Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  1.  1|             environmental exposure; indoor and outdoor air pollution (
 2   II,     5.  9. FB|             conditions, exposure to indoor and outdoor pollutants and,
 3   II,     5.  9.  4|          environmental exposure;~3. indoor and outdoor pollution;~4.
 4   II,     5.  9.  4|           Alberg T 2009)~ ~Also the indoor environment seems to play
 5   II,     5.  9.  4|       heater fumes. Contributors to indoor air pollution include ambient
 6   II,     5.  9.  5|           environmental exposure;~· indoor and outdoor pollution; and~·
 7   II,     5.  9.  7|  Platts-Mills TA (2005): Asthma and indoor air: contrasts in the dose
 8   II,     5.  9.  7|      response to cat and dust-mite. Indoor Air. 2005;15 Suppl 10:33-
 9   II,     5.  9.  7|      Bischof W, Wichmann HE (2001): Indoor Factors and Genetics in
10   II,     9        |         exposed to higher levels of indoor air pollution and to the
11   II,     9.  2.  5|            ensure clean outdoor and indoor airRPG IV: aim at chemical-free
12   II,     9.  4.  4|         exposed to higher levels of indoor air pollution and to the
13  III,    10.  1    |       substances in the outdoor and indoor environment, including the
14  III,    10.  2.  1|    workplaces, public transport and indoor public places;~· regulation
15  III,    10.  3.  1|           failed to confirm this.~ ~Indoor radon exposure caused by
16  III,    10.  3.  1|          which will likely increase indoor radon exposure. Almost all
17  III,    10.  3.  1|    protection of the public against indoor radon exposure (90/143/Euratom).
18  III,    10.  3.  1|      information of the public, the indoor radon reference level (annual
19  III,    10.  3.  1|      However, the gaps and needs in indoor radon policymaking vary
20  III,    10.  3.  4|          and location of buildings, indoor temperature, exposure to
21  III,    10.  4.  1|         agriculture sectors.~ ~Poor indoor air quality is the source
22  III,    10.  4.  1|          symptoms in children. Many indoor problems are related to
23  III,    10.  4.  1|             office buildings. Other indoor air quality problems arise
24  III,    10.  4.  1|          the quality of outdoor and indoor air.~ ~Air pollution is
25  III,    10.  4.  1|          are exposed to outdoor and indoor air pollutants in their
26  III,    10.  4.  1|          travel. The quality of the indoor environment is particularly
27  III,    10.  4.  1|           about the contribution of indoor air quality to respiratory
28  III,    10.  4.  1|          and whether factors in the indoor environment contribute to
29  III,    10.  4.  1|      increase in asthma prevalence. Indoor air quality is therefore,
30  III,    10.  4.  1|           and adults spend indoors. Indoor air pollutants can be classified
31  III,    10.  4.  1|          there are several specific indoor sources of air pollution,
32  III,    10.  4.  1|  construction materials, paints and indoor furnishings (furniture,
33  III,    10.  4.  1|      furniture, carpets, etc). Some indoor sources are linked to human
34  III,    10.  4.  1|             leads to an increase in indoor humidity, which stimulates
35  III,    10.  4.  1|       problems are connected to the indoor environment, including allergic
36  III,    10.  4.  1|          the combined burden of the indoor environment. Although the
37  III,    10.  4.  1|      Although the importance of the indoor environment is generally
38  III,    10.  4.  1|            far less knowledge about indoor than outdoor air quality.
39  III,    10.  4.  1|             European guidelines for indoor air quality. In the US,
40  III,    10.  4.  1|        where also the importance of indoor air has increasingly been
41  III,    10.  5.  1| construction material and unhealthy indoor air quality, also influenced
42  III,    10.  5.  1|             of pollution within the indoor environment, in some cases
43  III,    10.  5.  1|          example, open fireplaces). Indoor physical pollution, associated
44  III,    10.  5.  1|           factors such as crowding, indoor pests and moulds, unsafe
45  III,    10.  5.  1|          these compounds affect the indoor air, from which they are
46  III,    10.  5.  1|           consequences.~Second, the indoor temperatures by themselves
47  III,    10.  5.  1|             al, 2007). Such extreme indoor temperatures can occur during
48  III,    10.  5.  1|          poor insulation. Moreover, indoor temperatures can affect
49  III,    10.  5.  1|          little data on the average indoor temperatures in European
50  III,    10.  5.  1|              Wright et al, 2005).~ ~Indoor pests and moulds~ ~Mould
51  III,    10.  5.  1|            increase the exposure to indoor pollutants and risk factors.
52  III,    10.  5.  1|         plays a role in controlling indoor conditions. Inadequate ventilation
53  III,    10.  5.  1|         pollution as it accumulates indoor emissions (Eme s, 1998).~ ~
54  III,    10.  5.  1|    determinants that can affect the indoor conditions are traffic-related (
55  III,    10.  5.  1|            in homes without special indoor sources (such as smoking,
56  III,    10.  5.  1|             etc.), around 60-70% of indoor particulates may be due
57  III,    10.  5.  1|          Conclusion~ ~In brief, the indoor dimension of human settlements
58  III,    10.  5.  1|   individuals. The relevance of the indoor quality and conditions of
59  III,    10.  5.  1|   environment is the most important indoor environment, besides home.~ ~
60  III,    10.  5.  1|           al, 2008a).~ ~Besides the indoor sources of air pollution,
61  III,    10.  5.  1|           clear need to improve the indoor environment in schools.
62  III,    10.  5.  1|               Building dampness and indoor mould growth should be avoided,
63  III,    10.  5.  1|       Angell WJ and Apte MG (2003): Indoor air quality, ventilation
64  III,    10.  5.  1|            of existing information. Indoor Air, 13:53-64.~ DEFRA (2004):
65  III,    10.  5.  1|           Mehta S, Smith KR (2004): Indoor smoke from solid fuels -
66  III,    10.  5.  1|         domestic mite allergens and indoor pollutants in a cold climatic
67  III,    10.  5.  1|            systems in buildings In: Indoor Air 2005; 15:246-256~Hulsmann
68  III,    10.  5.  1|         formaldehyde in classrooms. Indoor Air.~Mendell MJ, Heath GA (
69  III,    10.  5.  1|             MJ, Heath GA (2005): Do indoor pollutants and thermal conditions
70  III,    10.  5.  1|           review of the literature. Indoor Air. 2005, 15:27-52. Review.
71  III,    10.  5.  1|             52. Review. Erratum in: Indoor Air. (2005) 15:67.~Miller
72  III,    10.  5.  1|          Jones R (2005): How is the indoor environment related to asthma?:
73  III,    10.  5.  1|                  Tranter DC (2005): Indoor allergens in settled school
74  III,    10.  5.  1|   Development of WHO Guidelines for Indoor Air QualityReport on
75   IV,    12.  2    |    workplaces, public transport and indoor public places;~regulation
76   IV,    12. 10    |    Environments Act permits smoking indoor at small hospitality establishments (
77   IV,    12. 10    |     Policies to improve outdoor and indoor air quality have a long
78   IV,    12. 10    |            attempts to achieve good indoor as well as ambient air quality.
79   IV,    13.  2.  2|             to infectious diseases, indoor air pollution and malnutrition.
80   IV,    13.  2.  2|          infections attributable to indoor air pollution accounted
81   IV,    13.  2.  3|   malnutrition, poor sanitation and indoor air pollution still produce
82   IV,    13.  2.  3|             tract infections due to indoor air pollution accounted
83  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|         income~incomes~incontinence~indoor~industrial~industry~inequalities~