Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  5    |            respond rapidly to peak production demands and seasonal variations
  2    I,     2.  5    |   practices such as ‘just-in-timeproduction and casual labour such as
  3    I,     2.  5    |    decentralised and may uselean production methods’. The result of
  4    I,     2.  7    |         and models documenting the production of more than 40 years of
  5    I,     2.  8    |                        2.8. Energy production~ ~Due to both population
  6    I,     2.  8    |    investments in renewable energy production installations in all regions
  7    I,     2.  8    |           health impacts along the production life cycle - from fuel extract
  8    I,     2.  8    |          involved in the different production stages. However, a holistic
  9    I,     2.  8    |           health impacts of energy production as a basis for avoiding
 10    I,     2.  8    |      positive health benefits. The production of electricity from nuclear
 11    I,     2. 10.  1|            farm animal biology and production. The generation of additional
 12    I,     2. 10.  1|    specific traits for sustainable production of plants and livestock;
 13    I,     2. 10.  3|     transformation of the means of production, distribution and exchange.
 14    I,     2. 10.  4|     require manufacturers to adapt production and packaging lines per
 15    I,     2. 10.  4|       which increases the costs of production and supply chain management
 16   II,     5.  4.  6|         The task of automating the production of EUCID indicators has
 17   II,     5.  5.  3|    informal care), indirect costs (production loss due to sick-leave and
 18   II,     5.  5.  3|         resource use components.~ ~Production losses and especially early
 19   II,     5.  5.  3|     excluded indirect costs due to production losses associated with the
 20   II,     5. 10.  1|         cross-contamination in the production line is important to inform
 21   II,     5. 10.  5|        derivatives are used in the production of foodstuffs, they must
 22   II,     5. 10.  5|            when used in the in the production of foodstuffs and derivatives
 23   II,     5. 11.  3|      excessive and abnormal grease production, a bacterium (Propionibacterium
 24   II,     5. 14.  2|   recommended so as to improve the production of higher quality information
 25   II,     6.  3.  1|           of outbreaks and not the production of data for more in-depth
 26   II,     6.  3.  6|           farming, industrial food production, and a largely international
 27   II,     6.  3.  6|          and, consequently, in the production and distribution of foods)
 28   II,     9.  3.  1|        atrophy, causes a decreased production of lactic acid and an environment
 29   II,     9.  3.  1|         process of reduced steroid production occurs gradually and often
 30   II,     9.  3.  1|          of the declining androgen production, while Symptomatic Late
 31   II,     9.  3.  1|     deficiency refers to the total production of androgen steroids, in
 32   II,     9.  3.  1|           the decrease in androgen production and an increase in the older
 33  III,    10.  2.  1|         for €66bn, while potential production not realised due to absenteeism,
 34  III,    10.  2.  1|     Atrophic gastritis impairs the production of the intrinsic factor
 35  III,    10.  2.  1|          to ascertain a sufficient production.~It could be shown that
 36  III,    10.  2.  1|      factors such as ease of local production has decreased with improvements
 37  III,    10.  2.  1|       hazards associated with food production and consumption, and weighing
 38  III,    10.  3.  2|            groups. In general, the production of toxic chemicals has increased
 39  III,    10.  3.  2|            as the overall chemical production.~ ~The chemical industry
 40  III,    10.  3.  2|         significant in the EU. The production of toxic chemicals has increased
 41  III,    10.  3.  2|         rate as the total chemical production, and both have grown faster
 42  III,    10.  3.  2|            of their lifecycle from production (or import) and processing
 43  III,    10.  3.  2|        place several decades after production and processing of a substance.
 44  III,    10.  3.  2|          globalisation of chemical production and trade. The European
 45  III,    10.  3.  2|            stages form extraction, production and use up to their final
 46  III,    10.  3.  2|            and analysis~ ~Chemical production~ ~European countries contribute
 47  III,    10.  3.  2|           past ten years, with the production of industrial chemicals
 48  III,    10.  3.  2|        2005 (Figure 10.3.2.2). The production of toxic chemicals25 increased
 49  III,    10.  3.  2|        Eurostat, 2006). The annual production of toxic industrial chemicals
 50  III,    10.  3.  2|           States.~ ~The increasing production, trade and use of manufactured
 51  III,    10.  3.  2|          2006).~ ~Figure 10.3.2.2. Production volumes of industrial chemicals
 52  III,    10.  3.  2|            2005~ ~Figure 10.3.2.3. Production of toxic chemicals in the
 53  III,    10.  3.  2|        Eurostat, 2006 derived from production statistics~ ~Industrial
 54  III,    10.  3.  2|           outsourcing’ of chemical production to rapidly developing regions,
 55  III,    10.  3.  2|            accidentally during the production process (RCEP, 2003).~ ~
 56  III,    10.  3.  2|          as embryonic development, production of sperm, control of the
 57  III,    10.  3.  2|          long time, even after the production of such substances has been
 58  III,    10.  3.  4|          and desertification. Food production may also be affected as
 59  III,    10.  3.  4|         reduction in gross primary production of terrestrial ecosystems
 60  III,    10.  3.  4|          This reduced agricultural production and increased production
 61  III,    10.  3.  4|           production and increased production costs, led to an estimated
 62  III,    10.  4.  2|         sustainability of our food production systems, the effects of
 63  III,    10.  4.  2|   requirements throughout the food production chain; d) food safety: limits
 64  III,    10.  4.  2|            all stages of food/feed production and distribution.~ ~The
 65  III,    10.  4.  2|     applicable at the site of food production as well as products on the
 66  III,    10.  4.  2|       control measures in the food production chain and to protect human
 67  III,    10.  4.  2|          human actions during food production~ ~ ~ ~Pesticides that are
 68  III,    10.  4.  2|   polyacrylamide include crude oil production, cosmetic additives and
 69  III,    10.  4.  2|             are widely used in the production of fluoropolymers and elastomers
 70  III,    10.  4.  2|         influenced by usage during production and storage. Systematic
 71  III,    10.  4.  2|    territories with regards to the production, contents, conditioning
 72  III,    10.  4.  2|        with food, manufacturing or production processes, food labelling,
 73  III,    10.  4.  2|  micro-organisms used in feed/food production across the EFSA Panels and
 74  III,    10.  4.  2|        SANCO and also includes the production, revision and updating of
 75  III,    10.  4.  2|            use of GMOs in the food production chain. GMOs are organisms
 76  III,    10.  4.  2|       extending these rules to the production and the placing on the market
 77  III,    10.  4.  2|         operators at all stages of production, processing and distribution
 78  III,    10.  4.  2|  activities covering all stages of production, processing and distribution.
 79  III,    10.  4.  2|         fulfilled at all stages of production, processing and distribution.~ ~
 80  III,    10.  4.  2|         sustainability of our food production systems, the effects of
 81  III,    10.  4.  4|     Chapter 5.13.~ ~The increasing production, trade and use of manufactured
 82  III,    10.  4.  5|          waste; oil extraction and production; and inadequate storage
 83  III,    10.  4.  5|          Union. The trend in waste production is that it increases with
 84  III,    10.  4.  5|        Sustainable Consumption and Production, Waste, and Environment
 85  III,    10.  4.  5|   description and analysis~ ~Waste production~ ~Based on the data available
 86  III,    10.  4.  5|         mining, quarrying, and the production of metals – while countries,
 87  III,    10.  4.  5|         working industries, energy production and oil industry. Gasoline
 88  III,    10.  4.  5|          current increase of waste production and incineration in many
 89  III,    10.  4.  5|     towards the reduction of waste production, re-use and recycling schemes,
 90  III,    10.  5.  1|          particles. Especially the production of particulate matter has
 91  III,    10.  5.  3|          retirement and costs from production losses will be presented.~ ~
 92  III,    10.  5.  3|           due to health problems~ ~Production losses~Production losses
 93  III,    10.  5.  3|       problems~ ~Production losses~Production losses are caused by absence
 94  III,    10.  5.  3|      productivity due to sickness. Production losses have not been calculated
 95  III,    10.  5.  3|          the major contributors to production (and productivity) losses
 96  III,    10.  5.  3|            respond rapidly to peak production demands and seasonal variations
 97  III,    10.  5.  3|   practices such as ‘just-in-timeproduction and casual labour such as
 98  III,    10.  5.  3|     transformation of the means of production, distribution and exchange.
 99  III,    10.  5.  3|    decentralised and may uselean production methods’. The result of
100   IV,    11.  1.  6|          encouraging efficiency in production.~ ~Case-based payment are
101   IV,    11.  6.  4|    stakeholder involvement and the production of guidance (Sorenson et
102   IV,    12.  1    |          and German coal and steel production should be “pooled”. Europe
103   IV,    12.  5    |          system of indicators, the production and utilisation of data
104   IV,    12. 10    |          already be created in the production stage. Producers and distributors
105   IV,    12. 10    |            substances, both in the production of the goods and in their
106   IV,    12. 10    |            including Germany - the production and use of hazardous chemicals (“
107   IV,    12. 10    |         legal framework covers the production, distribution and application
108   IV,    12. 10    |        control the import, export, production, supply and possession of
109   IV,    12. 10    |             which arranges tobacco production and sale issues, and the
110   IV,    12. 10    |          concerning the biological production of agricultural products.~ ~
111   IV,    12. 10    |       control system after primary production, enforced by the local authorities
112   IV,    13.  7.  2|    location advantages for R&D and production facilities; higher productivity,
113  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0| preventable~prion~prions~prisoners~production~professionals~prostate~proteinuria~