Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  5.  1|       disorders cause substantial impairment in social and working life,
 2   II,     5.  5.  3|           can lead to significant impairment in psychosocial functioning,
 3   II,     5.  5.  3|       cases where there is marked impairment of social interaction, communication,
 4   II,     5.  5.  3|        1983): Rating neurological impairment in multiple sclerosis and
 5   II,     5.  5.  3|       disease is diagnosed by its impairment in movements, it has become
 6   II,     5.  5.  3|         hallucinations, cognitive impairment) and gastrointestinal disturbances)
 7   II,     5.  5.  3|  relentlessly and leads to severe impairment and disability. In particular,
 8   II,     5.  5.  3|     Wittchen HU (2008): Cognitive impairment in 873 patients with idiopathic
 9   II,     5.  6.  3|           major cause of mobility impairment, particularly among females.~ ~
10   II,     5.  6.  3|           considerable functional impairment and possibly a loss of independence
11   II,     5.  6.  3|  associated to pain and long-term impairment of quality of life which
12   II,     5.  7.  1|      reasons: first because renal impairment may prelude to the development
13   II,     5.  9.  1|          and emotions, as well as impairment in activities and social
14   II,     5.  9.  3|  responsible for significant work impairment and more than a half of
15   II,     5.  9.  6|           also of quality of life impairment. Asthmatic symptoms deeply
16   II,     7.  4    |          injuries suffer lifelong impairment. Although not accurately
17   II,     8.  1.  1|          associated with lifelong impairment. Although not accurately
18   II,     8.  2.  1|       especially characterized by impairment of skills manifested during
19   II,     8.  2.  1|       SPID as the only associated impairment, while the others had between
20   II,     8.  2.  2|                     8.2.2. Visual impairment and blindness~ ~
21   II,     8.  2.  2|        economic effects of visual impairment can be divided into direct
22   II,     8.  2.  2|       that can result from visual impairment.~ ~
23   II,     8.  2.  2|           of blindness and visual impairment have been carried out. Surveys
24   II,     8.  2.  2|          available data on visual impairment (Pascolini et al, 2004)
25   II,     8.  2.  2|              Definitions~ ~Visual impairment includes low vision as well
26   II,     8.  2.  2|         correction (ICD-10 visual impairment categories 1 and 2). It
27   II,     8.  2.  2|       ICD-10 categories of visual impairment proposed in 2003 by a WHO
28   II,     8.  2.  2|       categories: moderate visual impairment (presenting visual acuity
29   II,     8.  2.  2|           6/60) and severe visual impairment (presenting visual acuity
30   II,     8.  2.  2|         correction (ICD-10 visual impairment categories 3, 4 and 5).~ ~
31   II,     8.  2.  2|          The definition of visual impairment in the International statistical
32   II,     8.  2.  2|       used to characterize visual impairment faced by people in daily
33   II,     8.  2.  2|          daily activities.~Visual impairment caused by uncorrected or
34   II,     8.  2.  2|     criteria, of survey of visual impairment, was carried out by Resnikoff
35   II,     8.  2.  2|         men to suffer from visual impairment. An estimation of the visual
36   II,     8.  2.  2|          estimation of the visual impairment due to uncorrected or inadequately
37   II,     8.  2.  2|     criteria, of survey of visual impairment, was carried out by Resnikoff
38   II,     8.  2.  2|         men to suffer from visual impairment. An estimation of the visual
39   II,     8.  2.  2|          estimation of the visual impairment due to uncorrected or inadequately
40   II,     8.  2.  2|        avoidable causes of visual impairment, including inadequately
41   II,     8.  2.  2|      doubling of avoidable visual impairment between 1990 and 2020. The
42   II,     8.  2.  2|    avoidable blindness and visual impairment’, which expanded on the
43   II,     8.  2.  2|           of blindness and visual impairment remain disease control,
44   II,     8.  2.  2|    prevention of avoidable visual impairment will be achieved only if
45   II,     8.  2.  2|       1999): Prevalence of visual impairment in children: a review of
46   II,     8.  2.  2|          available data on visual impairment: a compilation of population-based
47   II,     8.  2.  2|             Global data on visual impairment in the year 2002. Bulletin
48   II,     8.  2.  2|        Global magnitude of visual impairment caused by uncorrected refractive
49   II,     8.  2.  3|            Introduction~ ~Hearing impairment is the most frequent sensory
50   II,     8.  2.  3|           Consequences of hearing impairment include inability to interpret
51   II,     8.  2.  3|         of definitions of hearing impairment, thus, comparison among
52   II,     8.  2.  3|        WHO has classified hearing impairment according to the hearing
53   II,     8.  2.  3|       different grades of hearing impairment and their impact in performance
54   II,     8.  2.  3|          the prevalence of slight impairment (26-40dBHL) has been estimated,
55   II,     8.  2.  3|          4. WHO grades of hearing impairment~ ~ ~ ~
56   II,     8.  2.  3|        subjects showed no hearing impairment ( 25 dB HL), 7.7% showed
57   II,     8.  2.  3|         The prevalence of hearing impairment and reported hearing disability
58   II,     8.  2.  3|       permanent childhood hearing impairment in Trent~Region, 1985-1993.
59   II,     8.  2.  3|             Prevalence of hearing impairment in a population in Sweden.
60   II,     8.  2.  3|             Prevalence of hearing impairment and subjective hearing problems
61   II,     8.  2.  3|           of Deafness and Hearing Impairment. (WHO/PDH/97.3.) Geneva:
62   II,     9        |       stage. A physical or mental impairment clearly can affect normal
63   II,     9        |     living, depression, cognitive impairment, and being aged over 80.
64   II,     9.  1.  1|   moderate to severe intellectual impairment. Other children have a mild
65   II,     9.  1.  1|         or only mild intellectual impairment. As shown in Table 9.1.1.
66   II,     9.  2.  3|           number of children with impairment or disability, or the number
67   II,     9.  2.  4|       stage. A physical or mental impairment clearly can affect normal
68   II,     9.  2.  6|         different ages;~ ~· Child impairment, disability, and special
69   II,     9.  2.  6|          and impact assessment of impairment and disability in children
70   II,     9.  3.  1|        includes the risk of renal impairment.~ ~Pelvic floor and urinary
71   II,     9.  3.  1|          trajectory of increasing impairment. More research is needed
72   II,     9.  4.  2|      condition may have different impairment and thus present a differing
73   II,     9.  4.  4|     living, depression, cognitive impairment, and being aged over 80.
74   II,     9.  4.  6|        some physical or cognitive impairment as a result of the ageing
75  III,    10.  2.  1|     provided strong evidence that impairment in driving skills begins
76  III,    10.  2.  1|      years, and particularly with impairment of attention and visuospatial
77  III,    10.  2.  1|     physiological changes such as impairment of taste and smell, dysphagia
78  III,    10.  3.  1|         noise, apart from hearing impairment and annoyance, are interference
79  III,    10.  3.  1|      cause of concern for hearing impairment.~ ~Noise is a potentially
80  III,    10.  3.  1| cardiovascular disease, cognitive impairment in children, hearing impairment
81  III,    10.  3.  1|   impairment in children, hearing impairment due to leisure noise, tinnitus,