Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1   II,     5.  1.  1    |           is still unresolved.~ ~· Dementia~A number of risk factors
  2   II,     5.  1.  1    |           but also protect against dementia (Haan and Wallace, 2004).
  3   II,     5.  1.  1    |       increased risk of developing dementia, it is difficult to disentangle
  4   II,     5.  5.Int    |             such as depression and dementia and by increasing the provision
  5   II,     5.  5.Int    |          young girlscondition.~ ~Dementia: Dementia does not solely
  6   II,     5.  5.Int    |             condition.~ ~Dementia: Dementia does not solely affect older
  7   II,     5.  5.Int(19)|                2000): Incidence of dementia and major subtypes in Europe:
  8   II,     5.  5.  2    |                             5.5.2. Dementia including Alzheimer’s disease~ ~
  9   II,     5.  5.  2    |     Epidemiology and Prevention of Dementia.~EuroCoDe~European Collaboration
 10   II,     5.  5.  2    |          European Collaboration on Dementia~ ~ ~
 11   II,     5.  5.  2    |           Introduction~ ~The termdementia” is used to describe various
 12   II,     5.  5.  2    |          account for most cases of dementia (Kurz, 2002). The prevalence
 13   II,     5.  5.  2    |           2002). The prevalence of dementia in EU is estimated to be
 14   II,     5.  5.  2    |          is constantly increasing. Dementia is an increasing burden
 15   II,     5.  5.  2    |        long term care. The risk of dementia can be reduced through a
 16   II,     5.  5.  2    |        part of the ageing process, dementia is nevertheless more common
 17   II,     5.  5.  2    |           one in three over 90. As dementia is more common in older
 18   II,     5.  5.  2    |          the number of people with dementia (Alzheimer Scotland, 2006).~ ~
 19   II,     5.  5.  2    |       Alzheimer Scotland, 2006).~ ~Dementia tends to progress slowly
 20   II,     5.  5.  2    |         hundred different kinds of dementia and symptoms vary from one
 21   II,     5.  5.  2    |         next. However, people with dementia commonly experience difficulties
 22   II,     5.  5.  2    |       problems worsen, people with dementia gradually become dependent
 23   II,     5.  5.  2    |     studies into the prevalence of dementia in Europe and in the world,
 24   II,     5.  5.  2    |     Epidemiology and Prevention of Dementia. The EURODEM working group
 25   II,     5.  5.  2    |   prevalence of moderate to severe dementia in several European countries
 26   II,     5.  5.  2    |            had been diagnosed with dementia and were living at home
 27   II,     5.  5.  2    |          the number of people with dementia as many people never receive
 28   II,     5.  5.  2    |        Moreover, for most forms of dementia, there are three possible
 29   II,     5.  5.  2    |         real number of people with dementia.~ ~The Ferri et al study~ ~
 30   II,     5.  5.  2    |            of published studies on dementia and agreed on prevalence
 31   II,     5.  5.  2    |         real number of people with dementia in some countries and in
 32   II,     5.  5.  2    |           age range suffering from dementia.~ ~Table 5.5.2.1. EURODEM
 33   II,     5.  5.  2    |    estimated number of people with dementia in each country within Europe
 34   II,     5.  5.  2    |    estimated number of people with dementia in selected EUGLOREH countries~ ~
 35   II,     5.  5.  2    |           to 6,120,842 people with dementia (depending on which prevalence
 36   II,     5.  5.  2    |          the number of people with dementia in several member states
 37   II,     5.  5.  2    |          the number of people with dementia as a percentage of the population
 38   II,     5.  5.  2    |          The number of people with dementia in Finland as a % of the
 39   II,     5.  5.  2    |          the number of people with dementia in Finland more than tripled.
 40   II,     5.  5.  2    |         percentages of people with dementia in their overall populations.
 41   II,     5.  5.  2    |          of 24 million people with dementia in the world today; this
 42   II,     5.  5.  2    |          be 42 million people with dementia in 2020 and 81 million by
 43   II,     5.  5.  2    |          the number of people with dementia as a percentage of the overall
 44   II,     5.  5.  2    |         and the under-diagnosis of dementia.~ ~There may be differences
 45   II,     5.  5.  2    | distribution of different kinds of dementia from one country or region
 46   II,     5.  5.  2    |         between different kinds of dementia or different stages of the
 47   II,     5.  5.  2    |    consensual prevalence rates for dementia. A database will also be
 48   II,     5.  5.  2    |           cause or protect against dementia (in particular Alzheimer’
 49   II,     5.  5.  2    |   Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia). A number of risk factors
 50   II,     5.  5.  2    |           but also protect against dementia (Haan and Wallace, 2004).
 51   II,     5.  5.  2    |       increased risk of developing dementia, it is difficult to disentangle
 52   II,     5.  5.  2    |         review of risk factors for dementia based on meta-analyses and
 53   II,     5.  5.  2    |       healthy lifestyle to prevent dementia. This will be finalised
 54   II,     5.  5.  2    |          the number of people with dementia. Governments are therefore
 55   II,     5.  5.  2    |            support for people with dementia is provided in the context
 56   II,     5.  5.  2    |      Iceland). Younger people with dementia would not be covered by
 57   II,     5.  5.  2    |            support for people with dementia. Alzheimer Europe is currently
 58   II,     5.  5.  2    |            provided to people with dementia and their carers in the
 59   II,     5.  5.  2    |       products”. For what concerns dementia, national Alzheimer associations
 60   II,     5.  5.  2    |      reduce the risk of developing dementia.~ ~Early diagnosis and appropriate
 61   II,     5.  5.  2    |            ensure that people with dementia can continue living in their
 62   II,     5.  5.  2    |     recorded number of people with dementia. On one hand, this could
 63   II,     5.  5.  2    |        provided to the person with dementia, but in some countries,
 64   II,     5.  5.  2    |          European Collaboration on DementiaEuroCoDe” (Alzheimer Europe,
 65   II,     5.  5.  2    |         key actors in the field of dementia and a number of established
 66   II,     5.  5.  2    |         disease and other forms of dementia. Unfortunately, the call
 67   II,     5.  5.  2    |          factors which might cause dementia with the aim of reducing
 68   II,     5.  5.  2    |          reducing the incidence of dementia (Cooper, 2002). Certain
 69   II,     5.  5.  2    |    increase the risk of developing dementia in people with the non-modifiable
 70   II,     5.  5.  2    |             this gives people with dementia the chance to sort out their
 71   II,     5.  5.  2    |      However, for many people with dementia, a time comes when they
 72   II,     5.  5.  2    |        arise whereby a person with dementia under guardianship moves
 73   II,     5.  5.  2    |            to occur as a result of dementia, and to try to maintain
 74   II,     5.  5.  2    |            only of the person with dementia but also of the carer so
 75   II,     5.  5.  2    |          in caring for people with dementia, Alzheimer associations
 76   II,     5.  5.  2    |           care for the person with dementia throughout the process and
 77   II,     5.  5.  2    |      Alzheimer movement to address dementia and Alzheimer’s disease
 78   II,     5.  5.  2    |          and its members in making dementia a public health priority
 79   II,     5.  5.  2    |           Alzheimer Europe (2006): Dementia in Europe Yearbook. Alzheimer
 80   II,     5.  5.  2    |            provided to people with dementia and their carers (ongoing
 81   II,     5.  5.  2    |            Who cares? The state of dementia care in Europe. Alzheimer
 82   II,     5.  5.  2    |     evidence on risk reduction and dementia, Alzheimer Scotland. [on-line
 83   II,     5.  5.  2    |        Thinking preventively about dementia: a review, International
 84   II,     5.  5.  2    |        2005): Global prevalence of dementia: a Delphi consensus study.
 85   II,     5.  5.  2    |          and Wallace R (2004): Can dementia be prevented? Brain aging
 86   II,     5.  5.  2    |             1-24.~ ~Kurz A (2002): Dementia: definition and concept,
 87   II,     5.  5.  3    |   inflicted injuries eleventh, and dementia fourteenth). In terms of
 88   II,     5.  5.  3    |            addition, psychosis and dementia contribute considerably
 89   II,     5.  5.  3    |     disorders, such as Alzheimer’s dementia.~The Project EuroParkinson
 90   II,     5.  5.  3    |           Parkinson’s Disease with Dementia (GEPAD). Journal of neurology
 91   II,     5.  6.  3    |         third at age 6584 after dementia and stroke.~ ~Osteoarthritis~ ~
 92   II,     8.  2.  1    |           vulnerable to developing dementia of the Alzheimer’s type -
 93   II,     9.  3.  1    |     dysfunction, increased risk of dementia and sleep apnoea.~ ~Though
 94   II,     9.  4.  3    |             such as depression and dementia and an increase in the provision
 95   II,     9.  4.  3    |         Medicine Society, 2002).~ ~Dementia: Assessment and care packages
 96   II,     9.  4.  3    |            the yearly incidence of dementia by more than half, through
 97   II,     9.  4.  3    |           Medicine Society, 2002).~Dementia does not solely affect older
 98   II,     9.  4.  3    |      factor in men (see chapter on dementia for further details and
 99   II,     9.  4.  6    |        cost of placing people with dementia into residential care amounted
100   II,     9.  4.  6    |            of the total budget for dementia (Gray et al, 1993). Although
101   II,     9.  4.  6    |          chronic condition such as dementia need residential or nursing
102   II,     9.  5.  3    |    research found that people with dementia are over 30 times more likely
103   II,     9.  5.  3    |        than people who do not have dementia. This has serious implications
104   II,     9.  5.  3    |        need to provide one year of dementia care per person over the
105  III,    10.  2.  4    |        cardiovascular diseases and dementia or as the interaction of
106   IV,    13.  2.  2    |   inflicted injuries eleventh, and dementia fourteenth). In terms of
107   IV,    13.  5        |       mental illnesses, especially dementia, are particularly difficult
108   IV,    13.  5        |            difficult to cope with. Dementia is a condition of irreversible
109   IV,    13.  5        |            approximately 60-70% of dementia cases. The primary risk
110   IV,    13.  5        |            primary risk factor for dementia is age, with the prevalence
111  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0    |       delirium~deliveries~delivery~dementia~demographic~demography~dengue~