Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  2        |            61%) and foodstuffs and animal fodder (89%) into the EU
  2    I,     2.  2        |            also broadens human and animal exposure to a variety of
  3    I,     2.  9        |         insects, mammals and other animal groups. Climate change has
  4    I,     2.  9        |            the life cycles of many animal groups (phenology), including
  5    I,     2. 10.  1    |        full development, giving to animal scientists the genetic base
  6    I,     2. 10.  1    |           the genetic base of farm animal biology and production.
  7    I,     2. 10.  1    |           generation of additional animal genome sequences may need
  8    I,     2. 10.  1    |           properly exploiting farm animal genomics. These may include
  9    I,     2. 10.  2    |           food and feed additives, animal health, veterinary drugs,
 10   II,     5.  5.  3    |            dietary factors such as animal product intake, herbal tea
 11   II,     5.  9.  4    |      nickel salts, complex plants, animal derivatives). Occupational
 12   II,     5.  9.  4    |        adjuvant potency in allergy animal models. Coarse (2.5-10 microm)
 13   II,     5. 10.  2    |        materials of both plant and animal origin. This search/able
 14   II,     6.  3.  4    |         research purposes, or from animal reservoirs of SARS-CoV-like
 15   II,     6.  3.  6    |         coordination between food, animal and environmental control
 16   II,     6.  3.  6    |            contact with animals or animal products (including milk
 17   II,     6.  3.  6    |        higher in imported and wild animal meat and consumption of
 18   II,     6.  3.  6    |          do not enter the human or animal food chains, and that blood
 19   II,     6.  3.  7    |        seen in relation to certain animal reservoirs. Surveillance
 20   II,     6.  3.  7    |            by rodents; 3) handling animal tissues or fluids or undercooked
 21   II,     6.  3.  7    |            exposure to an infected animal’s urine or contaminated
 22   II,     6.  3.  7    |            the correct disposal of animal carcasses, correct disinfection,
 23   II,     6.  3.  7    |        with saliva of, an infected animal. The disease is fatal as
 24   II,     6.  3.  7    |      spread of disease within wild animal populations. In the last
 25  III,    10.  2.  1    |      exclusively found in foods of animal origin so that vegetarians
 26  III,    10.  2.  1    |           true for products of non animal origin as plants apparently
 27  III,    10.  2.  1    |            eat very low amounts of animal food products are at risk.
 28  III,    10.  2.  5    |      scarce and we have to rely on animal data. A meta-analysis of
 29  III,    10.  2.  5    |           data. A meta-analysis of animal data identified more than
 30  III,    10.  2.  5    |           brain: Some lessons from animal studies of neural plasticity.
 31  III,    10.  3.  1    | ICNIRP-limits established in 1998. Animal studies have not provided
 32  III,    10.  3.  2    |      scarce and we have to rely on animal data. A meta-analysis of
 33  III,    10.  3.  2    |           data. A meta-analysis of animal data identified more than
 34  III,    10.  3.  3    |          do not enter the human or animal food chains, and that blood
 35  III,    10.  4.  2    |         OIE~World Organisation for Animal Health~PAA~Primary Aromatic
 36  III,    10.  4.  2    |          towards biotechnology and animal welfare. As a consequence,
 37  III,    10.  4.  2    |          taking into consideration animal health and welfare, plant
 38  III,    10.  4.  2    |         such as nanotechnology and animal cloning, and the relentless
 39  III,    10.  4.  2    |       chain has been developed: a) animal feed: labelling, feed additives,
 40  III,    10.  4.  2    |        additives, feed hygiene; b) animal health and welfare: reinforcement
 41  III,    10.  4.  2    |          account the protection of animal health and welfare, plant
 42  III,    10.  4.  2    |    Committee on the Food Chain and Animal Health).~ ~The all regulatory
 43  III,    10.  4.  2    |          series of actions against animal diseases that can be transmitted
 44  III,    10.  4.  2    |      contaminants, pesticides, and animal health issues including
 45  III,    10.  4.  2    |          in contact with food; (3) animal health and welfare; (4)
 46  III,    10.  4.  2    |     products or substances used in animal feed; (7) genetically modified
 47  III,    10.  4.  2    |          feeding stuffs;~• food of animal origin and commodities with
 48  III,    10.  4.  2    |            contaminants in food of animal origin.~ ~In addition, Regulation
 49  III,    10.  4.  2(28)|           on products of plant and animal origin and repealing Directive
 50  III,    10.  4.  2    |         cereals), also products of animal origin will be included
 51  III,    10.  4.  2    |         eradication programmes for animal diseases and zoonoses under
 52  III,    10.  4.  2    |        Salmonella in these various animal species and enable the consideration
 53  III,    10.  4.  2    |           lifestyle studies.~ ~For animal health, disease data are
 54  III,    10.  4.  2    |         States to the Commission's Animal Disease Notification system (
 55  III,    10.  4.  2    |   outbreaks of the many infectious animal diseases.~ ~The ADNS is
 56  III,    10.  4.  2    |        authorities responsible for animal health and the Commission
 57  III,    10.  4.  2    |           about outbreaks of these animal diseases in the countries
 58  III,    10.  4.  2    |            outbreaks of contagious animal diseases and enables Member
 59  III,    10.  4.  2    |           outbreak of a contagious animal disease not epi-zoo-tiologically
 60  III,    10.  4.  2    |   notification of these contagious animal diseases.~ ~On the internet
 61  III,    10.  4.  2    |      fulfil its mandate, the World Animal Health Organisation (OIE)
 62  III,    10.  4.  2    |             OIE) manages the world animal health information System,
 63  III,    10.  4.  2    |         notify to the OIE the main animal diseases, including zoonoses.
 64  III,    10.  4.  2    |         widen the dissemination of animal health information, in the
 65  III,    10.  4.  2    |       directly such information.~ ~Animal Health Information for 2005
 66  III,    10.  4.  2    |          from the new WAHID (World Animal Health Database) Interface
 67  III,    10.  4.  2    |    supplied by Member Countries on animal diseases and zoonoses prior
 68  III,    10.  4.  2    |        publication entitledWorld Animal Health”, which also includes
 69  III,    10.  4.  2    |           Control of Transboundary Animal Diseases (GF-TADs) is a
 70  III,    10.  4.  2    |        fight against transboundary animal diseases (TADs), provide
 71  III,    10.  4.  2    |          Warning Systems for major animal diseases.~ ~ ~An important
 72  III,    10.  4.  2    |           4.2.1), in particular of animal origin, mainly associated
 73  III,    10.  4.  2    |            throughout the food and animal feed chain;~· Establishing
 74  III,    10.  4.  2    |    measures to manage these risks. Animal health is an important factor
 75  III,    10.  4.  2    |           Community legislation on animal health covers certain zoonotic
 76  III,    10.  4.  2    |            covers certain zoonotic animal diseases, which can be transferred
 77  III,    10.  4.  2    |      technical products of certain animal by-products and identifying
 78  III,    10.  4.  2    |         for the use or disposal of animal waste.~ ~Zoonoses are diseases
 79  III,    10.  4.  2    |   relevance of different foods and animal species as sources of human
 80  III,    10.  4.  2    |           to prevent or treat food animal diseases, through the use
 81  III,    10.  4.  2    |            4.11~ ~Oils and fats of animal~origin, human milk~ ~Adverse
 82  III,    10.  4.  2    |           for~dioxins in foods and~animal feed~ ~ ~In 1998/99 intake
 83  III,    10.  4.  2    |        incineration; monitoring~of animal~feeds~ ~Freijer et al.,
 84  III,    10.  4.  2    |           PCBs)~ ~Oils and fats of animal~origin, human milk~ ~Adverse
 85  III,    10.  4.  2    |       monitoring of oils, fats~and animal feed;~environmental measures~ ~
 86  III,    10.  4.  2    |            as PBDEs)~ ~Products of animal~origin, human milk,~via
 87  III,    10.  4.  2    |           toxic to reproduction in animal experiments.~ ~Maximum concentrations
 88  III,    10.  4.  2    |            vegetables, cereals and animal products as appropriate.
 89  III,    10.  4.  2(36)|            in and on foodstuffs of animal origin (OJ L 221, 7.8.1986,
 90  III,    10.  4.  2    |           products and products of animal origin every few years.
 91  III,    10.  4.  2    |          milk~via peanut chunks in~animal feed~ ~Liver cancer (in~
 92  III,    10.  4.  2    |        products, milk~and meat via animal feed~products~ ~ ~Kidney
 93  III,    10.  4.  2    |        food (in particular food of animal origin such as meat and
 94  III,    10.  4.  2    |          offspring.~ ~The yield of animal cloning by somatic cell
 95  III,    10.  4.  2    |            emerging risk to human, animal and/or plant health is understood
 96  III,    10.  4.  2    |         the fields of food safety, animal health and welfare and plant
 97  III,    10.  4.  2    |      immediate threat to consumer, animal or plant health, the Commission
 98  III,    10.  4.  2    |            with feed and food law, animal health and animal welfare
 99  III,    10.  4.  2    |        food law, animal health and animal welfare rules (15) was adopted
100  III,    10.  4.  2    |       controls on feed and food of animal origin.~ ~The objective
101  III,    10.  4.  2    |            established for food of animal origin.~ ~In order to have
102  III,    10.  4.  2    |          hygiene rules for food of animal origin, and Council Directive
103  III,    10.  4.  2    |    intermediaries operating in the animal feed sector.~ ~Crisis management:
104  III,    10.  4.  2    |            with feed and food law, animal health and animal welfare
105  III,    10.  4.  2    |        food law, animal health and animal welfare rules. Official
106  III,    10.  4.  2    |          hygiene rules for food of animal origin. Official Journal
107  III,    10.  4.  2    |    intermediaries operating in the animal feed sector and amending
108  III,    10.  4.  3    |          pose a particular risk to animal and plant life in the aquatic
109  III,    10.  4.  5    |     pathogens derived from sewers, animal waste, the environment or
110  III,    10.  4.  5    |       treatment and pollution from animal waste, is the primary health
111  III,    10.  4.  5    |       treatment and pollution from animal waste, is the primary health
112   IV,    12.  1        |  Agricultural Policy (food safety, animal and plant health). In some
113   IV,    12.  4        |      consumer policy, food safety, animal health~ ~SG~Coordination
114   IV,    12.  4        |          particular public health, animal health and food safety.
115   IV,    12.  4        |          through taking account of animal health and welfare, plant
116   IV,    12.  4        |          the benefit of public and animal health.~ ~ESA~ ~European
117   IV,    12. 10        |         responsible for safe food, animal feed and veterinary drugs,
118   IV,    12. 10        |         responsible for safe food, animal feed and veterinary drugs,
119   IV,    12. 10        |          residues in foodstuffs of animal origin~S.I. 181 of 1999 -