Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  1.  1|            imbalanced diet; hepatic cirrhosis and other chronic liver
 2   II,     5.  1.  1|             10 months of age.~Liver Cirrhosis~The patterns in mortality
 3   II,     5.  1.  1|          patterns in mortality from cirrhosis are largely attributable
 4   II,     5. 12    |                         5.12. Liver cirrhosis~ ~
 5   II,     5. 12.  1|             late 1970s, the highest cirrhosis mortality rates (around
 6   II,     5. 12.  1|        Subsequently, mortality from cirrhosis tended to decline in Southern
 7   II,     5. 12.  1|             substantial increase in cirrhosis mortality over the last
 8   II,     5. 12.  1|             reviewed mortality from cirrhosis up to 2002,and quantified
 9   II,     5. 12.  1|          patterns in mortality from cirrhosis are largely due to changes
10   II,     5. 12.  1|       obtain a favourable impact on cirrhosis.~In relation to the important
11   II,     5. 12.  1|            and HCV in causing liver cirrhosis, this Chapter can be read
12   II,     5. 12.  2|           certification numbers for cirrhosis over the period 1970-2002
13   II,     5. 12.  2|           procedures of deaths from cirrhosis during this period, classification
14   II,     5. 12.  2|           period, classification of cirrhosis deaths was recoded, for
15   II,     5. 12.  3|          Graphic representations of cirrhosis mortality for men and women
16   II,     5. 12.  3|            certification rates from cirrhosis in men at all ages and at
17   II,     5. 12.  3|    population) mortality rates from cirrhosis per 100,000 men at all ages
18   II,     5. 12.  3|        substantial declines in male cirrhosis mortality were observed
19   II,     5. 12.  3|       countries had the lowest male cirrhosis mortality in 2000-02, together
20   II,     5. 12.  3|            the favourable trends of cirrhosis mortality in European men:
21   II,     5. 12.  3|       Hungary, where mortality from cirrhosis rose from 33.9 in 1980-82
22   II,     5. 12.  3|        difference in mortality from cirrhosis in European men, although
23   II,     5. 12.  3|            35-64 years of age) from cirrhosis in men were similar to those
24   II,     5. 12.  3|           high mortality rates from cirrhosis in middle-aged men (around
25   II,     5. 12.  3|          000).~Mortality rates from cirrhosis were lower in women from
26   II,     5. 12.  3|      truncated mortality rates from cirrhosis (around 24-30/100,000).~ ~
27   II,     5. 12.  3|    population) mortality rates from cirrhosis per 100,000 women at all
28   II,     5. 12.  3|    joinpoint regression analysis of cirrhosis mortality rates over the
29   II,     5. 12.  3|           countries, mortality from cirrhosis was still steadily rising,
30   II,     5. 12.  3|       analysis for age-standardized cirrhosis mortality rates in men from
31   II,     5. 12.  3|       analysis for age-standardized cirrhosis mortality rates in women
32   II,     5. 12.  3|          analysis of mortality from cirrhosis shows a general favourable
33   II,     5. 12.  3|            2000s had extremely high cirrhosis mortality.~Changes in trends
34   II,     5. 12.  3|          due to changed validity of cirrhosis diagnosis and certification,
35   II,     5. 12.  3|   Improvements in the management of cirrhosisincluding endoscopic banding,
36   II,     5. 12.  3|       classification as deaths from cirrhosis of deaths from acute liver
37   II,     5. 12.  4|          patterns in mortality from cirrhosis are largely due to changes
38   II,     5. 12.  4|            and HCV (see Chapter 6), cirrhosis mortality trends and their
39   II,     5. 12.  4|            by comparable changes in cirrhosis mortality. Historically,
40   II,     5. 12.  4|            substantial variation in cirrhosis mortality following sudden
41   II,     5. 12.  4|             alcohol consumption and cirrhosis mortality declined substantially.
42   II,     5. 12.  4|             Thus, earlier excess of cirrhosis mortality in countries of
43   II,     5. 12.  4|         rises in the mortality from cirrhosis in Ireland and the UK (particularly
44   II,     5. 12.  4|            winemay have affected cirrhosis mortality, there is no doubt
45   II,     5. 12.  4|          increase of mortality from cirrhosis.~ ~
46   II,     5. 12.  5|         policy for the avoidance of cirrhosis and other chronic liver
47   II,     5. 12.  5|       obtain a favourable impact on cirrhosis (mortality), and should
48   II,     5. 12.  5| consequently, their contribution to cirrhosis mortality trends is difficult
49   II,     5. 12.  5|            secondary prevention for cirrhosis and no diagnostic test or
50   II,     5. 12.  5|           population level to avoid cirrhosis.~In subjects with cirrhosis,
51   II,     5. 12.  5|         cirrhosis.~In subjects with cirrhosis, it is possible to reduce
52   II,     5. 12.  5|             secondary prevention of cirrhosis complication and death.
53   II,     5. 12.  5|          and Northern Europe, where cirrhosis incidence and mortality
54   II,     5. 12.  6|       explain short-term changes in cirrhosis mortality at population
55   II,     5. 12.  6|         level. Sudden variations in cirrhosis mortality are real and follow
56   II,     5. 12.  6|          treatment and prognosis of cirrhosis has been provided by the
57   II,     5. 12.  6|   introduction of this procedure on cirrhosis mortality at national level
58   II,     5. 12.  6|            quantifyproportion of cirrhosis cases, liver transplantation
59   II,     5. 12.  6|           to liver cancer following cirrhosis, rather than to cirrhosis
60   II,     5. 12.  6|           cirrhosis, rather than to cirrhosis itself.~ ~A wider adoption
61   II,     5. 12.  6|          treatment and prognosis of cirrhosis, but evaluation and quantification
62   II,     5. 12.  7|            Worldwide mortality from cirrhosis: an update to 2002. J Hepatol
63   II,     5. 12.  7|              1997): Trends of liver cirrhosis mortality in Europe, 1970-
64   II,     5. 12.  7|           risk of symptomatic liver cirrhosis. Hepatology 27:914-919.~ ~
65   II,     5. 12.  7|             in mortality from liver cirrhosis, 1955 to 1990. Ann Epidemiol
66   II,     5. 12.  7|         McCambridge J (2006): Liver cirrhosis mortality rates in Britain,
67   II,     5. 12.  7|        transplantation in alcoholic cirrhosis using matched and simulated
68   II,     5. 12.  7|       alcohol consumption and liver cirrhosis mortality in 14 European
69   II,     5. 12.  7|             Afdhal NH (2008): Liver Cirrhosis. Lancet 371: 83851~ ~Shapiro
70   II,     6.  3.  3|          infected can develop liver cirrhosis (25%) or cancer (5%), and
71   II,     6.  3.  3|        those go on to develop liver cirrhosis or cancer. Injecting drug
72  III,    10.  2.  1|         increases the risk of liver cirrhosis and acute and chronic pancreatitis.
73  III,    10.  2.  1|            almost 3 times) of liver cirrhosis (Figure 10.2.1.2.2).~ ~Figure
74  III,    10.  2.  1|             Alcohol consumption and cirrhosis rates in southern Europe~ ~
75  III,    10.  2.  1|            45,000 deaths from liver cirrhosis~- 50,000 cancer deaths,
76  III,    10.  2.  1|           to be mainly due to liver cirrhosis and alcohol-related cancers,
77  III,    10.  2.  1|     reductions in deaths from liver cirrhosis, mortality rates from traffic
78  III,    10.  2.  1|        health (infectious diseases, cirrhosis, cancer) problems typical
79   IV,    12.  2    |     reductions in deaths from liver cirrhosis, fatality rates from traffic
80  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|       chromium~cigarette~cigarettes~cirrhosis~clenbuterol~climacteric~