Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  2    |      growing number of humans into contact with pathogens and their
  2    I,     2.  5    |         Many of these jobs involve contact with members of the public —
  3   II,     5.  1.  1|           usually spread by sexual contact. Abnormal cells, derived
  4   II,     5.  1.  1|          moderate exercise, social contact and mental stimulation.
  5   II,     5.  1.  1|       Dermatological diseases~Main contact dermatitis refers to either:
  6   II,     5.  1.  1|         refers to either: irritant contact dermatitis (e.g. frequent
  7   II,     5.  1.  1|          hairdressers) or allergic contact dermatitis, where subjects
  8   II,     5.  3.  4|           usually spread by sexual contact. Abnormal cells, derived
  9   II,     5.  3.  7|          Be a “One stop shop” as a contact interface with industry;
 10   II,     5.  5.  1|          mood disorders have had a contact with formal health services
 11   II,     5.  5.  1|      disorder has been reported to contact health services (Alonso
 12   II,     5.  5.  1|            2):36-41.~ ~L . (2002). Contact with mental health and primary
 13   II,     5.  5.  2|          moderate exercise, social contact and mental stimulation.
 14   II,     5.  5.  3|        first admission to or first contact with psychiatric services
 15   II,     5.  5.  3|         profound lack of affective contact” and “repetitive, ritualistic
 16   II,     5.  5.  3|            hyperactivity, poor eye contact, and hand-flapping. The
 17   II,     5.  9. FB|          through food, airways and contact with the skin or the mucosae.~ ~
 18   II,     5.  9.  4|            n = 966) with no direct contact to agriculture, but living
 19   II,     5.  9.  4|           in children having daily contact with pets, in particular
 20   II,     5.  9.  4|    dermatitis, hay fever, allergic contact eczema) from 2003 to 2006
 21   II,     5.  9.  4|           than those brought up in contact with dirt, animals and other
 22   II,     5. 11.  1|         organ of social and sexual contact. Perhaps the greatest disability
 23   II,     5. 11.  3|     prevalence=3.6%~Mortz C, et al~Contact sensitisation~German adults (
 24   II,     5. 11.  3|         study)~Prevalence=40% (any contact sensitization)~Schäfer T,
 25   II,     5. 11.  3|           in Wales and Scotland.~ ~Contact dermatitis and other eczemas~
 26   II,     5. 11.  3|         exogenous process, such as contact dermatitis which may or
 27   II,     5. 11.  3|      atopic or seborrhoeic eczema.~Contact dermatitis refers to either:~-
 28   II,     5. 11.  3|       refers to either:~- irritant contact dermatitis (e.g. frequent
 29   II,     5. 11.  3|           hairdressers)~- allergic contact dermatitis, where subjects
 30   II,     5. 11.  3|          BOX~Piercing and allergic contact dermatitis~ ~Piercing practices
 31   II,     5. 11.  3|           body, including allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) (CRF Azevedo,
 32   II,     5. 11.  3|           eruptions at the site of contact, secondary eruptions might
 33   II,     5. 11.  3|    European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (ESSCA) linking
 34   II,     5. 11.  3|           a total of 44 (4.6%) had contact allergy to both nickel and
 35   II,     5. 11.  3|       cobalt, whereas 7 (0.7%) had contact allergy to cobalt (B Larsson-Stymne
 36   II,     5. 11.  3|            al, 1997). In Portugal, contact allergy to gold sodium thiosulfate (
 37   II,     5. 11.  3|           induced appears to be by contact with a high concentration
 38   II,     5. 11.  3|        intimate and prolonged skin contact will result in solubilization
 39   II,     5. 11.  3|          new metals as significant contact sensitizers can be the basis
 40   II,     5. 11.  3|          263.~DV Belsito, Allergic contact dermatitis. In: Fitzpatrick'
 41   II,     5. 11.  3|            ear piercing and atopy, Contact Dermatitis, 1994;31:308–
 42   II,     5. 11.  3|     Finland – a multicentre study, Contact Dermatitis, 2005;53:4045.~
 43   II,     5. 11.  3|           allergy in schoolgirls?, Contact Dermatitis,1985;13:289–293.~
 44   II,     5. 11.  3|            Metals. In: Textbook of Contact Dermatitis, RG Rycroft,
 45   II,     5. 11.  3|           of the Nickel Directive, Contact Dermatitis, 2005;52:2935.~
 46   II,     5. 11.  3|       university students in 1995, Contact Dermatitis, 2001;44(4):218-
 47   II,     5. 11.  3|       Mortz, KE Andersen, Allergic contact dermatitis in children and
 48   II,     5. 11.  3|          children and adolescents, Contact Dermatitis, 1999;41:121-
 49   II,     5. 11.  3|         piercing in metal allergic contact dermatitis, Contact Dermatitis,
 50   II,     5. 11.  3|       allergic contact dermatitis, Contact Dermatitis, 1997;36:233–
 51   II,     5. 11.  3|          in North America (NACDG), Contact Dermatitis, 2008,58:101–
 52   II,     5. 11.  3|          regulatory interventions, Contact Dermatitis, 2003; 49:107–
 53   II,     5. 11.  3|                A Bapt a, M Pece o, Contact allergy to gold sodium thiosulfate.
 54   II,     5. 11.  3|  thiosulfate. A comparative study, Contact Dermatitis, 1997;37(2):78-
 55   II,     5. 11.  3|           of pierced earlobes with contact dermatitis: a study using
 56   II,     5. 11.  3|    European Surveillance System of Contact Allergies (ESSCA): results
 57   II,     5. 11.  3|          to any eczema that is not contact eczema or atopic eczema.
 58   II,     5. 11.  3|           was not atopic eczema or contact dermatitis (Johnson, 1978).
 59   II,     5. 11.  3|        prevalence and incidence of contact dermatitis in the general
 60   II,     5. 11.  3| distinguish between endogenous and contact eczema. Younger ages may
 61   II,     5. 11.  3|          ages may also suffer from contact dermatitis and a study in
 62   II,     5. 11.  3|              Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis are also a serious
 63   II,     5. 11.  5|         important part in reducing contact dermatitis. In Denmark for
 64   II,     5. 11.  5|           adopted to reduce nickel contact with the skin to reduce
 65   II,     5. 11.  7|            allergy in schoolgirls. Contact Dermatitis 1985;13:29-48.~ ~
 66   II,     5. 11.  7|           Mennè T (1992): Allergic contact sensitization in an unselected
 67   II,     5. 14.  2|          age surveyed.~ ~b. Dental Contact within the Previous Twelve
 68   II,     5. 14.  3|     Children aged 12 with a dental contact within the previous twelve
 69   II,     6.  3.  3|      infected through heterosexual contact: from 2 314 cases in 1996
 70   II,     6.  3.  3|      infected through heterosexual contact. Heterosexual contact accounts
 71   II,     6.  3.  3| heterosexual contact. Heterosexual contact accounts for the largest
 72   II,     6.  3.  3|           acquired by heterosexual contact were among people originating
 73   II,     6.  3.  4|         and have close and intense contact with sick birds or their
 74   II,     6.  3.  4|          by close person-to-person contact, through respiratory droplets
 75   II,     6.  3.  6|        outdoor swimming and direct contact with infected animals.~The
 76   II,     6.  3.  6|         contaminated water. Direct contact with infected animals and
 77   II,     6.  3.  6|     infected by direct or indirect contact with animals or animal products (
 78   II,     6.  3.  6|      Transmission is through close contact with an infected person,
 79   II,     6.  3.  6|         are infected through close contact with infected animals (sheep,
 80   II,     6.  3.  7|          infected ticks; 2) direct contact or ingestion of water, food,
 81   II,     6.  3.  7|       occupational or recreational contact with water, soil or other
 82   II,     6.  3.  7|     through a bite from, or direct contact with saliva of, an infected
 83   II,     6.  3.  7|            become infected through contact with their excreta. While
 84   II,     6.  3.  7|            to person through close contact with blood or body fluids.
 85   II,     7.  2.  9|           Promotion) are the first contact point for European injury
 86   II,     9.  3.  3|     emotional intimacy, and sexual contact. Sexual behaviours are expressed
 87  III,    10.  1    |   Developmental~Factors~Biological~Contact with non food consumer products~
 88  III,    10.  3.  3|          by close person-to-person contact, through respiratory droplets
 89  III,    10.  3.  3|         are infected through close contact with infected animals (sheep,
 90  III,    10.  4.  2|   processing aids and materials in contact with food; (3) animal health
 91  III,    10.  4.  2|   Community reference lab for food contact materials.~ ~There are also
 92  III,    10.  4.  2|            The legislation on food contact materials provides that
 93  III,    10.  4.  2|          arising from materials in contact with food, such as the migration
 94  III,    10.  4.  2|          and objects that enter in contact with food, manufacturing
 95  III,    10.  4.  4|                            10.4.4. Contact and non-food consumer products~ ~ ~ ~
 96  III,    10.  4.  4|            detailed description of contact dermatitis associated with
 97  III,    10.  4.  5|            bathing, e.g. by dermal contact with water, ingestion of
 98  III,    10.  4.  5|        human health through direct contact, aerosols inhalation and
 99  III,    10.  4.  5|    contaminated food and water, or contact with contaminated soil.
100  III,    10.  5.  3|             lateral epicondylitis, contact dermatitis and carpal tunnel
101  III,    10.  5.  3|         Many of these jobs involve contact with members of the public —
102  III,    10.  5.  3|           the Network has National Contact Offices in 31 countries.~
103  III,    10.  6.  1|        Figure 10.6.1. Frequency of contact to the most contacted child~ ~
104  III,    10.  6.  1|        respect to the frequency of contact between parents over the
105  III,    10.  6.  1|  considering all age groups, daily contact took place between the parent
106  III,    10.  6.  1|           In all EU-countries, the contact was at least several times
107  III,    10.  6.  1|           75% of the cases. Absent contact was rare in all the participating
108  III,    10.  6.  1|            Use of electronic media contact by 15-year-olds in the EU~ ~
109  III,    10.  6.  1|        telephones and internet for contact with peers was common and
110  III,    10.  6.  1|         electronic media for daily contact (59%of the 11 year old girls
111  III,    10.  6.  1|        boys using electronic media contact daily was reported in Denmark (
112  III,    10.  6.  1|             Least electronic media contact was used by Hungarian school
113  III,    10.  6.  1|           Structure, Proximity and Contact. In: Health, Ageing and
114  III,    10.  6.  3|     Chapter 7 (See figure 7.17).~ ~Contact crimes: The three contact
115  III,    10.  6.  3|          Contact crimes: The three contact crimes in the European Crime
116  III,    10.  6.  3|    relatively low for each type of contact crime. Firm conclusions
117   IV,    11.  2.  1|         care is the first point of contact for patients in the health
118   IV,    11.  2.  1|            the health system. This contact may be a general practitioner,
119   IV,    11.  3.  1|      nurses are the first point of contact e.g. the Netherlands, while
120   IV,    12.  1    |           Commission may, in close contact with the Member States,
121   IV,    12. 10    |       Irish citizens.~Patients can contact the NTPF directly.~Only
122   IV,    12. 10    |        established as the national contact point of the European Union
123   IV,    13.  6.  2|            and free first point of contact for a child with a health
124   IV,    13.  6.  2|          accessible first point of contact.~ ~With the onset of puberty
125   IV,    13.  9    |         Work Better, Civil Society Contact Group, available at: htt sp~