Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  5.  3|            may cause diseases such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, orthopaedic
 2   II,     5.  5.  3|             infections and hepatitis, osteoporosis, altered pain sensitivity,
 3   II,     5.  6.  1|               2) bone conditions e.g. osteoporosis and associated fragility
 4   II,     5.  6.  1| osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and back pain.~ ~Musculoskeletal
 5   II,     5.  6.  1|              older age, in particular osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. Changes
 6   II,     5.  6.  2|               AD, Pfleger B Burden of Osteoporosis and Fractures in Developing
 7   II,     5.  6.  2|         Developing Countries, Current Osteoporosis Reports 2005; 3: 84-91 (
 8   II,     5.  6.  3|           studies have shown that for osteoporosis and arthritis the healthcare
 9   II,     5.  6.  3|           through specific studies.~ ~Osteoporosis and low trauma fractures~ ~
10   II,     5.  6.  3|              fractures~ ~Definition~ ~Osteoporosis is defined as a systemic
11   II,     5.  6.  3|               diagnostic criteria for osteoporosis on the basis of measurement
12   II,     5.  6.  3|           this concept by considering osteoporosis to be present when the BMD
13   II,     5.  6.  3|            women.~ ~The International Osteoporosis Foundation has recommended
14   II,     5.  6.  3|               the following values:~ ~Osteoporosis: a BMD value at least 2.
15   II,     5.  6.  3|              score1).~ ~Clinically, osteoporosis is recognized by the occurrence
16   II,     5.  6.  3|         history~ ~A classical case of osteoporosis may be present in a woman
17   II,     5.  6.  3|               instantly recognizable, osteoporosis may present any of a wide
18   II,     5.  6.  3|          Incidence~ ~The incidence of osteoporosis is best measured indirectly
19   II,     5.  6.  3|             over 50 are the result of osteoporosis. The incidence rates of
20   II,     5.  6.  3|              the European Prospective Osteoporosis Study (European Prospective
21   II,     5.  6.  3|           Study (European Prospective Osteoporosis Study, 2002). Similar figures
22   II,     5.  6.  3|               the United Kingdom have osteoporosis at any site as defined by
23   II,     5.  6.  3|               the proportion that has osteoporosis between 50 and 80 years
24   II,     5.  6.  3|             the general prevalence of osteoporosis rises from 5% in women at
25   II,     5.  6.  3|          falling, low bone mass, i.e. osteoporosis, and previous low trauma
26   II,     5.  6.  3|                and those who may have osteoporosis or be at risk of fracture (
27   II,     5.  6.  3|             bone loss, development of osteoporosis and for fracture in the
28   II,     5.  6.  3|           also occur in women without osteoporosis. The possibility of fracture
29   II,     5.  6.  3|        limitations. Chronic vertebral osteoporosis, with progressive compression
30   II,     5.  6.  3|               risk factors (Report on osteoporosis in the European Community
31   II,     5.  6.  4|              rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis and due to the ageing of
32   II,     5.  6.  4|          particular those affected by osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. Changes
33   II,     5.  6.  6|                1992): Epidemiology of osteoporosis. Trends Endocrinol Metab
34   II,     5.  6.  6|          Commission (1998): Report on Osteoporosis in the European Community:
35   II,     5.  6.  6|                  European Prospective Osteoporosis Study Group (2002): Incidence
36   II,     5.  6.  6|              the European prospective osteoporosis study (EPOS). J Bone Miner
37   II,     5.  6.  6|           criteria for osteopenia and osteoporosis. Bone 27:585-590~Kanis JA
38   II,     5.  6.  6|             DXA for the Management of Osteoporosis in Europe. Osteoporos Int
39   II,     5.  6.  6|         Epidemiology of fractures. In Osteoporosis: Etiology, Diagnosis, and
40   II,     5.  6.  6|          screening for postmenopausal osteoporosis: report of a World Health
41   II,     5.  6.  6|           Pfleger B (2005): Burden of osteoporosis and fractures in developing
42   II,     5.  6.  6|               2006): The Patient with Osteoporosis. In: Osteoporosis and the
43   II,     5.  6.  6|        Patient with Osteoporosis. In: Osteoporosis and the osteoporosis of
44   II,     5.  6.  6|              In: Osteoporosis and the osteoporosis of the rheumatic disease.
45   II,     5.  8.  3|              namely: asthma, allergy, osteoporosis, hypertension, digestive
46   II,     5.  8.  3|            cataracts, bone fractures, osteoporosis, pneumonia, and respiratory
47   II,     5.  8.  3|           relative risk (RR) = 16.0), osteoporosis (RR = 3.1), RI (RR = 2.2),
48   II,     5.  8.  3|            found that 68% of them had osteoporosis or osteopenia (Jorgensen
49   II,     5.  8.  3|               increased prevalence of osteoporosis could not be explained by
50   II,     5.  8.  7|              2007): The prevalence of osteoporosis in patients with chronic
51   II,     5. 13    |               such as neural defects, osteoporosis, goiter, anaemia and hypovitaminoses.
52   II,     5. 14.  4|      cardiovascular diseases, cancer, osteoporosis and oral diseases. Oral
53   II,     9.  3.  1|            risk for illnesses such as osteoporosis and coronary heart disease (
54   II,     9.  3.  1|              rather critical issue.~ ~Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a major
55   II,     9.  3.  1|       critical issue.~ ~Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a major public health
56   II,     9.  3.  1|             considered to suffer from osteoporosis. There are substantial differences
57   II,     9.  3.  1|              fracture: (a) those with osteoporosis who have not yet had a fracture
58   II,     9.  3.  1|              and (b) those women with osteoporosis who have already had a fracture
59   II,     9.  3.  1|           European regions. Moreover, osteoporosis affects a large proportion
60   II,     9.  3.  1|               double by 2025.Rates of osteoporosis and related bone fractures
61   II,     9.  3.  1|             or substantially delayed. Osteoporosis may have no obvious symptoms.
62   II,     9.  3.  1|            main method for diagnosing osteoporosis is the evaluation of the
63   II,     9.  3.  1|         treatment or intervention for osteoporosis, although bone density is
64   II,     9.  3.  1|             is a limited diagnosis of osteoporosis in Europe. Despite the availability
65   II,     9.  3.  1|            not routinely assessed for osteoporosis and may not receive treatment
66   II,     9.  3.  1|           more women than men develop osteoporosis, men appear to be at a much
67   II,     9.  3.  1|              and secondary sources of osteoporosis contributing to the problem.
68   II,     9.  3.  1|              of falls. The problem of osteoporosis is not only an age related
69   II,     9.  3.  1|            2005). The significance of osteoporosis in men is that, as it tends
70   II,     9.  3.  1|            preventive efforts against osteoporosis throughout life. Avoidance
71   II,     9.  3.  1|         menopausal women and men with osteoporosis. Now there are new bone-specific
72   II,     9.  3.  1|      broad-spectrum drugs that combat osteoporosis and have potentially beneficial
73   II,     9.  3.  1|               estrogen deficiency and osteoporosis. As a consequence, women’
74   II,     9.  3.  1|           pharmacologic therapies for osteoporosis may yield positive oral
75   II,     9.  3.  1|                Fitzpatrick RD (2004): Osteoporosis in Men. In Kirby, R.S Carson,
76   II,     9.  3.  1|             DK (2008). "Screening for Osteoporosis in Men: A Clinical Practice
77   II,     9.  4.  3|            more likely to suffer from osteoporosis, diabetes, hypertension,
78  III,    10.  2.  1|         menopause~- Crohn’s disease~- Osteoporosis~- Impotence~- Premature
79  III,    10.  2.  1|               such as neural defects, osteoporosis, goiter , anaemia and hypovitaminoses,
80  III,    10.  2.  1|               increasing the risk for osteoporosis and hence bone fractures
81  III,    10.  2.  1|            can lay the foundation for osteoporosis and this is of concern considering
82  III,    10.  2.  1|            greater risk of fractures. Osteoporosis affects one in three women
83  III,    10.  2.  1|              main agents for fighting osteoporosis include:~ ~ ~o Calcium.
84  III,    10.  2.  1|  cardiovascular disease, diabetes and osteoporosis. There are several ways
85  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|      oropharinx~orphan~osteoarthritis~osteoporosis~outbreak~outbreaks~outcome~