Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.Acr    |          Programme~GDP~Gross Domestic Product~HTA~Health technology assessment~
 2    I,     2.  2    |              to meet evolving demand. Product quality and innovation are
 3    I,     2.  4    |             per capita Gross Domestic Product. The data reported in Figure
 4    I,     2.  4    |             income and gross domestic product per capita and, particularly,
 5    I,     2.  4    |            Figure 2.2. Gross Domestic Product and Gross National Income
 6    I,     2.  4    |           rate of real gross domestic product in EUGLOREH countries.~ ~
 7    I,     2. 10.  4|       point-of-care scanning to match product data to patient data, verification
 8    I,     2. 10.  4|         assign a unique identity to a product at the point of manufacture,
 9    I,     2. 10.  4|             verify and authenticate a product at any point of the supply
10    I,     2. 10.  4|          supplies (inventory control, product recall, etc.). For example,
11    I,     2. 10.  4|         management (simplification of product identity control and quantity
12    I,     2. 10.  4|    prescription process and automatic product identification in the San
13    I,     2. 10.  4|            reimbursement and to check product registration. These diverging
14    I,     2. 10.  4|         system for traceability, from product manufacture to patient treatment,
15    I,     2. 10.  4|     increasing legal requirements for product traceability around the
16    I,     2. 10.  4|              be used to identify that product in any country without any
17   II,     5.  3.Acr|              Today~GDP~Gross Domestic Product~HPV~Human Papilloma Virus~
18   II,     5.  3.  1|               specific Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and their trends are
19   II,     5.  3.  3|             per capita Gross Domestic Product as published by EUROSTAT
20   II,     5.  5.  1|           almost 1% of Gross National Product of the country (Kennelly,
21   II,     5.  5.  3|        dietary factors such as animal product intake, herbal tea or tropical
22   II,     5.  6.  4|              7% of the gross national product.~ ~Future trends~ ~The impact
23   II,     5. 10.  5|            than 25% of the final food product. In addition, Annex IIIa
24   II,     5. 10.  5|             the EFSA for the relevant product from which they originated.~ ~ ~
25   II,     5. 11.  3|       reactions from a non-conforming product is significant. The significant
26   II,     5. 15.  4|        concepts of "similar medicinal product" and "clinical superiority".
27   II,     7.Acr    |               and Development~PROSAFE~Product Safety Enforcement Forum~
28   II,     7.  4.  5|           complemented by the General Product Safety Directive (European
29   II,     7.  4.  5|               accidents some kind of “product” is involved (Figure 7.23),
30   II,     7.  4.  5|               countries~ ~Analyses of product or service related injuries
31   II,     7.  4.  5|             injury, the nature of the product and/or service and the circumstances
32   II,     7.  4.  5|             be used by regulators and product developers to ensure continuous
33   II,     7.  4.  5| Standardization (ANEC) www g, and the Product Safety Enforcement Forum (
34   II,     7.  5    |           attention should be paid to product and service safety.~Set
35   II,     7.  5    |            reliable information about product and service related injury
36   II,     7.  6    |            safety, safety of elderly, product and service safety. Additional
37   II,     7.  7    |            and the Council on general product safety (CELEX-Nr. 32001L0095).~ ~
38  III,    10.  1.  1|        behavioural risk factor is the product of the complex interactions
39  III,    10.  1.  3|        advertising aimed at children, product placement, and food labelling.
40  III,    10.  2.  1|            Control~GDP~Gross Domestic Product~NCDs~Non-communicable diseases~
41  III,    10.  2.  1|              safe or harmless tobacco product. Smokeless tobacco use,
42  III,    10.  2.  1|           harmful constituents in its product, known as snus.~Health effects
43  III,    10.  2.  1|                 regulation of tobacco product disclosures;~· packaging
44  III,    10.  2.  1|             two main sides of tobacco product packages should be mandatory
45  III,    10.  2.  1|               mere description of the product without any of the messages
46  III,    10.  2.  1|          provides information about a product, its effects and the industry
47  III,    10.  2.  1|            market consists of various product groups such as dental floss,
48  III,    10.  2.  1|              Meranwhile, in France, a product specific for young adults
49  III,    10.  2.  1|        regards the composition of the product, the manufacturer, methods
50  III,    10.  2.  1|            than 25% of the final food product. The amended Directive also
51  III,    10.  2.  1|              UR, Riboli E (2002): Soy product consumption in 10 European
52  III,    10.  3.  2|        Communities~GDP~Gross Domestic Product~HCB~Hexachlorobenzene~HCH~
53  III,    10.  3.  2|            faster than gross domestic product (GDP) over the past ten
54  III,    10.  3.  2|        Responsible Care, and (Global) Product stewardship. But legislation
55  III,    10.  4.  2|            identify the source of the product in the country of origin.
56  III,    10.  4.  2|             immediate supplier of the product and the immediate subsequent
57  III,    10.  4.  2|             reported with the largest product category being nuts and
58  III,    10.  4.  2|        preventative approach, such as product and process design and the
59  III,    10.  4.  2|              level, applicable to any product marketed within the Community,
60  III,    10.  4.  2|            and feed (6). Where a food product contains or consists of
61  III,    10.  4.  4|           complemented by the General Product Safety Directive.~ ~Accidents
62  III,    10.  4.  4|               accidents some kind of “product” is involved (see Figure
63  III,    10.  4.  4|            the injury and that of the product and/or service, as well
64  III,    10.  4.  4|             be used by regulators and product developers to ensure continuous
65  III,    10.  4.  4| Standardization (ANEC) www g, and the Product Safety Enforcement Forum (
66  III,    10.  5.  1|         Alliance (2006): Child safety product guide: potentially dangerous
67  III,    10.  5.  2|       Communities~GDP~ Gross Domestic Product~GP~ General Practitioner~
68  III,    10.  5.  3|             Survey~GDP~Gross Domestic Product~HSWA~Health and Safety at
69   IV,    11.  3.  2|             reasonableprice for the product based on balancing affordability
70   IV,    11.  3.  2|              cost of a more expensive product. Evidence suggests, however,
71   IV,    11.  3.  2|            always clear. In Finland a product’s price and reimbursement
72   IV,    11.  3.  2|              least-cost multi-sourced product. However, this policy is
73   IV,    12.Acr    |     Administration~GNP~Gross National Product~ICH~International Conference
74   IV,    12.  1    |               why they will not let a product lawfully marketed in other
75   IV,    12.  2    |       products;~regulation of tobacco product disclosures;~packaging and
76   IV,    12.  2    |     advertising to description of the product without any of the messages
77   IV,    12.  2    |          provides information about a product, its effects and the industry
78   IV,    12. 10    |       measurement methods, labelling, product descriptions etc. for tobacco
79   IV,    12. 10    |          information activities and a product development effort from
80   IV,    12. 10    |            Foundation for comparative product testing (Stiftung Warentest,
81   IV,    12. 10    |       complementary procedural rules.~Product responsibility is regarded
82   IV,    12. 10    |         related to different products/product groups~ ~Domain of objective