Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  3    |        European Union alone, 500 000 girls and women are affected or
  2   II,     5.  5.Int|            considered to be a “young girlscondition.~ ~Dementia:
  3   II,     5.  5.  3|          that 22% of boys and 38% of girls are dissatisfied with their
  4   II,     5.  5.  3|      included). Additionally, 36% of girls and 22% of boys feel dissatisfied
  5   II,     5.  5.  3|      dissatisfied with their weight. Girlsdissatisfaction increases
  6   II,     5.  5.  3|             for 15-year-olds. 18% of girls diet or control their weight
  7   II,     5.  5.  3|             weight and the number of girls increases with age: from
  8   II,     5.  5.  3|              with a higher level for girls (18%) than for boys (8%).
  9   II,     5.  5.  3|         results estimate that 18% of girls control their weight but
 10   II,     5.  5.  3|           women (Gupta, 1995). Young girls and boys follow the social-cultural
 11   II,     5.  5.  3|        Community-Dwelling Adolescent Girls. PEDIATRICS Vol. 114 No.
 12   II,     5. 11.  3|           Group, 2008). In a Swedish girls group (956), a total of
 13   II,     5. 11.  3|              found that 9% of school girls had nickel allergy, with
 14   II,     6.  3.  5|     attention is given to rubella in girls and women).~ ~Polio~ ~Polio
 15   II,     9        |              for babies and/or young girls are an essential continuing
 16   II,     9        |           widespread among boys than girls and rises with age from
 17   II,     9        |     countries the rates for boys and girls are very similar at age
 18   II,     9        |           drinking among 15-year-old girls is especially high in Denmark,
 19   II,     9        |          likely to use cannabis than girls: 22% and 16%, respectively,
 20   II,     9        |             health problem for young girls because of the risk of infertility,
 21   II,     9        |              quite large: 5889% for girls and 6991% for boys. Rates
 22   II,     9        |          Kingdom. On average, 85% of girls and 86% of boys report using
 23   II,     9        |          regions and all age groups, girls are less active than boys
 24   II,     9        |    physical activity for 15-year-old girls, with over 36% meeting the
 25   II,     9.  1.  2|              for babies and/or young girls are an essential continuing
 26   II,     9.  2.  1|          affect boys more often than girls), alcohol consumption, tobacco
 27   II,     9.  2.  1|         health across Europe varies. Girls are more likely than boys
 28   II,     9.  2.  1|             health among 15-year-old girls are higher in Latvia (over
 29   II,     9.  2.  3|        selected EUGLOREH CountriesGirls~ ~Asthma: It is evident
 30   II,     9.  2.  3|             be higher among boys and girls, and to increase slightly
 31   II,     9.  2.  3|              fighting reported among girls (WHO/HSBC, 2004). Bullying
 32   II,     9.  2.  3|              abuse (both of boys and girls), psychological abuse, or
 33   II,     9.  2.  3|             health problem for young girls because of the risk of infertility,
 34   II,     9.  2.  3| significantly younger ages than men. Girls are more likely than boys
 35   II,     9.  2.  3|            consistently higher among girls than boys. The gender gap
 36   II,     9.  2.  3|             a quarter of 11-year-old girls consider themselves to be
 37   II,     9.  2.  3|              over 40% in 15-year-old girls. National variations can
 38   II,     9.  2.  3|              over 50% of 15-year-old girls in Belgium (both Flemish
 39   II,     9.  2.  3|       highest rates of dieting among girls of 15 (almost 30% or over)
 40   II,     9.  2.  3|            their bodies differently. Girls may have a stronger emphasis
 41   II,     9.  2.  3|            of weight (Figure 9.2.2). Girls often perceive themselves
 42   II,     9.  2.  3|           report found that 18.1% of girls who reported only 1-2 family
 43   II,     9.  2.  3|    behaviours, compared with 8.8% of girls who reported having 3-4
 44   II,     9.  2.  4|           widespread among boys than girls and rises with age from
 45   II,     9.  2.  4|     countries the rates for boys and girls are very similar at age
 46   II,     9.  2.  4|           drinking among 15-year-old girls is especially high in Denmark,
 47   II,     9.  2.  4|          likely to use cannabis than girls: 22% and 16%, respectively,
 48   II,     9.  2.  4|             health problem for young girls because of the risk of infertility,
 49   II,     9.  2.  4|              quite large: 5889% for girls and 6991% for boys. Rates
 50   II,     9.  2.  4|          Kingdom. On average, 85% of girls and 86% of boys report using
 51   II,     9.  2.  4|          regions and all age groups, girls are less active than boys
 52   II,     9.  2.  4|    physical activity for 15-year-old girls, with over 36% meeting the
 53   II,     9.  3.  1|         death rates between boys and girls. However, as we move into
 54   II,     9.  3.  1|           than men. While both young girls and boys engage in consensual
 55   II,     9.  3.  1|            engage in consensual sex, girls are more likely than boys
 56   II,     9.  3.  3|              35.7% in England. Among girls, positive responses range
 57   II,     9.  3.  3|             regions more 15-year-old girls than boys declare having
 58   II,     9.  3.  3|         prevails with more boys than girls having had sexual intercourse
 59   II,     9.  3.  3|           Sweden to 89% in Spain for girls (Figure 9.3.3.2). In almost
 60   II,     9.  3.  3|            boys are more likely than girls to report condom use. The
 61   II,     9.  3.  3|           questionnaires to boys and girls over 15 years of age addressing
 62   II,     9.  5.  1|         Furthermore, women and young girls are disproportionately represented
 63   II,     9.  5.  3|            thereby influence health. Girls who reached menarche by
 64   II,     9.  5.  3|            say they are too fat than girls who mature later. Thus,
 65   II,     9.  5.  3|            mature later. Thus, these girls are more likely to engage
 66   II,     9.  5.  3|           and more mature than other girls of the same age, they may
 67   II,     9.  5.  3|           adolescence, the number of girls who drink alcohol weekly
 68   II,     9.  5.  3|          that 26% of boys and 22% of girls in Sweden had been drunk
 69   II,     9.  5.  3|            countries~ ~Figure 9.5.4. Girls who drink any alcoholic
 70   II,     9.  5.  3|              as a result of boredom. Girls especially are attracted
 71   II,     9.  5.  3|           start smoking earlier than girls, smoking rates for girls
 72   II,     9.  5.  3|             girls, smoking rates for girls are overtaking those for
 73   II,     9.  5.  3|            particular for adolescent girls, as their smoking behaviour
 74   II,     9.  5.  3|              be more significant for girls. The absence of active role
 75   II,     9.  5.  3|             may negatively influence girlslong-term decision to participate
 76   II,     9.  5.  3|     Education and Training, 2007).~ ~Girls are less active than boys
 77   II,     9.  5.  3|              space for active games, girls tend to prefer natural areas
 78   II,     9.  5.  3|              if not aggressive. Some girls demonstrate femininity by
 79   II,     9.  5.  3|             are a major deterrent to girls’ and some boysparticipation
 80   II,     9.  5.  4|         diversity of women and young girls’ health-influencing experiences
 81   II,     9.  5.  6|        Bedward J, Williams A (2000): GirlsExperience of Physical
 82   II,     9.  5.  6|              Against Women And Young Girls In The Health Sector. Brussels~ ~
 83   II,     9.  5.  6|              against women and young girls in the health care sector.
 84   II,     9.  5.  6|  physical activity for 7-10 boys and girls. Available at:~htt tm Available
 85  III,    10.  2.  1|       smoking rates between boys and girls is narrower than expected,
 86  III,    10.  2.  1|        Europe. In the Americas, more girls smoke than boys, and there
 87  III,    10.  2.  1|          among boys, and 15.7% among girls. The unexpected increase
 88  III,    10.  2.  1|          cigarette consumption among girls is likely to double the
 89  III,    10.  2.  1|            by 31% of boys and 33% of girls in Ireland, but only 12%-
 90  III,    10.  2.  1|             13% of boys and 5%-7% of girls in France and Hungary. Across
 91  III,    10.  2.  1|    respectively 35%, 40% 41% for the girls vs. 20%, 30% and 35% for
 92  III,    10.  2.  1|             much higher in boys than girls.~ ~Improved dental hygiene
 93  III,    10.  2.  1|           compared to 48 per cent of girls (White et al, 2006). In
 94  III,    10.  2.  1|         however, ranging from 11% of girls and 25% of boys in France
 95  III,    10.  2.  1|             boys in France to 51% of girls and 61% of boys in Ireland
 96  III,    10.  2.  1|           boys were more active than girls, with activity levels declining
 97  III,    10.  2.  1|    prevalence of overweight in Irish girls (27.3%, 9-12 years old) (
 98  III,    10.  2.  1|      proportion of boys (17.0%) than girls (14.3%) being overweight.
 99  III,    10.  2.  1|             27.1 and 22.1%, boys and girls), Spain (boys: 21.3%; girls:
100  III,    10.  2.  1|          girls), Spain (boys: 21.3%; girls: 20.2%) and Austria (boys:
101  III,    10.  2.  1|            and Austria (boys: 19.9%; girls: 15.3%) while the lowest
102  III,    10.  2.  1|              in Belgium (boys: 9.4%: girls: 10.9%), the Netherlands (
103  III,    10.  2.  1|            Netherlands (boys: 11.6%; girls: 8.6%) and Denmark (boys:
104  III,    10.  2.  1|            and Denmark (boys: 12.5%; girls: 10.3%). These data consisted
105  III,    10.  2.  1|          year-old boys versus 24% of girls, and 28% of 15-year-old
106  III,    10.  2.  1|          year-old boys versus 31% of girls, were overweight. Up to
107  III,    10.  2.  1|             year-old and 15-year-old girls (Currie et al, 2004).~ ~
108  III,    10.  5.  2|             a similar prevalence for girls in rural and urban settings (
109  III,    10.  6.  1|          decreases with age for both girls and boys. In general, young
110  III,    10.  6.  1|            group. 77% of 11 year old girls, 65% of 13 year old girls
111  III,    10.  6.  1|            girls, 65% of 13 year old girls and 61% of 15 year old girls
112  III,    10.  6.  1|         girls and 61% of 15 year old girls in the Walloon region report
113  III,    10.  6.  1|           Greece, 96% of 11 year old girls, in Slovenia and the Netherlands,
114  III,    10.  6.  1|      Netherlands, 92% of 13 year old girls, and in Slovenia, 88% of
115  III,    10.  6.  1|         Slovenia, 88% of 15 year old girls report easy communication.
116  III,    10.  6.  1|           Figure 10.6.2. 15-year old girls in the EU having three or
117  III,    10.  6.  1|           Europe and East Europe for girls. Boys are more likely to
118  III,    10.  6.  1|              of the same gender than girls (Currie et al., 2008).~ ~
119  III,    10.  6.  1|              in all age groups among girls than among boys. Of the
120  III,    10.  6.  1|       contact (59%of the 11 year old girls and 44% of boys, 78% of
121  III,    10.  6.  1|               78% of the 13 year old girls and 56% of boys). The same
122  III,    10.  6.  1|            15-year old Danish school girls accounted for 83% and boys
123  III,    10.  6.  1|          Among 11 year old Hungarian girls only 13% had used electronic
124  III,    10.  6.  1|          among 13 year old Hungarian girls 27% and among 15 year old
125  III,    10.  6.  1|          among 15 year old Hungarian girls only 33%. (Currie et al.,