 10    |         medical devices produced using genetic engineering are not only
127   IV,    12. 10    |        European regulations concerning genetic engineering and epizootic
128   IV,    12. 10    |     circulation of foods which contain genetic modified organisms.~o Ministerial
129   IV,    13.  2.  3|                depending on a person’s genetic make-up. Finally, urban