Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  7        |        materials, and can count on an energy cycle based on a mix of
  2    I,     2.  7        |          positioned in order to limit energy consumption and make the
  3    I,     2.  7        |         entirely fuelled by renewable energy sources, including photovoltaic
  4    I,     2.  7        |                including photovoltaic energy, solar energy and waste
  5    I,     2.  7        |            photovoltaic energy, solar energy and waste recycling. Some
  6    I,     2.  7        |             self-sufficient water and energy systems. The city is being
  7    I,     2.  7        |              at ensuring that all the energy used in the Reichstag, the
  8    I,     2.  8        |                                  2.8. Energy production~ ~Due to both
  9    I,     2.  8        |           growth and economic growth, energy consumption and resulting
 10    I,     2.  8        |              European region, despite energy efficiency improvements
 11    I,     2.  8        |            increased use of renewable energy in certain areas. This trend
 12    I,     2.  8        |       measures are implemented. Total energy consumption throughout the
 13    I,     2.  8        |               in parts of Europe, the energy supply sector remains a
 14    I,     2.  8        |              investments in renewable energy production installations
 15    I,     2.  8        |              public health impacts of energy production as a basis for
 16    I,     2.  8        |        adopted by the enterprises and energy companies, in order to control
 17    I,     2.  8        |              as photovoltaic and wind energy, are associated with fewer
 18    I,     2.  8        |            increased use of renewable energy, especially wind, solar
 19    I,     2.  8        |                solar and photovoltaic energy, will have positive health
 20    I,     2.  8        |           makers. The market price of energy is also very important for
 21    I,     2.  8        |          prices of essential forms of energy (e.g. as is currently the
 22   II,     5.  4.  6    |            particular to children, of energy dense foods and sugar-sweetened
 23   II,     5.  6.  1    |    musculoskeletal injuries e.g. high energy limb fractures, strains
 24   II,     5. 13        |         lifestyles actually need less energy. Social and economic pressures
 25   II,     5. 13        |    body weight associated with excess energy intake poses one of the
 26   II,     7.Acr        |               Directorate-General for Energy and Transport~EC~European
 27   II,     7.  1        |      resulting from acute exposure to energy (mechanical, thermal, electrical,
 28   II,     9            |         lifestyles actually need less energy. Social and economic pressures
 29   II,     9            |              habits and food pattern, energy and nutrient intake vary
 30   II,     9.  2.  2    |           with Education and Culture, Energy and Transport, Environment,
 31   II,     9.  3.  1    |               increased abundance of ‘energy densefoods and drinks
 32   II,     9.  3.  1    |          passive over-consumption’ of energy.~2. The systematic public
 33   II,     9.  3.  1    |                from a generic loss of energy to depression, from frailty
 34   II,     9.  3.  1    |         lifestyles actually need less energy. Social and economic pressures
 35   II,     9.  4.  4    |              habits and food pattern, energy and nutrient intake vary
 36   II,     9.  4.  5    |           However, given the time and energy absorbed by these reforms,
 37   II,     9.  5.  3    |         lifestyles actually need less energy. Social and economic pressures
 38  III,    10.  1.  1    |           physical activity influence energy balance. Energy input and
 39  III,    10.  1.  1    |             influence energy balance. Energy input and energy expenditure
 40  III,    10.  1.  1    |             balance. Energy input and energy expenditure are direct modulators
 41  III,    10.  1.  1    |              intake combined with low energy output is a behavioural
 42  III,    10.  1.  1    |  environmental factors which increase energy intake and / or reduce physical activity
 43  III,    10.  1.  1    |              al, 2005). The amount of energy intake and expenditure as
 44  III,    10.  1.  1    |              addressed the effects of energy expended in exercise on
 45  III,    10.  1.  1    |            the normal activity range, energy intake is balanced with
 46  III,    10.  1.  1    |           Most evidence suggests that energy intake is more or less resistant
 47  III,    10.  1.  1    |                1-3 days) increases in energy expenditure, while increases
 48  III,    10.  1.  1    |           short term coupling between energy expenditure and energy intake
 49  III,    10.  1.  1    |        between energy expenditure and energy intake may be due to the
 50  III,    10.  1.  1    |               the correlation between energy intake and expenditure increases:
 51  III,    10.  1.  1    |            demonstrate an increase in energy intake. However, obese,
 52  III,    10.  1.  1    |             tend to balance the extra energy expenditure through increased
 53  III,    10.  1.  1    |         expenditure through increased energy intake. Intense exercise
 54  III,    10.  1.  1    |              be altered by changes in energy expenditure. The literature
 55  III,    10.  1.  1    |        consume a higher percentage of energy as carbohydrate and a lower
 56  III,    10.  1.  1    |               of accurately assessing energy expenditure and intake create
 57  III,    10.  1.  1    |             studies only consider the energy intake immediately following
 58  III,    10.  1.  3    |                loose coupling between energy expenditure and energy intake.
 59  III,    10.  1.  3    |        between energy expenditure and energy intake. Int J Obes Relat
 60  III,    10.  1.  3    |         increases in exercise-induced energy expenditure? Proc Nutr Soc
 61  III,    10.  1.  3    |             control: implications for energy balance. Med Sci Sports
 62  III,    10.  1.  3    |               C, Schneiter Ph (2003): Energy expenditure, physical activity
 63  III,    10.  2.  1    |               muscles that results in energy expenditure above resting
 64  III,    10.  2.  1(20)|              1 MET corresponds to the energy (oxygen) used by the body
 65  III,    10.  2.  1    |               Directorate-General for Energy and Transport.~ ~European
 66  III,    10.  2.  1    |     Directorate General Transport and Energy. Brussels, COM(2007) 551
 67  III,    10.  2.  1    |         choice, physical activity and energy balance. Physiology & Behaviour,
 68  III,    10.  2.  1    |      body weight associated to excess energy intake poses one of the
 69  III,    10.  2.  1    |             the diet towards a higher energy density diet with a greater
 70  III,    10.  2.  1    |         appropriate dietary intake of energy in the form of macronutrients
 71  III,    10.  2.  1    |             are related to his or her energy requirements, age, height
 72  III,    10.  2.  1    |          Although in the EU excessive energy intake is the main nutritional
 73  III,    10.  2.  1    |            anorexia nervosa. Reducing energy and fat intake can easily
 74  III,    10.  2.  1    |            diet and maintain a better energy balance;~· decrease the
 75  III,    10.  2.  1    |              from 35-45% of the total energy intake to 15-30% and to
 76  III,    10.  2.  1    |            limiting the amount of fat energy that can be physically consumed.
 77  III,    10.  2.  1    |              we must acknowledge that energy density, portion size and
 78  III,    10.  2.  1    | last-mentioned approach will increase energy allowance and give room
 79  III,    10.  2.  1    |               for Food. Nutrition and energy intakes for the European
 80  III,    10.  3.  1    |               some of which emit high energy alpha radiation. Alpha-emitting
 81  III,    10.  3.  1    |              is the implementation of energy saving policies recommending
 82  III,    10.  3.  4    |               budget for environment, energy and transport to around €
 83  III,    10.  3.  4    |          domains such as air quality, energy security, employment and
 84  III,    10.  3.  4    |        comprise malnutrition (proteinenergy malnutrition and/or micronutrient
 85  III,    10.  4.  1    |              ExternE~Externalities of Energy project for Scenario Assessment~
 86  III,    10.  4.  1    |             structural changes in the energy system. The main contributor
 87  III,    10.  4.  1    |           areas, in particular in the energy, transport and agriculture
 88  III,    10.  4.  1    |           areas, in particular in the energy, transport and agriculture
 89  III,    10.  4.  1    |            ceilings; and~· Pricing in energy and fuels.~ ~ ~ ~
 90  III,    10.  4.  5    |                6% is incinerated with energy recovery and 21% is unspecified.
 91  III,    10.  4.  5    |               6 % is incinerated with energy recovery and 21 % is unspecified (
 92  III,    10.  4.  5    |             metal working industries, energy production and oil industry.
 93  III,    10.  4.  5    |       recycled or used as a source of energy. As a final resort, waste
 94  III,    10.  5.  1    |               pollution determinants, energy saving and energy use in
 95  III,    10.  5.  1    |       determinants, energy saving and energy use in air conditioning.
 96  III,    10.  5.  1    |           public transport, efficient energy solutions, and reduced space
 97  III,    10.  5.  1    |          about construction products, energy performance, noise, air,
 98  III,    10.  5.  1    |            Wilkinson P, et al (2007): Energy, energy efficiency, and
 99  III,    10.  5.  1    |              P, et al (2007): Energy, energy efficiency, and the built
100   IV,    12.  4        |       Professionals~TREN~Road safety, Energy, Ionising radiation, Working
101   IV,    12.  4        |                 etc.~TREN~Intelligent Energy Europe, actions under the
102   IV,    12. 10        |             Youth policy~Child policy~Energy balance~Proportion of overweight
103   IV,    12. 10        |              5~ ~Environmental policy~Energy policy~Housing policy~Transport
104   IV,    12. 10        |            objective and policy areas~Energy balance~Proportion of overweight
105   IV,    13.  2.  3    |               obesity (shown here as “energy balance”), or of increasing
106   IV,    13.  2.  3    |            due to dietary factors and energy balance, against other lifestyle
107   IV,    13.  2.  3    |         overweight (due to a positive energy balance)~2. This relates
108   IV,    13.  2.  3    |          relevant types of cancer.~3. Energy balance is the dietary factor
109  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0    |    endocarditis~endocrine~endometrium~energy~england~enlargement~enteritidis~