Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  1       |           ageing, family structure, labour market population and minority
  2    I,     2.  1       |           productivity; (ii) higher labour supply;(iii) improved skills
  3    I,     2.  1       |         importance of health in the labour market in rich countries,
  4    I,     2.  1       |          economy via its effects on labour costs, labour market flexibility
  5    I,     2.  1       |            effects on labour costs, labour market flexibility and the
  6    I,     2.  3       |          increasing. In relation to labour market participation, participation/
  7    I,     2.  4       |       integrate and progress in the labour market, adequate and well-designed
  8    I,     2.  5       |       variations whilst controlling labour costs. Their approach has
  9    I,     2.  5       | just-in-timeproduction and casual labour such as temporary work and
 10    I,     2.  5       |            main feature revealed by labour market researchers is an
 11    I,     2.  5       |           64-year-old people in the labour market, especially of women
 12    I,     2.  5       |          the “young elderly” in the labour force started declining
 13    I,     2.  5       |        nonetheless the age when the labour force actually leaves their
 14    I,     2.  5       |            developments in European labour markets. The report integrates
 15    I,     2.  5       |     inclusion measures, pension and labour market reforms have improved
 16    I,     2.  5       |          work longer, provided that labour markets are opened up to
 17    I,     2.  5       |           workers occupy within the labour market puts their health
 18    I,     2.  5       |             jobs in Europe. Growing labour needs are mainly in highly
 19    I,     2.  5       |          mainly in highly qualified labour as well as in low and medium
 20    I,     2.  5       |             The feminisation of the labour force and changes in the
 21    I,     2.  5       |          increasing. In relation to labour market participation, participation/
 22    I,     2.  5       |        places additional demands on labour inspectorates, in order
 23    I,     2.  6       |           students aged 15 or more, labour market developments also
 24    I,     2. 10.  3   |             movement of capital and labour and work processes and products,
 25    I,     2. 10.  3(6)|                       International Labour Office (2006): Changing
 26    I,     2. 10.  3(6)|        world of work. International Labour Conference, 95th Session
 27    I,     2. 10.  3(7)|           technology. International Labour Review. Geneva, ILO; 134(
 28    I,     2. 11       |           technology. International Labour Review. Geneva, ILO; 134(
 29    I,     2. 11       |            5),587-603~International Labour Office (2006): Changing
 30    I,     2. 11       |        world of work. International Labour Conference, 95th Session
 31    I,     3.  1       |             patterns include female labour force participation and
 32    I,     3.  3       |          the share of the potential labour market population will be,
 33    I,     3.  4       |          Evidence from the European Labour Force Survey and from Other
 34   II,     4.  1       |        women, highlighting that the labour force participation of older
 35   II,     5.  5.Int(9)| Introduction. Geneva: International Labour Office. [on-line publication
 36   II,     5.  5.  3   |           of appropriately flexible labour and social policies for
 37   II,     5. 14.  1   |       skills to meet the needs of a labour intensive service with high
 38   II,     6.  3.  3   |             services and supervised labour care of pregnant women.~ ~ ~
 39   II,     7.Acr       |         Data Base~ILO~International Labour Organisation~IPV~Interpersonal
 40   II,     7.  2.  4   |        relevant national authority (Labour Inspection, etc.) for countries
 41   II,     8.Acr       |       Intellectual Disabilities~LFS~Labour Force Survey~WHO~World Health
 42   II,     8.  1.  2   |            2. Data Sources~ ~The EU Labour Force Survey (LFS), based
 43   II,     8.  1.  4   |        non-health surveys such as a Labour Force Survey as well as
 44   II,     8.  1.  5   |            disabilities in the open labour market. Better access to
 45   II,     8.  1.  5   |      fostering accessibility of the labour market, boosting accessibility
 46   II,     8.  2.  2   |        Member States by means of EU Labour Force Survey (LFS) carried
 47   II,     8.  2.  3   |        Member States by means of EU Labour Force Survey (LFS) carried
 48   II,     8.  2.  3   |          and Health (2001).~LFS:~EU Labour Force Survey~LSHPD:~long
 49   II,     9           |      intervention during pregnancy, labour, and delivery (Bai et al,
 50   II,     9.  1.  1   |          births by mode of onset of labour~R: Distribution of place
 51   II,     9.  1.  2   |      intervention during pregnancy, labour, and delivery (Bai et al,
 52   II,     9.  2.  5   |              sex tourism and forced labour. It proposes a wide action
 53   II,     9.  3.  1   |         Introduction. International Labour Office, Geneva~ ~Glei DA,
 54   II,     9.  5.  3   |      persons as a percentage of the labour force, 2003~ ~In most countries,
 55   II,     9.  5.  3   |      combining participation in the labour market with private responsibilities.
 56   II,     9.  5.  3   |             women to be outside the labour force is therefore family
 57  III,    10.  1       |       society, such as economic and labour market conditions and the
 58  III,    10.  2.  1   |           2006): Modulehealth and labour” of the permanent survey
 59  III,    10.  5.  3   |         authorities (often National Labour Inspection Service), but
 60  III,    10.  5.  3   |      ad-hoc-modules of the European labour force surveys in 1999 and
 61  III,    10.  5.  3   |         1999 and 2002. The European labour force survey is an annual
 62  III,    10.  5.  3   |           ad-hoc-module 1999 of the Labour Force Survey covered all
 63  III,    10.  5.  3   |             the 2005 European Union Labour Force Survey (LFS); among
 64  III,    10.  5.  3   |       variations whilst controlling labour costs. Their approach has
 65  III,    10.  5.  3   | just-in-timeproduction and casual labour such as temporary work and
 66  III,    10.  5.  3   |            main feature revealed by labour market researchers is increasing
 67  III,    10.  5.  3   |             movement of capital and labour and work processes and products
 68  III,    10.  5.  3   |           workers occupy within the labour market puts their health
 69  III,    10.  5.  3   |        places additional demands on labour inspectorates and so forth,
 70  III,    10.  5.  3   |             1981, the International Labour Organisation (ILO) adopted
 71  III,    10.  5.  3   |           ILO (1981): International Labour Organisation: Occupational
 72  III,    10.  5.  3   |            at: htt tm~International Labour Organization (2006): International
 73  III,    10.  5.  3   |  Organization (2006): International Labour Organisation: Changing patterns
 74  III,    10.  5.  3   |        world of work. International Labour Conference, 95th Session
 75  III,    10.  5.  3   |           ILO (2007): International Labour Organisation: Geneva. htt tm~
 76  III,    10.  5.  3   |          Act 1974~ILO~International Labour Organisation~MSDs~Musculoskeletal
 77  III,    10.  6.  2   |           who have been outside the labour market for years and socially
 78   IV,    11.  3.  1   |             health sector is highly labour intensive. Typically, the
 79   IV,    11.  6.  1   |         Europe include increases in labour costs, technological innovation
 80   IV,    11.  6.  1   |          structure), changes in the labour market, the stability and
 81   IV,    11.  6.  2   |           2002). However, there are labour market implications from
 82   IV,    11.  6.  2   |            pay large contributions, labour costs may rise resulting
 83   IV,    11.  6.  2   |             financial burden on the labour market (Sandier et al 2004).
 84   IV,    12.  1       |     Employment and social affairs~ ~Labour law and~work organisation~
 85   IV,    12.  5       |          health on productivity and labour participation as a contribution
 86   IV,    12. 10       |              Women and Adolescents, Labour Agency (Bundesagentur für
 87   IV,    12. 10       |              Gender equality in the labour market and labour relations,
 88   IV,    12. 10       |            in the labour market and labour relations, according to
 89   IV,    12. 10       |          well as economic security, labour market, integration, working
 90   IV,    12. 10       |          policy~Working life policy~Labour market policy~Housing policy~
 91   IV,    12. 10       |            Equal opportunity policy~Labour market status~Employment
 92   IV,    12. 10       |             Domain of objective 2~ ~Labour market policy~ ~Work environment
 93   IV,    13.  3       |          enjoy easier access to the labour market. Active inclusion
 94   IV,    13.  3       |         Active inclusion and active labour market policies are needed
 95   IV,    13.  3       |         Active inclusion and active labour market policies are needed
 96   IV,    13.  3       |           employed. Even in buoyant labour markets, the share of jobless
 97   IV,    13.  4       |            their descendants in the labour market. The main issue is
 98   IV,    13.  4       |            Guidelines 19 (Inclusive Labour Markets) and 20 (Matching
 99   IV,    13.  4       |        Markets) and 20 (Matching of Labour Market needs) underline
100   IV,    13.  4       |          States to make immigrants' labour market integration a more
101   IV,    13.  5       |     increasingly participate in the labour force. Spouses are still
102  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0   |                                     labour force~labour market~landfill~
103  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0   |                        labour force~labour market~landfill~landfills~