Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.  4    |          cardiovascular disease, many cancers, and injury.~ ~These inequalities
 2   II,     4.  2    |             impact of smoking related cancers for women was considerably
 3   II,     4.  2    |           Mortality by gynaecological cancers (cause 4 in table 3) had
 4   II,     4.  2    |         decline in mortality by these cancers had a positive impact on
 5   II,     4.  2    |             and other smoking related cancers, as smoking also affects
 6   II,     4.  2    |                Table 4.2.5 shows that cancers caused by smoking had a
 7   II,     4.  2    |             impact of smoking related cancers reduced in the 1990s, even
 8   II,     4.  2    |             effect of smoking related cancers for women occurred later
 9   II,     4.  2    |            the 1990s, smoking related cancers had a negative impact on
10   II,     4.  2    |             effect of smoking related cancers on life expectancy at birth,
11   II,     5.  1.  1|             Cancer ~ ~The majority of cancers can be attributed to the
12   II,     5.  2.  1|          killing more people than all cancers combined with a higher percentage
13   II,     5.  3.  1|             rate is the number of new cancers in a year over the population
14   II,     5.  3.  1|        information is provided on all cancers combined and on a selection
15   II,     5.  3.  1|              cancer killer in Europe; cancers of female breast, colorectal
16   II,     5.  3.  1|        activity; prostate and stomach cancers for their public health
17   II,     5.  3.  3|             ICD-9 code 180), prostate cancers (ICD-9 code 185), and all
18   II,     5.  3.  3|              ICD-9 code 185), and all cancers combined (ICD-9 codes 140-
19   II,     5.  3.  4|             factors~ ~The majority of cancers can be attributed to the
20   II,     5.  3.  5|       incidence data discussion~ ~All cancers (ICD-9 140 - 239)~This category
21   II,     5.  3.  5|              except non-melanoma skin cancers (specifically ICD-9 codes
22   II,     5.  3.  5|         deaths were estimated for all cancers all around Europe (Ferlay
23   II,     5.  3.  5|              detecting early invasive cancers (Parkin et al, 2005). The
24   II,     5.  3.  5|       incidence) of positive prostate cancers prognosis.~Prostate cancer
25   II,     5.  3.  6|              trends for all childhood cancers combined were estimated
26   II,     5.  3.  6|               trends for 14 childhood cancers were also estimated.~For
27   II,     5.  3.  6|          estimated.~For all childhood cancers combined, 5-years survival
28   II,     5.  3.  6|              all individual childhood cancers considered. The most marked
29   II,     5.  3.  6|            1990-1994~Survival for all cancers reflects the case mix by
30   II,     5.  3.  6|            survival for all malignant cancers not only adjusted by age
31   II,     5.  3.  6|                   Figure 5.3.29a. All cancers (ICD9 140-172, 174-208)
32   II,     5.  3.  6|               Men~Figure 5.3.29b. All cancers (ICD9 140-172, 174-208)
33   II,     5.  3.  6|           reflect the more aggressive cancers for which screening has
34   II,     5.  3.  6|             for colorectal and breast cancers.~Increases in survival and
35   II,     5.  3.  6|             02 was estimated.~For all cancers, age-adjusted 5-year period
36   II,     5.  3.  6|          colorectal, breast, prostate cancers. The European mean 5-year
37   II,     5.  3.  7|           exist for about one half of cancers. Thus, primary prevention
38   II,     5.  3.  7|               colorectal and cervical cancers are the three most frequent
39   II,     5.  3.  7|               the three most frequent cancers amongst women and colorectal
40   II,     5.  3.  7|              one of the most frequent cancers also in the male population.
41   II,     5.  3.  9|              Survival for eight major cancers and all cancers combined
42   II,     5.  3.  9|           eight major cancers and all cancers combined for European adults
43   II,     5. 11.  3|               Rare Diseases”).~ ~Skin cancers~Melanoma and non-melanoma (
44   II,     5. 11.  3|          demand, associated with skin cancers, is currently stretched
45   II,     5. 11.  4|         people when compared to other cancers (melanoma comprises 1-2%
46   II,     5. 11.  4|        Several other less common skin cancers such as Merkel cell tumours,
47   II,     5. 11.  7|                 Non-melanomatous skin cancers between the years of 1990
48   II,     5. 14.  1|        mucosal lesions, oropharyngeal cancers and dental trauma are major
49   II,     9.  3.  1|               and the gender-specific cancers are excluded, men develop
50   II,     9.  3.  1|               can lead to fat related cancers, such as cancer of the breast,
51   II,     9.  3.  1|               aetiology of some human cancers, including breast, endometrium
52   II,     9.  3.  1|              Whereas for common adult cancers, such as lung and colon
53   II,     9.  3.  1|                such as lung and colon cancers, incidence rises continuously
54   II,     9.  3.  1|            for most hormone-dependent cancers. Worldwide, breast cancer
55   II,     9.  4.  3|           cardiovascular diseases and cancers, can be a major cause of
56   II,     9.  5.  3|          contracting diseases such as cancers. Restricted lifestyles,
57  III,    10.  2.  1|                24 of which are fatal. Cancers (43%), cardiovascular diseases (
58  III,    10.  2.  1|           caused by second-hand smoke~Cancers~Chronic diseases~Childen~
59  III,    10.  2.  1|         active cigarette smoking.~ ~ ~Cancers~Respiratory diseases and
60  III,    10.  2.  1|                Keil U, et al., 1998).~Cancers (see Chapter 5.3) of the
61  III,    10.  2.  1|               deaths in the EU. These cancers are mainly due to smoking (
62  III,    10.  2.  1|             cancer (Boy ). Especially cancers of the oral cavity and pancreas
63  III,    10.  2.  1|        exposure increases the risk of cancers of the mouth, oesophagus (
64  III,    10.  2.  1|            and - to a lesser extent - cancers of the stomach, colon and
65  III,    10.  2.  1|         cirrhosis and alcohol-related cancers, the latter finds this related
66  III,    10.  2.  1|                heart disease, stroke, cancers, diabetes and mental illness (
67  III,    10.  2.  1|                heart disease, stroke, cancers, diabetes and mental illness (
68  III,    10.  2.  1|          defects, oral and pharyngeal cancers, periodontal disease, dental
69  III,    10.  3.  1|              that an increase in skin cancers in the Western European
70  III,    10.  3.  1|            proven cancer burden. Lung cancers in children are extremely
71  III,    10.  3.  1|               connection between skin cancers and exposure to UV radiation (
72  III,    10.  3.  1|      approximately 80-90% of all skin cancers can be related to UVR. In
73  III,    10.  3.  2|         puberty, thyroid function and cancers in hormone-dependent tissues.
74  III,    10.  3.  2|    established. Breast and testicular cancers are increasing in Europe
75  III,    10.  6.  2| cardiovascular disease, many types of cancers, and injury.~ ~ ~The final
76  III,    10.  6.  2|   respectively, and that injuries and cancers, particularly lung cancer,
77   IV,    11.  5.  4|             of for different types of cancers has been described in scientific
78   IV,    13.  2.  3|          Cardiovascular diseases, all cancers~100,000-300,000~5 dietary
79   IV,    13.  7.  3|               metabolic disorders and cancers in infants, and heart transplantation
80  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|            cancerogens~cancer-related~cancers~candida~candidiasis~cannabis~