Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.  2    |         agricultural products and live animals (61%) and foodstuffs
 2    I,     2.  4    |          poor, it is because they live in jobless or low work-intensity
 3    I,     2.  5    |           the necessary papers to live and work in the host country
 4    I,     2.  7    |      small jewel created on water live in houses with green roofs
 5   II,     4.  1    |        average, about 67 years to live and currently around 70,
 6   II,     4.  1    |         severe limitations. Women live on average 6 years longer
 7   II,     4.  1    |        Above the age of 50, women live longer than men, 4.9 years
 8   II,     4.  1    |         of the EU25 can expect to live slightly more than 60 years
 9   II,     4.  1    |          at birth are expected to live 6 years more than men. They
10   II,     4.  1    |          than men. They will also live 4 years more with activity
11   II,     5.  1.  3|       with health care providers, live healthily, and maintain
12   II,     5.  2.  5|       2007). Low risk individuals live longer and are eligible
13   II,     5.  5.  2|           as possible, be able to live independent autonomous lives
14   II,     5.  5.  2|          financial matters and to live in an autonomous manner
15   II,     5.  5.  2|          people have the right to live and work in other member
16   II,     5.  5.  3|         of severely ill people to live successfully in the community
17   II,     5.  5.  3|      really matters is how people live, if they are able to establish
18   II,     5.  5.  3|          social relationships, to live with a partner etc. Therefore,
19   II,     5.  5.  3|   advanced PD patients supposedly live in nursing homes.~A further
20   II,     5. 14.  3|           than elderly people who live in their own homes. Other
21   II,     6.  3.  5|        many are changing from the live vaccine to inactivated vaccines
22   II,     7.  1    |           Europe a safer place to live in for its population. Both
23   II,     7.  4    |           Europe a safer place to live in, the Council Recommendation
24   II,     7.  4.  1|           young people aged 1524 live in the EU representing 15%
25   II,     8.  2.  1|        disabilities are likely to live in the community and it
26   II,     9        |           well-off people tend to live in more harmful environments
27   II,     9.  1    |          only 5 to 15 per 100 000 live births – but are associated
28   II,     9.  1.  1|          in a given year per 1000 live and stillbirths in the same
29   II,     9.  1.  1|           days after birth) after live birth at or after 22 complete
30   II,     9.  1.  1|          year, expressed per 1000 live births in the same year.
31   II,     9.  1.  1|         deaths (at 0-6 days after live birth) and late neonatal
32   II,     9.  1.  1|        deaths (at 7-27 days after live birth).~Comparisons of the
33   II,     9.  1.  1|          deaths (day 0-364) after live birth at or after 22 completed
34   II,     9.  1.  1|           year expressed per 1000 live births in the same year.~
35   II,     9.  1.  1|           Between 4 and 9% of all live births have a birth weight
36   II,     9.  1.  1|     Figure 9.1.1.3. Percentage of live births with a birth weight
37   II,     9.  1.  1|           in 1.5 to 2.5 per 1 000 live births. Cerebral Palsy is
38   II,     9.  1.  1|       countries, is 2.0 per 1 000 live births. As shown in Table
39   II,     9.  1.  1|    Cerebral palsy rates per 1 000 live births in selected EUGLOREH
40   II,     9.  1.  1|      below 1500g. VLBW rate among live births is not rare; it has
41   II,     9.  1.  1|          on average, 94 per 1 000 live births during the period
42   II,     9.  1.  1|         country from 26 per 1 000 live births (Lithuania) up to
43   II,     9.  1.  1|    Lithuania) up to 164 per 1 000 live births (Ireland). This variation
44   II,     9.  1.  1|   survival rates in 860 singleton live births at 24 and 25 weeks
45   II,     9.  1.  2|           Trends in the total and live birth prevalence per 1 000
46   II,     9.  1.  2|         anomaly across Europe are live born children who survive
47   II,     9.  1.  2|    Congenital heart disease~ ~The live birth prevalence of congenital
48   II,     9.  1.  2|           Trends in the total and live birth prevalence per 1 000
49   II,     9.  1.  2|         by EUROCAT registers, the live birth prevalence of Down
50   II,     9.  1.  2|       over four-fold variation in live birth prevalence of Down
51   II,     9.  1.  2|          Table 9.1.2.4. Total and live birth prevalence per 1 000
52   II,     9.  1.  2|           Trends in the total and live birth prevalence per 1 000
53   II,     9.  1.  2|          a very wide variation in live birth prevalence rates,
54   II,     9.  3.  1|  disorders~ ~In part because they live longer than men, women are
55   II,     9.  3.  2|     deaths and the denominator is live born children. This denominator
56   II,     9.  3.  2|       maternal deaths per 100 000 live births in the early 1980s
57   II,     9.  3.  2|           of all women delivering live and still-born babies: (
58   II,     9.  3.  2|           from about 150 per 1000 live births to 300 per 1000 live
59   II,     9.  3.  2|       live births to 300 per 1000 live births. This practice has
60   II,     9.  3.  2|   survival rates in 860 singleton live births at 24 and 25 weeks
61   II,     9.  4.  2|         varies dramatically. Some live to be fit and healthy into
62   II,     9.  4.  2|           individual’s ability to live independently. People with
63   II,     9.  4.  3|          that, on average, people live longer and more healthy
64   II,     9.  4.  3|          30% of those over 65 who live independently experience
65   II,     9.  4.  4|           well-off people tend to live in more harmful environments
66   II,     9.  4.  5|       possible (WHO, 1999). Women live to well over 80 in many
67   II,     9.  4.  5|     Health Inequalities. As women live longer than men, they are
68   II,     9.  4.  5|           are also more likely to live alone than older men. In
69   II,     9.  4.  6|           the person’s ability to live in his/her own home independently
70   II,     9.  4.  6|       support for helping them to live independently. With a move
71   II,     9.  5.  1|           of those with whom they live and work.~ ~A reduction
72   II,     9.  5.  3|           biological potential to live longer than men.~ ~Carers:
73  III,    10.  1    | disadvantaged populations who may live in more polluted environments
74  III,    10.  1    |           certain populations who live in increasingly agricultural
75  III,    10.  2.  1|           They are more likely to live in neighbourhoods with poor
76  III,    10.  2.  1|       environment in which people live but also other settings –
77  III,    10.  3.  1|       about 15% of the population live in areas where exposure
78  III,    10.  4.  2|       meat products, biotoxins in live molluscs, Trichinella in
79  III,    10.  5.  1|           a range of species that live in the city but need to
80  III,    10.  5.  1|        such as rats and mice that live in public parks and in the
81  III,    10.  5.  3|           the necessary papers to live and work in the host country
82   IV,    11.  1.  3|           allowing individuals to live longer, healthier lives,
83   IV,    12.  2    |        the process of learning to live with diabetes, the person
84   IV,    12.  2    |           be assisted to learn to live with diabetes. Behaviour
85   IV,    12.  2    |         of the world’s population live in countries that fully
86   IV,    12. 10    |       easy, fun and obtainable to live a healthy life. The materials,
87   IV,    12. 10    |         pools) makes it easier to live a physical active life.
88   IV,    12. 10    |          possible to where people live.~· Equitable access for
89   IV,    12. 10    |          people who can no longer live at home. Where residential care
90   IV,    13.  2.  3| disadvantaged populations who may live in more polluted environments
91   IV,    13.  2.  3|           certain populations who live in increasingly agricultural
92   IV,    13.  3    |            Some 8% of EU citizens live at a risk of poverty despite