Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  7    |            relationship between the natural elements and the colours
  2    I,     2.  7    |           between the city and the “naturalwetland.~Within this context,
  3    I,     2.  8    |         Small (mainly occupational)~Natural gas~ ~Cleaner burning than
  4    I,     2.  9    |          various changes will cause natural hazards and damage to infrastructure
  5    I,     2. 10.  2|            the classification (e.g. natural occurring vs. manufactured
  6    I,     3.  2    |           490 million. In the past, natural population growth (i.e.
  7    I,     3.  2    |          more recently the share of natural growth is diminishing. Immigration
  8    I,     3.  2    |           together).~ ~In the past, natural population growth (the number
  9    I,     3.  2    |          more recently the share of natural growth has been diminishing.
 10    I,     3.  2    |            Netherlands the rates of natural population increase are
 11    I,     3.  2    |        projections show diminishing natural growth and ultimately negative
 12    I,     3.  2    |          Figure 3.3).~ ~Figure 3.3. Natural increase rate and migration
 13    I,     3.  2    |        States already have negative natural growth at the moment (i.e.
 14    I,     3.  2    |     Netherlands (still) have a high natural increase. The 12 new Member
 15    I,     3.  2    |            and Malta where positive natural growth continues together
 16    I,     3.  2    |         Republic still has positive natural population growth although
 17    I,     3.  2    |             all experience negative natural growth. The ‘lowest low’
 18    I,     3.  2    |           smaller) negative rate of natural increase. Bulgaria, Estonia,
 19    I,     3.  2    |            already have substantial natural decrease.~ ~The First Annual
 20    I,     3.  2    |             In countries with a net natural decrease in population,
 21    I,     3.  3    |            smaller or even negative natural increase (excess of deaths
 22   II,     5.  1.  1|      process associated with a long natural history. Other certain risk
 23   II,     5.  1.  1|         asbestos); some pesticides; natural toxins present in food;
 24   II,     5.  2.  6|         phases in the course of the natural history of the disease or
 25   II,     5.  3.  4|      process associated with a long natural history. Other certain risk
 26   II,     5.  4.  1|             cost profile during the natural history of diabetes is '
 27   II,     5.  4.  7|             around the EU. The most natural direction for this would
 28   II,     5.  5.  3|           increased death rate from natural and unnatural causes (premature
 29   II,     5.  5.  3|         differentiated according to natural and unnatural deaths, and
 30   II,     5.  5.  3|        differentiation according to natural and unnatural deaths. Death
 31   II,     5.  5.  3|          symptoms, age of onset, or natural history. These disorders
 32   II,     5.  5.  3|        indices and for studying the natural history of the disease (
 33   II,     5.  5.  3|            relevant in studying the natural history and physiopathology
 34   II,     5.  5.  3|     Guðmundsson J et al (2002): The natural history of untreated multiple
 35   II,     5.  5.  3|           19:205-268.~Ebers (1998). Natural history of multiple sclerosis.
 36   II,     5.  5.  3|           442.~Hoehn MM (1992): The natural history of Parkinson’s disease
 37   II,     5.  6.  3|              Altman et al, 1986).~ ~Natural history~ ~The course of
 38   II,     5.  6.  3|       marker (Combe et al, 2007).~ ~Natural history~ ~Inflammatory polyarthritis
 39   II,     5.  6.  3|         distal forearm fractures.~ ~Natural history~ ~A classical case
 40   II,     5.  6.  3|           as recurrent back pain.~ ~Natural history~ ~Most episodes
 41   II,     5.  6.  6|        Symmons D (2001) What is the natural history of rheumatoid arthritis?
 42   II,     5.  8.  6|       exacerbations, comorbidities, natural history, deaths and costs
 43   II,     5.  8.  7|        Definition, epidemiology and natural history of COPD. Eur Respir
 44   II,     5.  9. FB|            our understanding of the natural history of the process of
 45   II,     5.  9.  3|            analysis~ ~Incidence and natural history~ ~With respect to
 46   II,     5.  9.  3|       history~ ~With respect to its natural history, asthma presents
 47   II,     5.  9.  3|             deeper knowledge of the natural history of asthma, from
 48   II,     5.  9.  7|          retrospective study on the natural history of asthma in Italy.
 49   II,     5. 10.  5|            soybean oil and fat (1); natural mixed tocopherols (E306),
 50   II,     5. 10.  5|           mixed tocopherols (E306), natural D-alpha tocopherol, natural
 51   II,     5. 10.  5|         natural D-alpha tocopherol, natural D-alpha tocopherol acetate,
 52   II,     5. 10.  5|         D-alpha tocopherol acetate, natural D-alpha tocopherol succinate
 53   II,     5. 12.  2|            a regression line to the natural logarithm of the rates using
 54   II,     5. 14.  1|          small and maintain as much natural tooth as possible. Often,
 55   II,     5. 14.  2|             who have lost all their natural teeth.~Numerator: Number
 56   II,     5. 14.  2|             who have lost all their natural teeth.~Denominator: Number
 57   II,     5. 15.  2|    prevalence rate.~ ~As regard the natural history of RD, the sources
 58   II,     5. 15.  4|             pan-European studies of natural history, patho-physiology,
 59   II,     6.  3.  7|             Francisella tularensis. Natural reservoirs include wild
 60   II,     6.  3.  7|          acute febrile illness. The natural reservoirs are sheep, cattle,
 61   II,     9        |       factors for the elderly~ ~The natural decline in cardiac function
 62   II,     9.  2.  2|            to areas of conflict and natural disaster. However, some
 63   II,     9.  3.  1|        ovarian follicular activity. Natural menopause is recognized
 64   II,     9.  3.  1|          ethnic variation in age at natural menopause, in climacteric
 65   II,     9.  3.  1|   accelerates for a few years after natural menopause or ophorectomy,
 66   II,     9.  3.  1|          loss and fractures are not natural consequences of ageing and
 67   II,     9.  4.  4|         factors for elderly~ ~ ~The natural decline in cardiac function
 68   II,     9.  5.  1|             prevalence / incidence, natural history, diagnosis, and
 69   II,     9.  5.  3|         games, girls tend to prefer natural areas over manufactured
 70  III,    10.  1    |            some pesticides~asbestos~natural toxins (aflatoxin)~polycyclic
 71  III,    10.  2.  1|      substances, both synthetic and natural, are being prompted as health
 72  III,    10.  2.  1|          lack of perspective on the natural development of these pathologies.
 73  III,    10.  3.  1|            buildings thorugh better natural ventilation in sub-floor
 74  III,    10.  3.  1|         increase in exposure due to natural radiation sources (including
 75  III,    10.  3.  2|           Introduction~ ~Chemicals, natural and man-made, are an integral
 76  III,    10.  3.  2|             an integral part of our natural and urban environment. The
 77  III,    10.  3.  2|         threats include exposure to natural or human-made toxic substances
 78  III,    10.  3.  2|            some pesticides~asbestos~natural toxins (aflatoxin)~polycyclic
 79  III,    10.  3.  2|   contamination in products or from natural sources. Arsenic in drinking
 80  III,    10.  3.  4|       Flooding is the most frequent natural disaster in European Union
 81  III,    10.  4.  1|          between air pollutants and natural particles such as pollen
 82  III,    10.  4.  1|          between air pollutants and natural particles such as pollen
 83  III,    10.  4.  2|          carcinogen, are present as natural contaminant of ground water
 84  III,    10.  4.  2|         current levels of~exposure, natural growth~promoters have no
 85  III,    10.  4.  3| availability of drinking water from natural sources is threatened by
 86  III,    10.  4.  3|            situations of floods and natural disasters and distribution
 87  III,    10.  4.  3|           countries.~ ~Arsenic is a natural contaminant of ground water.
 88  III,    10.  4.  3|  groundwater tables and threatening natural wetlands as well as causing
 89  III,    10.  4.  3|             is highly vulnerable to natural disasters as flooding, earthquakes
 90  III,    10.  4.  3|        households are contaminating natural waters and drinking water
 91  III,    10.  4.  3|        occasionally contaminated by natural contaminants such as arsenic,
 92  III,    10.  5.  1|             more or less advantaged natural landscapes. Both dimensions
 93  III,    10.  5.  1|          142.~ ~Norback JP, (1997): Natural Language Computer Control
 94  III,    10.  5.  3|           are experiencing negative natural growth, migration represents
 95  III,    10.  5.  3|       workplaces receive sufficient natural light and are equipped with
 96  III,    10.  6.  2|             2006 and was called the natural continuation of Finland’
 97   IV,    12. 10    |         protection against enhanced natural radioactivity. The work
 98   IV,    12. 10    |      citizens are encouraged to use Natural Gas for heating homes. For
 99   IV,    12. 10    |           the usage and benefits of natural gas. Moreover, they provide
100   IV,    12. 10    |   concerning protection against the natural hazards. The same instructions
101   IV,    12. 10    |            to enhance the income of natural entities and households
102   IV,    12. 10    |             for bathing waters from natural zones according to the directive
103   IV,    13.  6.  1|     developmental stimulus from the natural interaction with other children