Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.  4    |          across the EU15 since the mid 1990s, though no overall reduction
 2    I,     2.  4    |                This continued into the 1990s, and has led to considerable
 3    I,     2.  4    |               countries, the 1980s and 1990s were decades with substantial
 4    I,     2.  5    |           occupations in the 1980s and 1990s. Given the skill-biased
 5    I,     3.  1    |                the late 1980s or early 1990s. In the 1960s the mean age
 6    I,     3.  2    |            stagnation in the 1960s and 1990s, Belgium and Ireland in
 7   II,     4.  2    |             1980s and 3.0 years in the 1990s. For women, the rate of
 8   II,     4.  2    |           increase was observed in the 1990s (2.7 years).~ ~Table 4.2.
 9   II,     4.  2    |                life expectancy. In the 1990s, the contribution of the
10   II,     4.  2    |             European countries. In the 1990s, mortality at the youngest
11   II,     4.  2    |              deviating pattern. In the 1990s, mortality of women aged
12   II,     4.  2    |             increased in the 1980s and 1990s.~ ~Pattern of life expectancy
13   II,     4.  2    |              disease was large. In the 1990s, the decrease in mortality
14   II,     4.  2    |               men. In addition, in the 1990s for men the decline in mortality
15   II,     4.  2    |              by cancer declined in the 1990s. For women the decrease
16   II,     4.  2    |              in life expectancy in the 1990s. In addition, there was
17   II,     4.  2    |          several countries, but in the 1990s the decline in mortality
18   II,     4.  2    |            expectancy in the 1980s and 1990s. In the 1990s they had a
19   II,     4.  2    |                1980s and 1990s. In the 1990s they had a negative impact
20   II,     4.  2    |               during the 1980s. In the 1990s mortality by traffic accidents
21   II,     4.  2    |         related cancers reduced in the 1990s, even though the effect
22   II,     4.  2    |              for men. For women in the 1990s, smoking related cancers
23   II,     4.  2    |             the negative impact in the 1990s was larger than in the 1980s.~ ~
24   II,     4.  2    |        expectancy at 65 for men in the 1990s was higher than in the 1980s
25   II,     4.  2    |            negative development in the 1990s. For those countries for
26   II,     4.  2    |      expectancy for the elderly in the 1990s was smaller than for men,
27   II,     4.  2    |            oldest old (80+). Since the 1990s the development in Eastern
28   II,     5.  2.  2|              From the mid 1980s to mid 1990s, the WHO MONICA Project
29   II,     5.  2.  2|          collected at the beginning of 1990s using standardized procedures
30   II,     5.  2.  3|          continued to fall through the 1990s, although it changed more
31   II,     5.  2.  3|           European countries up to the 1990s. Since then, cardiovascular
32   II,     5.  2.  3|                trend.~In contrast, the 1990s have seen a dramatically
33   II,     5.  2.  4|        collected between mid 1980s and 1990s through standardized methods (
34   II,     5.  2.  5|            between the early 1980s and 1990s, showed that in the populations
35   II,     5.  3.  2|                extended throughout the 1990s and into the current decade.
36   II,     5.  5.  1|             national data is from late 1990s and beginning of the 2000s.
37   II,     5.  5.  3|        incidence rates from 24 in the 1990s. Prevalence data are in
38   II,     5.  9. FB|              was observed in the early 1990s among populations living
39   II,     5.  9.  2|                end of 2005.~ ~In early 1990s two large studies were set
40   II,     5.  9.  3|               to 4.5% since the end of 1990s, based on the national database
41   II,     5.  9.  3|                18.3% by the end of the 1990s.~ ~Trends in prevalence
42   II,     5. 11.  3|          Widström, 1985), while in the 1990s it was reported to be roughly
43   II,     5. 11.  3| categorizations.~In Europe, during the 1990s, incidence rates were higher
44   II,     5. 12.  3|             and Romania) up to the mid 1990s. Subsequent declines have,
45   II,     6.  3.  3|              rise abruptly in the late 1990s, peaked in 2001 or 2002,
46   II,     6.  3.  3|             was very high in the early 1990s (over 60 cases per 100 000
47   II,     6.  3.  3|               incidence since the late 1990s. Of the 6 977 cases reported
48   II,     6.  3.  4|            rates increased in the late 1990s, but have similarly decreased
49   II,     6.  3.  5|              are diphtheria during the 1990s in the Russian Federation
50   II,     9.  1.  2|             EUROCAT, 1991). During the 1990s, a shallow further decline
51   II,     9.  2.  3|           around 20% by the end of the 1990s, while in some areas in
52   II,     9.  3.  1|              AIDS virus. Since the mid 1990s, an increase in the cases
53   II,     9.  3.  2|          relatively high ratios in the 1990s, but their ratios have declined,
54   II,     9.  3.  2|            year 2000 than in the early 1990s. Improved quality of maternal
55   II,     9.  3.  3|            years from the 1950s to the 1990s (Bajos et al, 2003). At
56   II,     9.  3.  3|              and four for women in the 1990s (Bajos et al, 2003). As
57   II,     9.  3.  3|               the last year was in the 1990s close to 25% in France and
58   II,     9.  4.  2|          reports appear to reflect the 1990s focus on healthy ageing.
59  III,    10.  2.  1|           among non-smokers during the 1990s. This decline probably reflects
60  III,    10.  4.  2|       Following the food crises of the 1990s, new measures were taken
61  III,    10.  4.  2|           measures; estimate for~early 1990s: effect in~several thousand
62  III,    10.  4.  2|               fish).~ ~During the late 1990s, the European consumer was
63  III,    10.  4.  3|               drinking-water since the 1990s. A majority is connected
64  III,    10.  4.  5|         quality has improved since the 1990s. In 2003, as much as 97%
65  III,    10.  4.  5|             Since the beginning of the 1990s, a number of EU directives
66  III,    10.  5.  3|           occupations in the 1980s and 1990s. Given the skill-biased
67  III,    10.  6.  2|                This continued into the 1990s and led to considerable
68  III,    10.  6.  2|               confirmed by data of the 1990s coming from eight European
69   IV,    11.  1.  1|                 particularly since the 1990s, advances in health care
70   IV,    11.  1.  3|              currency in the 1980s and 1990s, spreading from initial ‘
71   IV,    11.  1.  3|            2002). Health reform in the 1990s thus focused more on introducing
72   IV,    11.  3.  1|         countries during the 1980s and 1990s, which reduced the number
73   IV,    11.  3.  2|     containment efforts throughout the 1990s. Over the same period, however,
74   IV,    11.  6.  1|               in many countries in the 1990s, this may not reflect success
75   IV,    11.  6.  1|         economic growth of 8.8% in the 1990s explains the apparent decline
76   IV,    11.  6.  1|       expenditure growth slowed in the 1990s as severe economic recession
77   IV,    11.  6.  2|              and Eastern Europe in the 1990s where there was a shift
78   IV,    11.  6.  2|             not available prior to the 1990s, and also in Finland, France,
79   IV,    11.  6.  2|              Saltman 2004). During the 1990s all of the newer Member
80   IV,    11.  6.  2|               reforms in France in the 1990s (see above). Furthermore,
81   IV,    11.  6.  2|          out-of-pocket payments in the 1990s (Preker et al, 2002). Data
82   IV,    11.  6.  2|            appears that throughout the 1990s there was an increasing
83   IV,    11.  6.  3|           progressiveness in the early 1990s (Klavus and Hakkinen, 1998).
84   IV,    11.  6.  3|       Comparing eight countries in the 1990s, the funding system in Sweden
85   IV,    11.  6.  4|                even increased over the 1990s (Thomson et al, 2004).~ ~
86   IV,    12.  5    |               period, beginning in the 1990s, up to the year for which