Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.  5    |    flexibility and mobility). In response to globalisation and economic
 2   II,     5.  1.  1|         delayed type of allergic response to certain potentially sensitizing
 3   II,     5.  5.  3|    burden of disease approach: a response to Williams. Health Economics
 4   II,     5.  8.  1|         an abnormal inflammatory response of the lung to noxious particles
 5   II,     5.  9. FB|        produce IgE antibodies in response to ordinary exposure to
 6   II,     5.  9. FB|      produce an excess of IgE in response to the exposure to substances
 7   II,     5.  9. FB|        usually do not elicit any response in non allergic individuals.~
 8   II,     5.  9.  4|          PM based on the overall response pattern in the bioassays,
 9   II,     5.  9.  7|       air: contrasts in the dose response to cat and dust-mite. Indoor
10   II,     5. 11.  3|         delayed type of allergic response to certain potentially sensitizing
11   II,     5. 11.  3|      ions might have an allergic response within a matter of hours
12   II,     5. 11.  3|        be sufficient to elicit a response. On this basis, the European
13   II,     5. 11.  3|      does not induce an allergic response and does not penetrate the
14   II,     5. 11.  5|       for a public health policy response to reduce the burden of
15   II,     5. 14.  1|         creation of new roles in response to changing patterns of
16   II,     6.Acr    |   Control~EWRS~Early Warning and Response System~HBV~Hepatitis B Virus~
17   II,     6.  4.  2|          is an early warning and response system (EWRS) to alert public
18   II,     6.  4.  2|     ensure a rapid and effective response by the EU to events (including
19   II,     6.  4.  2|       place an early warning and response system (EWRS). EWRS is a
20   II,     6.  4.  3| particular:~ ~· preparedness and response plans by the EU countries;~·
21   II,     6.  4.  4|         of the Early Warning and Response System in order to link
22   II,     7.  5    |        forward the public health response, the European Commission
23   II,     7.  6    | improvement in the public health response to interpersonal violence
24   II,     9        |    problems, slowed neurological response, decreased muscle strength
25   II,     9.  1.  2|         countries, give a common response to European public health
26   II,     9.  1.  2|     create an appropriate policy response.~ ~g) Much greater investment
27   II,     9.  2.  5|      combating of HIV/AIDS.~ ~In response to the growing problem of
28   II,     9.  3.  1|        cardiovascular disease;~· response to toxins;~· brain organisation;
29   II,     9.  3.  3|      Sexual behaviour changes in response to both secular and non-secular
30   II,     9.  4.  2|        European countries, was a response to demands by policy makers
31   II,     9.  4.  4|    problems, slowed neurological response, decreased muscle strength
32   II,     9.  5.  3|     anti-depressants, and in the response to treatments and their
33   II,     9.  5.  4|          as reasons for the slow response of medical science to evidence
34  III,    10.  1    |      changes in our behaviour in response to those factors. Of the
35  III,    10.  1.  1|        fact that the food intake response to exercise is influenced
36  III,    10.  1.  3|         involved in the appetite response to moderate increases in
37  III,    10.  2.  1|     wording of the question, the response categories and the related
38  III,    10.  2.  1|    another important part of the response to the drug problem in Europe.
39  III,    10.  2.  1|        developed into a priority response to prevent infectious diseases
40  III,    10.  2.  1|     introduced this measure as a response to health-risks related
41  III,    10.  2.  1|         of the questions and the response format often varies. Different
42  III,    10.  2.  1|        part of the public health response to current concerns regarding
43  III,    10.  2.  1|    Region and the strategies for response. Copenhagen.[ ht ] (on-line
44  III,    10.  2.  1|         data collection methods, response rates, age ranges, years
45  III,    10.  2.  1|      exercise that promotes bone response may be different from the
46  III,    10.  2.  1|        for an effective societal response” (Commission of the European
47  III,    10.  2.  1|      Region and the strategy for response. Copenhagen, World Health
48  III,    10.  2.  1|      Region and the strategy for response. Summary. Copenhagen, World
49  III,    10.  2.  4|         diseases as well as with response to therapies;~· the differentiation
50  III,    10.  3.  4|         4.2. Data sources~ ~ ~In response to the need for better data
51  III,    10.  3.  4|     special attention during the response and recovery periods . Hospitals,
52  III,    10.  3.  4|   stakeholders. An international response was also launched to deliver
53  III,    10.  3.  4|        the limited public-health response was due to a lack of experts,
54  III,    10.  3.  4|        public organisations . In response to this, in 2004, the French
55  III,    10.  3.  4|    systems and the institutional response capacity and recovery planning.
56  III,    10.  3.  4|        action and cooperation in response, due to expected increased
57  III,    10.  4.  2|     characterised the 90s and in response to the damaging consequences
58  III,    10.  4.  2|        Its work is undertaken in response to specific requests for
59  III,    10.  4.  2|       and survival studies, dose response studies, and lifestyle studies.~ ~
60  III,    10.  4.  2|           situation worldwide in response to the many requests for
61  III,    10.  4.  2|        consideration of additive response including criteria to be
62  III,    10.  4.  2|     describes and evaluates doseresponse relationships for the most
63  III,    10.  4.  5|    stress for lack of regulatory response etc) are considered. These
64  III,    10.  5.  3|    flexibility and mobility). In response to globalisation and economic
65  III,    10.  6.  1|    Northern Ireland (about 300). Response rates varied from 23% (Great
66  III,    10.  6.  1|        the countries/regions the response rate was less than 50%.~ ~
67  III,    10.  6.  1|    reflecting the highly varying response rates between countries.
68   IV,    11.  1.  3|        capita (1990-2004)~ ~As a response, there was a gradual shift
69   IV,    11.  1.  5|        saving eight lives. Quick response and the recognition of early
70   IV,    11.  1.  5|          which initiated a rapid response system to early signs of
71   IV,    11.  2.  1|        introduced in Europe as a response to the rising prevalence
72   IV,    11.  6.  2|         system were withdrawn in response to considerable resistance.
73   IV,    11.  6.  5|         1992): "Reweighing heat: Response." Journal of Health Economics
74   IV,    12.  1    |         life in 1950 as a direct response to shortage in coal and
75   IV,    12.  4    |      crisis situations and~rapid response to life-threatening epidemics
76   IV,    12.  4    |       the Commission set out its response to the report of the reflection
77   IV,    12.  5    |          improvement of existing response capacity and assets, including
78   IV,    12. 10    |       and monitor~a co-ordinated response to illicit drug use~at local/
79   IV,    12. 10    |        deliver a~community based response to addiction via~the emerging
80   IV,    13.  4    |  investments in human capital in response to new competence requirements.
81   IV,    13.  5    |       the Commission set out its response to the report of the reflection
82   IV,    13.  6.  2|          the early detection and response to neglect or abuse more
83   IV,    13.  7.  1|      this challenge, a political response at EU level bringing together