Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.  4    |    healthcare interventions (e.g. hypertension detection and treatment,
 2   II,     5.  1.  1|         role: to give an example, hypertension, smoking habit and excessive
 3   II,     5.  1.  1| cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, hypertension, diabetes and smoking are
 4   II,     5.  1.  1|           database (htt 7) were : hypertension, hypercholesterol, obesity,
 5   II,     5.  1.  1|       adopted in risk definition (hypertension and hypercholesterol) and
 6   II,     5.  1.  1|           End Stage Renal Disease~Hypertension and diabetes, obesity and
 7   II,     5.  2.  2|         role: to give an example, hypertension, smoking habit and excessive
 8   II,     5.  2.  2| cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, hypertension, diabetes and smoking are
 9   II,     5.  2.  2|   population level were selected: hypertension, hypercholesterol, obesity,
10   II,     5.  2.  2|       adopted in risk definition (hypertension and hypercholesterol) and
11   II,     5.  2.  3|     improvement in the control of hypertension; there is evidence suggesting
12   II,     5.  2.  4|     important factor, followed by hypertension, obesity, smoking habit,
13   II,     5.  2.  4|          recent available data on hypertension prevalence by age range.
14   II,     5.  2.  4|        range. It seems clear that hypertension prevalence increases with
15   II,     5.  2.  4|    criteria for the definition of hypertension prevalence ( 160 o 95 mmHg;
16   II,     5.  2.  4|           Estimated prevalence of hypertension for men and women of different
17   II,     5.  2.  4|           risk factor definition (hypertension and hypercholesterolemia)
18   II,     5.  2.  4|         factors’ such as smoking, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes,
19   II,     5.  2.  4|       prevalence of patients with hypertension undergoing adequate treatment
20   II,     5.  2.  5|  individual risk factors (such as hypertension and hypercholesterolemia)
21   II,     5.  2.  6|    pressure and isolated systolic hypertension and the risk of coronary
22   II,     5.  2.  7|        Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet. DASH-Sodium
23   II,     5.  4.  1|       tends to be associated with hypertension, (high blood pressure) and
24   II,     5.  4.  1|          levels (hyperglycaemia), hypertension and the change in lipids
25   II,     5.  6.  3|        cardiovascular disease and hypertension; formal education; socio-economic
26   II,     5.  7.  1|          chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular
27   II,     5.  7.  3|         of dialysis were similar, hypertension and cardiovascular mortality
28   II,     5.  7.  4|             5.7.4. Risk factors~ ~Hypertension and diabetes (Levin 2001),
29   II,     5.  7.  4|         true for diseases such as hypertension (Diez Roux et al, 2002)
30   II,     5.  7.  7|   clinical practice guidelines on hypertension and antihypertensive agents
31   II,     5.  7.  7|      Epidemiology and Prevention. Hypertension 2003;42(5):1050-65.~Seligman
32   II,     5.  8.  3|           case of COPD, pulmonary hypertension and consequent heart failure.~•
33   II,     5.  8.  3|            allergy, osteoporosis, hypertension, digestive ulcer, articular
34   II,     5.  8.  3|       2005). These were diabetes, hypertension, obesity, stroke, hyper-lipidemia,
35   II,     5. 11.  4|      disorders such as angina and hypertension.~ ~High economic costs~Although
36   II,     9        |       including pregnancy induced hypertension, preterm labor, caesarean
37   II,     9        |       neonatal conditions such as hypertension, pre-eclampsia and fetal
38   II,     9        |         and include dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cigarette
39   II,     9        |    factors, such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking,
40   II,     9        |           more closely related to hypertension (which is probably their
41   II,     9.  1.  1|          adult illnesses, such as hypertension and diabetes. This life-course
42   II,     9.  1.  2|       including pregnancy induced hypertension, preterm labor, caesarean
43   II,     9.  1.  2|       neonatal conditions such as hypertension, pre-eclampsia and fetal
44   II,     9.  2.  3|   non-insulin-dependent diabetes, hypertension and sleep apnoea, and can
45   II,     9.  2.  3|           1.1 million suffer from hypertension; and 1.2 million suffer
46   II,     9.  2.  3|         or more of the following: hypertension, central adiposity, raised
47   II,     9.  3.  1|           co-morbidities, such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus, which
48   II,     9.  3.  1|       such as obesity, stress and hypertension in diabetic women (European
49   II,     9.  3.  1|        levels and treating severe hypertension can reduce the incidence
50   II,     9.  3.  1|          2005). The prevalence of hypertension in Member States appears
51   II,     9.  3.  1|       European Commission, 2003). Hypertension is both a disease in itself
52   II,     9.  3.  1|         higher risk of developing hypertension, hyperlipidaemia and diabetes
53   II,     9.  3.  1|          of co-morbidity, such as hypertension, obesity, metabolic syndrome
54   II,     9.  3.  1|         and include dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cigarette
55   II,     9.  3.  1|    factors, such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking,
56   II,     9.  3.  1|           more closely related to hypertension (which is probably their
57   II,     9.  3.  2|      fluid embolism, haemorrhage, hypertension, infections/sepsis, obstetrical
58   II,     9.  4.  3|           osteoporosis, diabetes, hypertension, incontinence and arthritis.
59   II,     9.  4.  3|       than half, through systolic hypertension control (Geriatric Medicine
60  III,    10.  1.  3|  Committee on Atherosclerosis and Hypertension in Children, Council on
61  III,    10.  2.  1|   cholesterol levels in blood and hypertension (Keil U, et al., 1998).~
62  III,    10.  2.  1|      cavity, haemorrhagic stroke, hypertension, pancreatitis and breast
63  III,    10.  2.  1|         and increases the risk of hypertension and haemorrhagic stroke
64  III,    10.  2.  1|           as type II diabetes and hypertension in adolescents, foretell
65  III,    10.  2.  1|         of abdominal obesity with hypertension, dyslipidaemia and impaired
66  III,    10.  6.  2|          care interventions (e.g. hypertension detection and treatment,
67   IV,    11.  5.  4|         donor age or a history of hypertension and diabetes.~ ~Public awareness
68   IV,    11.  6.  4|      burden of illness: diabetes, hypertension, TB, AIDS (84.5% based on
69   IV,    12.  2    |  individual risk factors (such as hypertension and hypercholesterolemia)
70   IV,    12. 10    |           Intermediate~Regional~ ~Hypertension~High ~National/Regional~ ~
71   IV,    12. 10    |           and public health~ ~ ~ ~Hypertension~ ~ ~ ~ ~Interactions amongst
72   IV,    12. 10    |         Biowissenschaften, www ~ ~Hypertension~High priority25 SGB V
73   IV,    12. 10    |          e.g. DMP CVD, structured hypertension training~Bloodpressure is
74   IV,    12. 10    |         and public health~Low~ ~ ~Hypertension~Intermediate~ ~A campaign
75   IV,    12. 10    |           familiarise public with hypertension and the measures for the
76   IV,    12. 10    |         prevention and control of hypertension ~ ~ ~ ~NATIONAL HEALTH STRATEGIES
77   IV,    12. 10    |    program there are actions for: Hypertension, Obesity, Cholesterol, Cancer,
78   IV,    12. 10    |  concerning the bioethics~http ~ ~Hypertension~ high~ ~ During each consultation
79   IV,    12. 10    |          Minister on 04.05.2007~ ~Hypertension~ ~Law 138/2004 established
80   IV,    12. 10    |        research of human genome~ ~Hypertension~ high~ ~Special target “
81   IV,    12. 10    |          under public discussion.~Hypertension~ High~Circular letter on
82   IV,    12. 10    |          control of AHT (Arterial Hypertension).~National Programme for
83   IV,    12. 10    |         committees is established~Hypertension~ Intermediate~ Law 95/2006
84   IV,    12. 10    |     public healh~No indicator~ ~ ~Hypertension~No indicator~ ~Interactions
85   IV,    12. 10    | Intermediate~ At national level~ ~Hypertension~ High~ At national level~
86   IV,    12. 10    |           European Guidelines for Hypertension Diagnostics and Therapy /
87   IV,    13.  2.  3|        use, 10.9% attributable to hypertension, 7.4% and 7.4% to high cholesterol
88   IV,    13.  2.  3|       lower socioeconomic status. Hypertension, unfavourable blood lipid
89  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0| hyperlipidaemias~hypersensitivity~hypertension~hypertensive~hypogonadism~