Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  5.  3|             Although an improvement in perinatal care and the increasing
 2   II,     9        |               factors for newborns and perinatal health~ ~High maternal age
 3   II,     9        |        characteristics affect rates of perinatal mortality and morbidity (
 4   II,     9        |               between maternal age and perinatal health outcomes is U-shaped
 5   II,     9        |         mothers, the increased risk of perinatal mortality is associated
 6   II,     9        |          harmful effects of smoking on perinatal outcomes, in particular
 7   II,     9        |           effects concern not only the perinatal period but also the infant’
 8   II,     9        |              health services. Finally, perinatal health outcomes are linked
 9   II,     9        |               the impact of smoking on perinatal outcomes, however, because
10   II,     9.  1    |                      9.1. Newborns and perinatal health.~ ~ ~ ~More than
11   II,     9.  1    |            severe impairments, many of perinatal origin (Cans et al, 2003).
12   II,     9.  1    |              with complications of the perinatal period, including pre-term
13   II,     9.  1    |            birth, low birth weight and perinatal death. Nevertheless, Europe
14   II,     9.  1    |             and pressing challenges in perinatal health, namely: to maximise
15   II,     9.  1    |             effectively. Approaches to perinatal healthcare differ greatly
16   II,     9.  1.  1|               on rates of death in the perinatal period, the causes of infant
17   II,     9.  1.  1|             the development and use of perinatal health indicators. Today,
18   II,     9.  1.  1|              health indicators. Today, perinatal, infant and maternal mortality
19   II,     9.  1.  1|                limits to the available perinatal health data, however. As
20   II,     9.  1.  1|               health data, however. As perinatal and maternal health have
21   II,     9.  1.  1|              monitoring and describing perinatal health in Europe. The EURO-PERISTAT
22   II,     9.  1.  1|           extensive review of existing perinatal health indicators using
23   II,     9.  1.  1|                essential to monitoring perinatal health, recommended indicators
24   II,     9.  1.  1|               more complete picture of perinatal health across the member
25   II,     9.  1.  1|         represent important aspects of perinatal health, but require additional
26   II,     9.  1.  1|              at 5 minutes~F: Causes of perinatal death/deaths due to congenital
27   II,     9.  1.  1|         understanding of key issues in perinatal health.~ ~
28   II,     9.  1.  1|        conditions originating from the perinatal period are grouped together,
29   II,     9.  1.  1|              on the specific causes of perinatal deaths. Nonetheless, these
30   II,     9.  1.  1|          conditions originating in the perinatal period, mainly prematurity
31   II,     9.  1.  1|             infant mortality declines, perinatal causes are responsible for
32   II,     9.  1.  1|               important for evaluating perinatal health outcomes. Very preterm
33   II,     9.  1.  1|               association with adverse perinatal events. CP is an umbrella
34   II,     9.  1.  1|          factors~ ~In order to monitor perinatal health trends and understand
35   II,     9.  1.  1|       inequalities in mortality in the perinatal period between the countries
36   II,     9.  1.  1|                through 2000: impact on perinatal mortality. Am J Obstet Gynecol
37   II,     9.  1.  1|            congenital malformations to perinatal mortality. A 10 years prospective
38   II,     9.  1.  1|        Oosterbaan HP, Eskes TK (2000): Perinatal audit on avoidable mortality
39   II,     9.  1.  1|                 700-7.~Garne E (2001): Perinatal mortality rates can no longer
40   II,     9.  1.  1|               for comparing quality of perinatal health services between
41   II,     9.  1.  1|            Odland JO, Forde OH (2000): Perinatal deaths in a Norwegian county
42   II,     9.  1.  1|        classified by the Nordic-Baltic perinatal classification: geographical
43   II,     9.  1.  1|            Study Group of the Canadian Perinatal Surveillance System. Jama
44   II,     9.  1.  1|                YW, Croughan MS (2004): Perinatal outcomes in singletons following
45   II,     9.  1.  1|            Study Group of the Canadian Perinatal Surveillance System. Jama
46   II,     9.  1.  1|                Collaborative Effort on Perinatal and Infant Mortality. Papers
47   II,     9.  1.  1|             International Symposium on Perinatal and Infant Mortality. Bethesday,
48   II,     9.  1.  1|              monitoring and evaluating perinatal health in Europe: criteria,
49   II,     9.  1.  2|                Anomalies, 1992-2004.~ ~Perinatal mortality and termination
50   II,     9.  1.  2|               important contributor to perinatal mortality. The overall recorded
51   II,     9.  1.  2|             000 births, giving a total perinatal mortality rate associated
52   II,     9.  1.  2|              subgroups contributing to perinatal mortality are congenital
53   II,     9.  1.  2|       congenital heart disease (23% of perinatal deaths with anomaly), nervous
54   II,     9.  1.  2|               system anomalies (19% of perinatal deaths with anomaly), and
55   II,     9.  1.  2|           categories.~ ~Table 9.1.2.2. Perinatal mortality due to congenital
56   II,     9.  1.  2|                anomalies, 2000-2004.~ ~Perinatal mortality due to congenital
57   II,     9.  1.  2| underascertained. The highest rates of perinatal mortality associated to
58   II,     9.  1.  2|               is illegal, and thus the perinatal mortality rate includes
59   II,     9.  1.  2|              TOPFA) to all births, and Perinatal Mortality per 1 000 births,
60   II,     9.  1.  2|            total mortality (TOPFA plus perinatal) between countries probably
61   II,     9.  1.  2|               factors for newborns and perinatal health~ ~ ~High maternal
62   II,     9.  1.  2|        characteristics affect rates of perinatal mortality and morbidity (
63   II,     9.  1.  2|               between maternal age and perinatal health outcomes is U-shaped
64   II,     9.  1.  2|         mothers, the increased risk of perinatal mortality is associated
65   II,     9.  1.  2|          harmful effects of smoking on perinatal outcomes, in particular
66   II,     9.  1.  2|           effects concern not only the perinatal period but also the infant’
67   II,     9.  1.  2|              health services. Finally, perinatal health outcomes are linked
68   II,     9.  1.  2|               the impact of smoking on perinatal outcomes, however, because
69   II,     9.  1.  2|              Mothers?", Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, Vol 21, pp
70   II,     9.  1.  2|                Bailey JA et al (2006): Perinatal mortality and congenital
71   II,     9.  2.  2|             option. However, after the perinatal period children do not feature
72   II,     9.  2.  6|           projects on child safety and perinatal health. Given that background,
73   II,     9.  3.  2|          factors~ ~In order to monitor perinatal health trends - including
74   II,     9.  3.  2|       countries have documented poorer perinatal health outcomes for migrant
75   II,     9.  3.  2|       technologies associated with the perinatal period continue to advance
76   II,     9.  3.  2|           comparisons of health in the perinatal period at European level.
77   II,     9.  3.  2|            European approaches towards perinatal care. Some countries, such
78   II,     9.  3.  2|               medical practices in the perinatal period. All countries face
79   II,     9.  3.  2|                through 2000: impact on perinatal mortality. Am J Obstet Gynecol
80   II,     9.  3.  2|            congenital malformations to perinatal mortality. A 10 years prospective
81   II,     9.  3.  2|        Oosterbaan HP, Eskes TK (2000): Perinatal audit on avoidable mortality
82   II,     9.  3.  2|               700-7.~ ~Garne E (2001): Perinatal mortality rates can no longer
83   II,     9.  3.  2|               for comparing quality of perinatal health services between
84   II,     9.  3.  2|            Odland JO, Forde OH (2000): Perinatal deaths in a Norwegian county
85   II,     9.  3.  2|        classified by the Nordic-Baltic perinatal classification: geographical
86   II,     9.  3.  2|                YW, Croughan MS (2004): Perinatal outcomes in singletons following
87   II,     9.  3.  2|            Study Group of the Canadian Perinatal Surveillance System. Jama
88   II,     9.  3.  2|               in the interpretation of perinatal mortality statistics. In:
89   II,     9.  3.  2|                Collaborative Effort on Perinatal and Infant Mortality. Papers
90   II,     9.  3.  2|             International Symposium on Perinatal and Infant Mortality. Bethesday,
91   II,     9.  3.  2|              monitoring and evaluating perinatal health in Europe: criteria,
92  III,    10.  3.  2|             cancer in adult life after perinatal exposure (Barton et al,
93  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|       peri-conceptional~peri-menopause~perinatal~perineum~periodontal~periodontitis~