Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1   II,     5.  5.  3|     diseases, overweight, diabetes, dental problems, and polydipsia
  2   II,     5. 14    |                                5.14 Dental and oral diseases~ ~
  3   II,     5. 14.Acr|       Council of the European Chief Dental Officer~DMFT~Decayed, Missing,
  4   II,     5. 14.  1| Introduction~ ~Oral disease such as dental caries, periodontal disease,
  5   II,     5. 14.  1|           oropharyngeal cancers and dental trauma are major public
  6   II,     5. 14.  1|        major public health problem. Dental caries, otherwise known
  7   II,     5. 14.  1|             to 12allows adequate dental arch space for the eruption
  8   II,     5. 14.  1|         caries rates and more unmet dental treatment needs than their
  9   II,     5. 14.  1|          less desirable patterns of dental care. Information from the
 10   II,     5. 14.  1|            on patterns of untreated dental care in Europe will assist
 11   II,     5. 14.  1|             to facilitate access to dental services for children and
 12   II,     5. 14.  1|              the level of untreated dental caries tends to vary in
 13   II,     5. 14.  2|         years of age surveyed.~ ~b. Dental Contact within the Previous
 14   II,     5. 14.  2|          who visited the dentist or dental clinic within the past year.~
 15   II,     5. 14.  2|            who visited a dentist or dental clinic within the past years.~
 16   II,     5. 14.  2|           When did you last visit a dental professional about your
 17   II,     5. 14.  2|     population) of active dentists, dental hygienists, oral health
 18   II,     5. 14.  2|             therapists and clinical dental technicians.~Numerator:
 19   II,     5. 14.  2|             and number of filled of dental fillings, but not the outcomes,
 20   II,     5. 14.  2|       frequency and distribution of dental caries are complicated by
 21   II,     5. 14.  2|          condition should encourage dental professionals, consumers,
 22   II,     5. 14.  2|          and extend more affordable dental care to a wider public.~ ~
 23   II,     5. 14.  3|          description and analysis~ ~Dental caries~ ~In a European perspective,
 24   II,     5. 14.  3|      predominantly cases of quality dental care, meaning more fillings
 25   II,     5. 14.  3|           fact is that the state of dental health among European populations,
 26   II,     5. 14.  3|       instance, the actual level of dental caries in Portuguese children
 27   II,     5. 14.  3|            0 DMF-T.~ ~Table 5.14.1. Dental Health in 12 year-old children
 28   II,     5. 14.  3|             positive trend of lower dental caries experience in children
 29   II,     5. 14.  3|         that the prevalence rate of dental caries in children has remained
 30   II,     5. 14.  3|             children are in need of dental care. In adults, the data
 31   II,     5. 14.  3|            it must be stressed that dental caries, as a disease, has
 32   II,     5. 14.  3|              of all children have a dental caries experience greater
 33   II,     5. 14.  3|         caries rates and more unmet dental treatment needs than their
 34   II,     5. 14.  3|        adults still develop caries. Dental caries is increasing in
 35   II,     5. 14.  3|             groups at high risk for dental caries include people living
 36   II,     5. 14.  3|           countries~ ~The effect of dental caries on the overall quality
 37   II,     5. 14.  3|             to treat. The burden of dental caries lasts a lifetime
 38   II,     5. 14.  3|    populations in Europe increases, dental caries has become a burden
 39   II,     5. 14.  3|             reported high needs for dental care. Physical functioning
 40   II,     5. 14.  3|          long-term effectiveness of dental care.~ ~Therefore, the «
 41   II,     5. 14.  3|             risk factor - remain on dental health charts recorded in
 42   II,     5. 14.  3|             also the failure of the dental health care system. It is
 43   II,     5. 14.  3|           adults in a few places.~ ~Dental erosion~ ~Evidence has been
 44   II,     5. 14.  3|             has been collected that dental erosion, i.e. the loss of
 45   II,     5. 14.  3|            positive associations of dental erosion with decay experience
 46   II,     5. 14.  3|           Dugmore and Rock, 2004b). Dental erosion showed a higher
 47   II,     5. 14.  3|       region had established school dental services. Since 1989, privatization
 48   II,     5. 14.  3|       illustrates the difference in dental visit frequency of children
 49   II,     5. 14.  3|             Children aged 12 with a dental contact within the previous
 50   II,     5. 14.  3|             attend the dentist with dental emergencies (pain/problems)
 51   II,     5. 14.  3|            Europe revealed that the dental self-care capacity of schoolchildren
 52   II,     5. 14.  3|       likely as their peers to have dental decay and their disease
 53   II,     5. 14.  3|             difficulty in finding a dental provider who will treat
 54   II,     5. 14.  3|       barriers for obtaining needed dental services.~Several national
 55   II,     5. 14.  3|         annually makes at least one dental visit and the average number
 56   II,     5. 14.  3|             depending on age, race, dental status, level of education
 57   II,     5. 14.  3|            245 169 dentists, 13 295 dental hygienists work in 1998
 58   II,     5. 14.  3|         European Union and EEA. The dental profession has an impact
 59   II,     5. 14.  3|            in advanced health care. Dental expenditures represent 3.
 60   II,     5. 14.  3|            average expenditures for dental care per individual increased
 61   II,     5. 14.  3|           In 2000, expenditures for dental care represented an average
 62   II,     5. 14.  3|          care and 0.5% reserved for dental care. Finland (0.4%) and
 63   II,     5. 14.  4|           synergistic relationship. Dental diseases related to diet
 64   II,     5. 14.  4|             related to diet include dental caries, developmental defects
 65   II,     5. 14.  4|    developmental defects of enamel, dental erosion and periodontal
 66   II,     5. 14.  4|             for maximal general and dental health, may be a part of
 67   II,     5. 14.  4|             part of an adolescent’s dental health management. Nutrition
 68   II,     5. 14.  4|              Nutrition education by dental professionals must address
 69   II,     5. 14.  5|             to facilitate access to dental services for children and
 70   II,     5. 14.  5|              the level of untreated dental caries tends to vary in
 71   II,     5. 14.  5|          less desirable patterns of dental care. Information from the
 72   II,     5. 14.  5|            on patterns of untreated dental care in Europe will assist
 73   II,     5. 14.  5|           the scope of practice for dental hygienists and other providers,
 74   II,     5. 14.  6|          prevalence and severity of dental caries in those countries
 75   II,     5. 14.  6|             most appropriately with dental health care professionals
 76   II,     5. 14.  7|         likely to get the necessary dental care. More directed efforts
 77   II,     5. 14.  8|         Ismail AI, Pitts NB (2007): Dental caries. Lancet 2007; 369:
 78   II,     8.  2.  1|             Scior 2004). Visual and dental care needs are often undetected
 79   II,     8.  2.  1|             doubly disadvantaged as dental or medical treatments may
 80   II,     8.  2.  1|       Parental perceptions of unmet dental need and cost barriers to
 81   II,     9.  3.  1|          and flossing; professional dental services, including oral
 82  III,    10.  2.  1|            in strategies to prevent dental caries, a disease that had
 83  III,    10.  2.  1|            reduces the incidence of dental caries and slows or reverses
 84  III,    10.  2.  1|      lesions. Dramatic reduction in dental caries in children has been
 85  III,    10.  2.  1|      fluorides imply higher risk of dental caries. Moreover, settings
 86  III,    10.  2.  1|         performance of the European dental health system could target
 87  III,    10.  2.  1|      year-old children according to dental fluorosis (Dean’s index). .~
 88  III,    10.  2.  1|          prevalence and severity of dental caries. The frequency of
 89  III,    10.  2.  1|             level, the incidence of dental plaque and gingivitis is
 90  III,    10.  2.  1|         boys than girls.~ ~Improved dental hygiene seems to have reduced
 91  III,    10.  2.  1|        possibly due to the improved dental hygiene observed in industrialised
 92  III,    10.  2.  1|      various product groups such as dental floss, dental care, mouthwashes,
 93  III,    10.  2.  1|        groups such as dental floss, dental care, mouthwashes, fresheners,
 94  III,    10.  2.  1|             the evidence relates to dental caries prevention and control
 95  III,    10.  2.  1|             effective in preventing dental caries in both children
 96  III,    10.  2.  1|  toothpastes and the application of dental sealants are additional
 97  III,    10.  2.  1|     additional means for preventing dental caries. In a number of developing
 98  III,    10.  2.  1|             effective in preventing dental caries in permanent teeth.
 99  III,    10.  2.  1|            children at high risk of dental caries and can help to minimize
100  III,    10.  2.  1|            prevention of many oral, dental and craniofacial diseases
101  III,    10.  2.  1|       cancers, periodontal disease, dental caries, oral candidiasis
102  III,    10.  2.  1|             status. Although common dental diseases are preventable,
103  III,    10.  2.  1|          toothpastes for preventing dental caries in children and adolescents.
104  III,    10.  3.  2|          Other relevant sources are dental alloys, electronics, anti-cancer
105  III,    10.  3.  2|      road-runoff and discharge from dental clinics did not explain
106  III,    10.  6.  2|       better nutrition and improved dental care. Rebuilding individual
107   IV,    11.  1.  4|          pro-rich inequity found in dental care (Allin et al 2008).~ ~
108   IV,    11.  6.  2|            countries but Romania to dental care. About half of EU countries
109   IV,    12. 10    |             21 SGB V (prevention of dental diseases): nutritional advice
110   IV,    12. 10    |          advice is part of national dental health group programs for
111   IV,    12. 10    |              21 SGB V prevention of dental diseases: prophylaxis for
112   IV,    12. 10    |              22 SGB V prevention of dental diseases: prophylaxis for