Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    -,     1        |          Avanzo and Paola Marini for financial matters, Gaetano Guglielmi
  2    I,     2.  1    |              5% accounted for by the financial services or the retail trade
  3    I,     2.  4    |         population coverage, address financial barriers to care, emphasize
  4    I,     2.  5    |        impact on future adequacy and financial, economic and social sustainability.
  5    I,     2.  5    |               public information and financial literacy (Joint Report on
  6    I,     2.  7    |              a technological park, a financial centre, an events pavilion
  7    I,     2. 11    | Directorate-general for economic and financial affairs. Special Report
  8   II,     5.  1.  2|               x-rays, hospital care, financial coverage through medical
  9   II,     5.  3.  7|          together with all available financial and non-financial resources
 10   II,     5.  5.  2|          sort out their personal and financial matters and to live in an
 11   II,     5.  5.  3|          carry an enormous amount of financial (and psychological) burden.
 12   II,     5.  5.  3|           increased. The strategy of financial allocation should be reconsidered
 13   II,     5.  5.  3|             reduce chronic cases and financial burden;~· to reduce the
 14   II,     5.  5.  3|              both the prevalence and financial burden of the disease and
 15   II,     5.  5.  3|          project is the study of the Financial Burden of ASD. The economic
 16   II,     5.  5.  3|       relatives for help and care or financial assistance; (ii) living
 17   II,     5.  9.  5|             implement a clinical and financial strategic plan for performance
 18   II,     6.  3.  2|           specific legislation and a financial investment at both national
 19   II,     7.  4    |              In addition to the huge financial burden on health and welfare
 20   II,     9        |           2000). Alcohol exacerbates financial difficulties, childcare
 21   II,     9.  1.  2|               provision, quality and financial cost of medical, social
 22   II,     9.  1.  2|               provision, quality and financial cost of prenatal screening
 23   II,     9.  3.  1|           2000). Alcohol exacerbates financial difficulties, childcare
 24   II,     9.  3.  1|            to implementation, as the financial and human resource costs
 25   II,     9.  4.  1|           accessibility, quality and financial sustainability (European
 26   II,     9.  4.  5|       relatives for help and care or financial assistance; (ii) living
 27   II,     9.  4.  5|            of which often exceed the financial resources of a patient and
 28   II,     9.  4.  5|       demographic, technological and financial trends that may represent
 29   II,     9.  4.  5|            of quality of care; and~· financial sustainability of care systems.~ ~
 30   II,     9.  4.  5|     questions of access, quality and financial sustainability. For this
 31   II,     9.  4.  5|           tools.~ ~For what concerns financial sustainability, Member States
 32   II,     9.  4.  6|             family. For example, the financial cost of placing people with
 33   II,     9.  4.  6|         health, environment, social, financial etc…) for the changing population
 34   II,     9.  5.  3|             that alcohol exacerbates financial difficulties, childcare
 35   II,     9.  5.  4|             Fund for Women, provides financial and technical assistance
 36  III,    10.  2.  1|             a child grows up through financial strain, poor parenting,
 37  III,    10.  2.  1|          important public health and financial consequences in the near
 38  III,    10.  3.  1|            or by offering additional financial support for remediation
 39  III,    10.  3.  4|             from flooding or offered financial incentives for citizens
 40  III,    10.  5.  1|          appointment procedures, and financial constrains. Conditions requiring
 41  III,    10.  5.  3|         overall benefitsincluding financial savings - of health promotion
 42  III,    10.  5.  3|             References~ ~Aldana StG, Financial Impact of Health Promotion
 43  III,    10.  6.  2|             food and housing require financial prosperity. Educational
 44  III,    10.  6.  2|         population coverage, address financial barriers towards care, emphasize
 45   IV,    11.  1.  1|             fair distribution of the financial burden to operate the systems.~ ~
 46   IV,    11.  1.  4|             also the distribution of financial burden across income groups
 47   IV,    11.  1.  4|              is also contingent upon financial factors, such as the degree
 48   IV,    11.  1.  4|              to reduce or remove the financial burden from those not, or
 49   IV,    11.  1.  5|            enforce these guidelines, financial incentives (or disincentives)
 50   IV,    11.  1.  5|             quality of care~ ~Direct financial incentives to improve quality
 51   IV,    11.  1.  5|            30%. Linking sanctions or financial incentives to outcomes is
 52   IV,    11.  1.  5|       example, it is unclear whether financial incentives are sufficient
 53   IV,    11.  1.  5|            the link between targeted financial incentives and the behaviour
 54   IV,    11.  1.  5|             assessing the effects of financial incentives on physician
 55   IV,    11.  1.  5|              the economic rewards of financial incentives, doctors are
 56   IV,    11.  1.  5|           are no longer motivated by financial incentives i.e. no linear
 57   IV,    11.  1.  5|          important lessons regarding financial incentives that can be taken
 58   IV,    11.  1.  5|             be inappropriate to link financial rewards to complex diagnostic
 59   IV,    11.  1.  5|           highlighting the human and financial costs of medical errors.
 60   IV,    11.  1.  6|             and there were estimated financial savings. In Italy, costs
 61   IV,    11.  1.  6|        packages because of increased financial transparency, and hospital
 62   IV,    11.  3.  1|         Hurst, 2006) or cultural and financial reasons.~ ~Table 11.6. Numbers
 63   IV,    11.  3.  1|              in rural health issues. Financial incentives related to training,
 64   IV,    11.  3.  1|              in Austria and Germany. Financial incentives linked to the
 65   IV,    11.  3.  2|            of generics. For example, financial incentives for pharmacists
 66   IV,    11.  3.  2|               in the Czech Republic) financial incentives are instead placed
 67   IV,    11.  5.  6|            2002. Article 21 bans any financial aspect in this domain. The
 68   IV,    11.  6.  2|           goals outlined by the WHO: financial protection, equity in financing,
 69   IV,    11.  6.  2|           countries. This undermines financial protection. In some countries
 70   IV,    11.  6.  2|       application remains limited by financial, political and technical
 71   IV,    11.  6.  2|         placing a relatively heavier financial burden on lower income groups (
 72   IV,    11.  6.  2|           taxation may also increase financial protection and equity of
 73   IV,    11.  6.  2|            patients and to shift the financial risk to the providers in
 74   IV,    11.  6.  2|          salary alone to relieve the financial burden on the labour market (
 75   IV,    11.  6.  2|           tax bracket increases, the financial benefit also increases.~ ~ ~
 76   IV,    11.  6.  2|            two ways: by shifting the financial burden onto the individual,
 77   IV,    11.  6.  3|              The distribution of the financial burden and the degree of
 78   IV,    11.  6.  4|               in order to spread the financial risk across the population,
 79   IV,    11.  6.  4|           selection and to shift the financial risk onto the providers).
 80   IV,    11.  6.  4|              funds still have strong financial incentives towards risk
 81   IV,    11.  6.  5|              al. (2000): "Effects of financial incentives on medical practice:
 82   IV,    11.  6.  5|             s about more than money: financial incentives and internal
 83   IV,    11.  6.  5|    alternatives to WHO's fairness of financial contribution index." Health
 84   IV,    11.  6.  5|        Walley T, Mossialos E (2004): Financial incentives and prescribing.
 85   IV,    12.  2    |              together with available financial and other resources available
 86   IV,    12.  3    |            Member Statescommunity financial resources (e.g. structural
 87   IV,    12.  4    |         health objectives.~A list of financial community instruments relevant
 88   IV,    12.  4    |          Table 12.8.~ ~ ~Table 12.8. Financial community instruments relevant
 89   IV,    12.  4    |             relevant for health~ ~DG~Financial instrument~AGRI~Nutrition
 90   IV,    12.  8    |           2005. The EEA and Norway’s Financial Mechanism plays a complementary
 91   IV,    12.  8    |            the EEA and the Norwegian Financial mechanisms, can help bridge
 92   IV,    12. 10    |            projects are supported by financial grants as well as research
 93   IV,    12. 10    |            Sickness Funds can grant (financial) incentives to their members
 94   IV,    12. 10    |         publish an annual report and financial statement. ~Restructuring
 95   IV,    12. 10    |            by 50% and readjusted the financial criteria for its dispensation.
 96   IV,    12. 10    |    technologies, namely by providing financial support to infertility treatments.~ ~ ~ ~
 97   IV,    12. 10    |              households on long-term financial benefit~ ~Percentage of
 98   IV,    12. 10    |              Domain of objective 2~ ~Financial family policy~Financial
 99   IV,    12. 10    |              Financial family policy~Financial old age policy~Compensation
100   IV,    13.  3    | Directorate-General for Economic and Financial Affairs, released a Communication
101   IV,    13.  5    |         population coverage, address financial barriers to care, emphasize