Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.  9    |               is a risk of additional outbreaks of Chikungunya (a virus
 2    I,     2.  9    |         water- and food-borne disease outbreaks are expected to become more
 3   II,     5. 11.  5|     Infectious skin diseases, such as outbreaks of fungal infections of
 4   II,     6.  3.  1|          systems was the detection of outbreaks and not the production of
 5   II,     6.  3.  1|              immune. Country-specific outbreaks (vCJD and avian influenza)
 6   II,     6.  3.  1|   consequences of recent high profile outbreaks,~ ~has given a new impetus,
 7   II,     6.  3.  2|      important pathogens;~· detecting outbreaks and/or spread of different ‘
 8   II,     6.  3.  3|           year in 2004, mainly due to outbreaks in large cities involving
 9   II,     6.  3.  4|       individuals. Sporadic cases and outbreaks occur worldwide. The most
10   II,     6.  3.  5|              despite all the efforts, outbreaks still occur in population
11   II,     6.  3.  5|              for the re-emergence and outbreaks of certain diseases. Examples
12   II,     6.  3.  6|              multinational food-borne outbreaks are much more difficult
13   II,     6.  3.  6| Cryptosporidium has caused waterborne outbreaks in several Member States.
14   II,     6.  3.  6|        susceptible to this virus, and outbreaks are still seen in several
15   II,     6.  3.  6|             the Union. It may be that outbreaks caused by norovirus in confined
16   II,     6.  3.  6|             also to the occurrence of outbreaks. A global epidemic of egg-related
17   II,     6.  3.  6|             incidence. A total of six outbreaks were monitored in 2005,
18   II,     6.  3.  6|           environment, and food-borne outbreaks have been detected worldwide.
19   II,     6.  3.  6|              several large waterborne outbreaks have occurred in Europe.
20   II,     6.  3.  6|            immuno-deficient patients. Outbreaks have been reported in child
21   II,     6.  3.  7|             establish surveillance of outbreaks, monitor risk factors and
22   II,     6.  3.  7|         central Europe. It appears in outbreaks at intervals of several
23   II,     6.  3.  7|           these diseases are prone to outbreaks, which always attract a
24   II,     6.  3.  7|              10 years, indigenous WNV outbreaks have been documented in
25   II,     6.  3.  7|             may die. In recent years, outbreaks have been reported in Turkey,
26   II,     6.  3.  7|       Yellow fever has not caused any outbreaks in Europe for more than
27   II,     6.  4.  1|          early detection of potential outbreaks, and help to identify disease
28   II,     6.  4.  2|          States and the Commission on outbreaks with greater than national
29   II,     6.  4.  2|              used for notification of outbreaks, exchange of information
30   II,     6.  4.  4|        verification and assessment of outbreaks and for collecting, processing
31   II,     6.  4.  4|              official notification of outbreaks and measures as well as
32   II,     6.  4.  5|               avert the occurrence of outbreaks of communicable diseases,
33   II,     9.  2.  3|      immunisation loses priority, and outbreaks of diseases such as measles
34   II,     9.  2.  3|               It is also thought that outbreaks may be due less to lack
35   II,     9.  2.  6|           reviewed to counter renewed outbreaks.~ ~In later life, the health
36  III,    10.  2.  1|         Latvia and Lithuania, serious outbreaks occurred as recently as
37  III,    10.  3.  3|             to this virus and smaller outbreaks are still seen in several
38  III,    10.  3.  3|             the Union. It may be that outbreaks caused by norovirus in confined
39  III,    10.  3.  3| Cryptosporidium has caused waterborne outbreaks in several Member States.
40  III,    10.  3.  4|        rainfall on waterborne disease outbreaks, extreme rainfall and runoff
41  III,    10.  3.  4|   drinking-water reservoirs . Notable outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis have
42  III,    10.  3.  4|      uninterrupted. Although no major outbreaks had been reported, contamination
43  III,    10.  4.  2|           contaminants and food-borne outbreaks.~ ~
44  III,    10.  4.  2|             resistance and food-borne outbreaks and publish an annual Community
45  III,    10.  4.  2|          agents thereof.~ ~Food-borne outbreaks and antimicrobial resistance
46  III,    10.  4.  2|            cases linked to food-borne outbreaks will still be reported under
47  III,    10.  4.  2|              States to rapidly notify outbreaks of the many infectious animal
48  III,    10.  4.  2|              and the Commission about outbreaks of these animal diseases
49  III,    10.  4.  2|              allows the monitoring of outbreaks of contagious animal diseases
50  III,    10.  4.  2|              summary of the number of outbreaks and the date of the last
51  III,    10.  4.  2|           showing the location of the outbreaks and summary data sent to
52  III,    10.  4.  2|       Zoonotic diseases and food-born outbreaks in the EU~ ~ ~Disease/micro-organism~
53  III,    10.  4.  2|          important cause of food-born outbreaks~Growing~Fruit and vegetables~
54  III,    10.  4.  2|             resistance and food-borne outbreaks to the European Commission
55  III,    10.  4.  2|        important causes of food-borne outbreaks. For Salmonella outbreaks
56  III,    10.  4.  2|             outbreaks. For Salmonella outbreaks egg products and broiler
57  III,    10.  4.  2|          infection. For Campylobacter outbreaks broiler meat remained the
58  III,    10.  4.  2|             the largest Campylobacter outbreaks were caused by contaminated
59  III,    10.  4.  2|            agents of food-borne virus outbreaks. The most common sources
60  III,    10.  4.  2|     harmonisation of the reporting on outbreaks would improve the quality
61  III,    10.  4.  2|             resistance nad food borne outbreaks in the European Union. The
62  III,    10.  4.  3|              on water-related disease outbreaks in Europe and on the specific
63  III,    10.  4.  3|              36.~ ~The information on outbreaks is patchy and related to
64  III,    10.  4.  3|             there were 90 water-borne outbreaks resulting in >12 000 episodes
65  III,    10.  4.  3|         reported drinking water-borne outbreaks in selected countries, 2000–
66  III,    10.  4.  3|       responsible for 45 (60%) of the outbreaks and 34.8% of the cases of
67  III,    10.  4.  3|          agents were implicated in 20 outbreaks (27%) and 60.6% of cases
68  III,    10.  4.  3|             of cases of illness. Four outbreaks were caused by protozoa (
69  III,    10.  4.  3|            rather then differences in outbreaks; moreover, data was available
70  III,    10.  4.  3|              of water related disease outbreaks is often a breakdown or
71  III,    10.  4.  3|           nitrite. Waterborne disease outbreaks occur throughout the European
72  III,    10.  4.  5|               the bathers themselves. Outbreaks associated with recreational
73  III,    10.  5.  1|             and water-related disease outbreaks triggered by biological
74  III,    10.  5.  1|          Finland, food and waterborne outbreaks have been recorded annually
75  III,    10.  5.  1|      monitoring system for waterborne outbreaks was launched and municipal
76  III,    10.  5.  1|             now obliged to report all outbreaks of suspected waterborne
77  III,    10.  5.  1|          Institute; even the smallest outbreaks, such as outbreaks related
78  III,    10.  5.  1|           smallest outbreaks, such as outbreaks related to the use of private
79  III,    10.  5.  1|           reporting only zero to four outbreaks were reported annually,
80  III,    10.  5.  1|             single exception of seven outbreaks in one year, from 1998 to
81  III,    10.  5.  1|               four and ten waterborne outbreaks were observed each year.
82  III,    10.  5.  1|              each year. A total of 52 outbreaks (which resulted in over
83  III,    10.  5.  1|           period. The majority of the outbreaks occurred in communities
84  III,    10.  5.  1|             as public water supplies, outbreaks of disease are common. Between
85  III,    10.  5.  1|           2000 there were 25 reported outbreaks of infection associated
86  III,    10.  5.  1|              was implicated in 52% of outbreaks (Said et al, 2003).~In many
87  III,    10.  5.  1|               93, p 288~Said B et al. Outbreaks of infectious disease associated
88   IV,    12. 10    |       infections~ ~Number of reported outbreaks transmitted in drinking
89  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|  osteoarthritis~osteoporosis~outbreak~outbreaks~outcome~outcomes~outdoor~