Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  1.  1|         disease relate to poor oral hygiene, tobacco use, excessive
 2   II,     5.  9.  4|             further support for the hygiene hypothesis. Prevalence of
 3   II,     5.  9.  4|         according to the so calledHygiene Hypothesis” (Wang, 2006;
 4   II,     5.  9.  7|          Infection, allergy and the hygiene hypothesis: historical perspective.
 5   II,     5. 14.  4|       public health, including oral hygiene. The public health community
 6   II,     5. 14.  4|         disease relate to poor oral hygiene, tobacco use, excessive
 7   II,     5. 14.  5|            Although meticulous oral hygiene and appropriate dietary
 8   II,     6.  3.  4|      hand-washing, good respiratory hygiene, mask-wearing in healthcare
 9   II,     6.  3.  6|      include good personal and food hygiene.~ ~The overall incidence
10   II,     6.  3.  6| contaminated food or water. General hygiene measures are crucial, and
11   II,     6.  3.  6|            chain. In addition, good hygiene practices in meat processing
12   II,     6.  4.  5|           treatment and training on hygiene and infection control standards)
13   II,     7.  7    |              CERPRI), Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Medical
14   II,     7.  7    |              CERPRI), Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Medical
15   II,     9.  3.  1|          smoking cessation and oral hygiene self-care behaviours, such
16  III,    10.  2.  1|           10.2.1.5. Inadequate oral hygiene~ ~
17  III,    10.  2.  1|         controlled by personal oral hygiene in adults and children because
18  III,    10.  2.  1|          risk behaviours, i.e. oral hygiene practices, sugar consumption (
19  III,    10.  2.  1|       project, exist to assess oral hygiene, but unfortunately no data
20  III,    10.  2.  1|       analysis~ ~The Burden of oral hygiene~ ~As it might be expected,
21  III,    10.  2.  1|         consumption and use of oral hygiene products has been associated
22  III,    10.  2.  1|         associated to improved oral hygiene. International publications
23  III,    10.  2.  1|     programmes to promote good oral hygiene practice.(Petersen, 2003;
24  III,    10.  2.  1|      disparities in children’s oral hygiene in various countries; the
25  III,    10.  2.  1|          behaviours related to oral hygiene or linked to socio-economic
26  III,    10.  2.  1|            girls.~ ~Improved dental hygiene seems to have reduced gingivitis
27  III,    10.  2.  1|             age of 12 had poor oral hygiene (de Almeidia et al, 2003).
28  III,    10.  2.  1|          due to the improved dental hygiene observed in industrialised
29  III,    10.  2.  1|             Economic impact of oral hygiene~ ~The oral hygiene market
30  III,    10.  2.  1|             oral hygiene~ ~The oral hygiene market consists of various
31  III,    10.  2.  1|             area of the global oral hygiene market. The sale of toothpaste
32  III,    10.  2.  1|             5% of the European oral hygiene market. Total revenues of
33  III,    10.  2.  1|         revenues of the German oral hygiene market amounted to USD 1.
34  III,    10.  2.  1|         volume terms, sales of oral hygiene products decreased by an
35  III,    10.  2.  1|                 Behaviours and Oral Hygiene Data~ ~The large diffusion
36  III,    10.  2.  1|           general awareness of oral hygiene and oral healthcare products
37  III,    10.  2.  1|            applies despite the good hygiene habits reported in the previous
38  III,    10.  2.  1|             of plaque and good oral hygiene. Good hygiene should have
39  III,    10.  2.  1|             good oral hygiene. Good hygiene should have further benefits
40  III,    10.  2.  1|     prevented by good personal oral hygiene practices, including brushing
41  III,    10.  2.  1|          water fluoridation.~ ~Oral Hygiene Products~ ~While toothpaste
42  III,    10.  2.  1|        conscious consumer with oral hygiene solutions that fight plaque,
43  III,    10.  2.  1|         protective benefits of oral hygiene practices and consumption
44  III,    10.  2.  1|          the use of a range of oral hygiene products. Currently, there
45  III,    10.  2.  1|            in the Netherlands. Oral hygiene in Netherlands. London,
46  III,    10.  3.  4|        areas: water, sanitation and hygiene, vector control, epidemiological
47  III,    10.  4.  1|    including the increased level of hygiene in homes and the contribution
48  III,    10.  4.  2|           General Food Law~GHP~Good Hygiene Practice~GMO~Genetically
49  III,    10.  4.  2|     labelling, feed additives, feed hygiene; b) animal health and welfare:
50  III,    10.  4.  2|           encephalopathies; c) food hygiene: assure consistency and
51  III,    10.  4.  2|            852 and 853/2004 on food hygiene and a series of Directives
52  III,    10.  4.  2|      holistic approach towards food hygiene, covering all levels of
53  III,    10.  4.  2|          and applying a transparent hygiene policy to all food and feed
54  III,    10.  4.  2|             the application of Good Hygiene and Manufacturing Practices (
55  III,    10.  4.  2|             of 29 April 2004 on the hygiene of foodstuffs, Regulation (
56  III,    10.  4.  2|           2004 laying down specific hygiene rules for food of animal
57  III,    10.  4.  2|             of 29 April 2004 on the hygiene of foodstuffs. Official
58  III,    10.  4.  2|           2004 laying down specific hygiene rules for food of animal
59  III,    10.  4.  3|          poor water, sanitation and hygiene suggested that in these
60  III,    10.  5.  1|             crowding on sanitation, hygiene and infectious diseases
61  III,    10.  5.  1|          and inadequate sanitation/ hygiene equipment, may have important
62  III,    10.  5.  1|          While the health impact of hygiene pests such as ants and cockroaches
63  III,    10.  5.  1|       Sweden, 2004).~ ~Sanitation / hygiene equipment~ ~The supply of
64  III,    10.  5.  1|          water and the provision of hygiene and sanitation amenities
65  III,    10.  5.  1|       sewage system. In both cases, hygiene concerns are predominant
66   IV,    12. 10    |         High~Regional~ Yes~Personal hygiene~Intermediate~National/Regional~ ~
67   IV,    12. 10    |           Board of Health.~Personal hygiene~ ~ ~ ~Safety awareness~ ~ ~ ~
68   IV,    12. 10    |            started in 1987~Personal hygiene~Intermediate~ ~§ 21 SGB
69   IV,    12. 10    |      Publication of annual National Hygiene~Services Quality Review~(
70   IV,    12. 10    |           910 0f 2005 - food & feed hygiene regulations~S.I. 220 of
71   IV,    12. 10    |            Day for AIDS)~ ~Personal hygiene~Low~ ~ ~Safety awareness~
72   IV,    12. 10    |             in 2000) concerning the hygiene of foods in compliance with
73   IV,    12. 10    |        standards of food safety and hygiene reasonably available and
74   IV,    12. 10    |            prevention part~Personal hygiene~low~ ~Campaign for oral
75   IV,    12. 10    |             low~ ~Campaign for oral hygiene in particular for children :
76   IV,    12. 10    |            Health Strategy~Personal hygiene~Intermediate for public
77   IV,    12. 10    |             Intermediate for public hygiene, low for personal hygiene~
78   IV,    12. 10    |           hygiene, low for personal hygiene~Different regulations on
79   IV,    12. 10    |      regulations on requirements of hygiene of public institutions,
80   IV,    12. 10    |            technologies.~ ~Personal hygiene~ High~ National level~ ~
81   IV,    12. 10    |      campaign and services~Personal hygiene~Intermediate~Law 221 2006/
82   IV,    12. 10    |       Global Fond - GFATM)~Personal hygiene~ Intermediate~ At national