Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     3.  2    |       growth (i.e. the number of births minus deaths) was the major
 2    I,     3.  2    | population growth (the number of births minus deaths) was the major
 3    I,     3.  2    |     higher number of deaths than births) and several States have
 4    I,     3.  3    |      grow (significant excess of births over deaths), while older
 5    I,     3.  3    |  increase (excess of deaths over births). The absolute number of
 6    I,     3.  3    |           The absolute number of births and deaths in a population
 7    I,     3.  3    |          the absolute numbers of births and deaths have effects
 8   II,     9        |         preterm labor, caesarean births and neonatal intensive care
 9   II,     9.  1    |         5 to 15 per 100 000 live births – but are associated with
10   II,     9.  1.  1|          expressed per 1000 live births in the same year. This rate
11   II,     9.  1.  1|        grams for registration of births, which can create a bias
12   II,     9.  1.  1|          expressed per 1000 live births in the same year.~Same as
13   II,     9.  1.  1|       mortality~ ~Table 9.1.1.2. Births, deaths and rates of foetal,
14   II,     9.  1.  1|         and medical registers of births and deaths, are published
15   II,     9.  1.  1|      services~C: Distribution of births by mode of delivery by parity,
16   II,     9.  1.  1|         visit~R: Distribution of births by mode of onset of labour~
17   II,     9.  1.  1|         maternal satisfaction~F: Births attended by midwives~F:
18   II,     9.  1.  1|          attended by midwives~F: Births without medical intervention~ ~
19   II,     9.  1.  1|          to 22.1 per 1 000 total births in the current EU Member
20   II,     9.  1.  1|        from 1.6 to 9.5 per 1 000 births. Neonatal mortality rates
21   II,     9.  1.  1|      rates are about 2 per 1 000 births in Sweden, Luxembourg, Czech Republic,
22   II,     9.  1.  1|        in 2004 was 2.7 per 1 000 births. This median rate was much
23   II,     9.  1.  1|         mortality (3.9 per 1 000 births) between the original members
24   II,     9.  1.  1|          higher at 6.9 per 1 000 births.~ ~F ~ ~Infant mortality
25   II,     9.  1.  1|     Between 4 and 9% of all live births have a birth weight less
26   II,     9.  1.  1|          1.3. Percentage of live births with a birth weight less
27   II,     9.  1.  1|     mildly or moderately preterm births, have higher mortality and
28   II,     9.  1.  1|          5 to 2.5 per 1 000 live births. Cerebral Palsy is a group
29   II,     9.  1.  1| countries, is 2.0 per 1 000 live births. As shown in Table 9.1.1.
30   II,     9.  1.  1|       palsy rates per 1 000 live births in selected EUGLOREH countries,
31   II,     9.  1.  1|      1500g. VLBW rate among live births is not rare; it has increased
32   II,     9.  1.  1|       average, 94 per 1 000 live births during the period 1990-1998.
33   II,     9.  1.  1|   country from 26 per 1 000 live births (Lithuania) up to 164 per
34   II,     9.  1.  1|         up to 164 per 1 000 live births (Ireland). This variation
35   II,     9.  1.  1|           Better data on preterm births and neonatal morbidities
36   II,     9.  1.  1|          of survival for preterm births by weight and gestational
37   II,     9.  1.  1|      rates in 860 singleton live births at 24 and 25 weeks gestational
38   II,     9.  1.  1|  mortality in twin and singleton births in the North of England,
39   II,     9.  1.  1|          2004): Role of multiple births in very low birth weight
40   II,     9.  1.  2|    covering in total 1.4 million births per year. Annual birth coverage
41   II,     9.  1.  2|       birth coverage is 23.4% of births of the EU-15 countries,
42   II,     9.  1.  2|       The proportion of national births covered by registers in
43   II,     9.  1.  2|      anomalies of 23.8 per 1 000 births for 2000-2004 (Table 9.1.
44   II,     9.  1.  2|     prevalence is 19.9 per 1 000 births.~ ~Table 9.1.2.1. Prevalence
45   II,     9.  1.  2|          1. Prevalence per 1 000 births of EUROCAT congenital anomaly
46   II,     9.  1.  2|       anomalies is 3.4 per 1 000 births. In the data shown in Table
47   II,     9.  1.  2|       subgroup, at 6.4 per 1 000 births, followed by limb defects (
48   II,     9.  1.  2|   prevalence above 0.1 per 1 000 births are shown in Table 9.1.2.
49   II,     9.  1.  2|       birth prevalence per 1 000 births of All Anomalies and Cardiac
50   II,     9.  1.  2|        anomaly is 0.43 per 1 000 births, and deaths in the first
51   II,     9.  1.  2|        first week 0.55 per 1 000 births, giving a total perinatal
52   II,     9.  1.  2|        anomaly of 0.99 per 1 000 births (Table 9.1.2.2). The main
53   II,     9.  1.  2|         diagnosis (TOPFA) to all births, and Perinatal Mortality
54   II,     9.  1.  2|    Perinatal Mortality per 1 000 births, by country, 2000-2004~ ~
55   II,     9.  1.  2|            The ratio of TOPFA to births varies from 0 (Ireland and
56   II,     9.  1.  2|          11.4 (France) per 1 000 births. Differing prenatal screening
57   II,     9.  1.  2|    France (5.6 and 5.8 per 1 000 births respectively). Comparison
58   II,     9.  1.  2|         disease is 6.1 per 1 000 births (Table 9.1.2.1), the largest
59   II,     9.  1.  2|         Europe, to 2.2 per 1 000 births. Geographical variation
60   II,     9.  1.  2|          where the proportion of births to mothers over 35 is high,
61   II,     9.  1.  2|       birth prevalence per 1 000 births of Down Syndrome, 1992-2004~ ~
62   II,     9.  1.  2|          1.2.2) to 1.0 per 1 000 births as the increase in TOPFA
63   II,     9.  1.  2|       birth prevalence per 1 000 births of Neural Tube Defects and
64   II,     9.  1.  2|       birth prevalence per 1 000 births of Neural Tube Defects,
65   II,     9.  1.  2|       lip occur in 1.3 per 1 000 births in Europe (Table 9.1.2.1).
66   II,     9.  1.  2|      prevalence of 0.2 per 1 000 births in 2000-2004 (Table 9.1.
67   II,     9.  1.  2|         minimum of 1.3 per 1 000 births (Table 9.1.2.1). Individual
68   II,     9.  1.  2|         preterm labor, caesarean births and neonatal intensive care
69   II,     9.  3.  2|     sufficiently large number of births, certainly no fewer than
70   II,     9.  3.  2|       following: record linkage (births, deaths, induced abortions,
71   II,     9.  3.  2|          deaths per 100 000 live births in the early 1980s to 7
72   II,     9.  3.  2|       number of events and total births, whilst observed differences
73   II,     9.  3.  2|        of pre-term and post-term births (Blondel et al, 2006; Zeitlin
74   II,     9.  3.  2|          about 150 per 1000 live births to 300 per 1000 live births.
75   II,     9.  3.  2|      births to 300 per 1000 live births. This practice has been
76   II,     9.  3.  2|     treatments increase multiple births – which have higher mortality
77   II,     9.  3.  2|          of survival for preterm births by weight and gestational
78   II,     9.  3.  2|      rates in 860 singleton live births at 24 and 25 weeks gestational
79   II,     9.  3.  2|  mortality in twin and singleton births in the North of England,
80   II,     9.  3.  2|          2004): Role of multiple births in very low birth weight
81   II,     9.  3.  3|      conceptions, abortions, and births in England, 1994-2003, and
82  III,    10.  2.  1|        large for gestational age births. Obstetrics and Gynecology
83   IV,    12. 10    |      Unprotected sex~ ~Number of births and abortions/ 1,000 women
84  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|       bipolar~birth~birth weight~births~bladder~bleeding~blind~blindness~