Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     6.  3.  4|             milk or through laboratory contamination. Only 10% of people infected
 2   II,     6.  3.  6|   food-processing level to prevent the contamination of food products. Preventive
 3  III,    10.  1    |           diseases~water, air and food contamination~climate change-related changes
 4  III,    10.  3.  2|         hazards, such as transboundary contamination by persistent toxic substances,
 5  III,    10.  3.  2|           diseases~water, air and food contamination~climate change-related changes
 6  III,    10.  3.  2|                in accidental cases, as contamination in products or from natural
 7  III,    10.  3.  2|                large scale atmospheric contamination from platinum, palladium
 8  III,    10.  3.  3|             milk or through laboratory contamination. Legionnairesdisease is
 9  III,    10.  3.  4|            flooding), sewage and waste contamination of the drinking-water supply,
10  III,    10.  3.  4|               Flooding may lead to the contamination of water systems with dangerous
11  III,    10.  3.  4|          relationship between chemical contamination and the pattern of morbidity
12  III,    10.  3.  4|           outbreaks had been reported, contamination of water supplies and food
13  III,    10.  3.  4|             the risk of possible water contamination and advised them to use
14  III,    10.  4.  2|                4.2. Ingestion and food contamination/naturally occurring toxic
15  III,    10.  4.  2|           challenges, such as BSE, the contamination of food with dioxins and
16  III,    10.  4.  2|      notifications for microbiological contamination and for the use of illegal
17  III,    10.  4.  2|              viral and bacteriological contamination of bivalve molluscs;~• Listeria
18  III,    10.  4.  2|         contagion of other animals or~ contamination of the consumers;~· harmonisation
19  III,    10.  4.  2|              by historical and current contamination with POPs and other toxic
20  III,    10.  4.  2|               persistant environmental contamination. These findings, however,
21  III,    10.  4.  2|                  the potential for the contamination of groundwater above parametric
22  III,    10.  4.  2|             assessment for groundwater contamination; the FOCUS surface water
23  III,    10.  4.  3|           Ingestion and drinking water contamination and sanitation~ ~
24  III,    10.  4.  3|                diseases arise from the contamination of water by pathogenic viruses,
25  III,    10.  4.  3|           human activities cause water contamination with heavy metals, industrial
26  III,    10.  4.  3|                waters resulting in the contamination of raw water supplies. In
27  III,    10.  4.  3|              illness), two by chemical contamination (0.1% of cases of illness),
28  III,    10.  4.  3|              sewage water resulting in contamination of raw water supplies. A
29  III,    10.  4.  3|              at minimising the risk of contamination by taking adequate preventive
30  III,    10.  4.  3|                are the minimization of contamination of source waters, the reduction
31  III,    10.  4.  3|                reduction or removal of contamination through appropriate treatment
32  III,    10.  4.  3|        processes and the prevention of contamination in the distribution network
33  III,    10.  4.  3|             should be taken in case of contamination to prevent negative health
34  III,    10.  4.  3|               s scope. Microbiological contamination and also chemical contamination
35  III,    10.  4.  3|        contamination and also chemical contamination of small water supplies
36  III,    10.  4.  5|                 bathing water and soil contamination/waste disposal~ ~ ~
37  III,    10.  4.  5|             the environment or through contamination by the bathers themselves.
38  III,    10.  4.  5|               countries. The source of contamination can sometimes be determined
39  III,    10.  4.  5|  microbiological indicators for faecal contamination, E. Coli and Intestinal
40  III,    10.  4.  5|          Organisation~ ~Introduction~ ~Contamination from local sources and air
41  III,    10.  4.  5|                activities causing soil contamination in Europe~ ~Inadequate waste
42  III,    10.  4.  5|                of soil and groundwater contamination in South Eastern Europe (
43  III,    10.  4.  5|          increased from 20-39%.~ ~Soil contamination~ ~Figure 10.4.5.2.4. Overview
44  III,    10.  4.  5|          activities causing local soil contamination per country~ ~Figure 10.
45  III,    10.  4.  5|                activities causing soil contamination per country~ ~Figure 10.
46  III,    10.  4.  5|             Europe. On the other hand, contamination from oil storage is relatively
47  III,    10.  4.  5|       represent 27 % of all sources of contamination, while in Estonia military
48  III,    10.  4.  5|                of soil and groundwater contamination. Industrial sources mainly
49  III,    10.  4.  5|               frequent sources of soil contamination in Luxembourg (84 % of all
50  III,    10.  4.  5|                cleaning as a source of contamination is high, accounting for
51  III,    10.  4.  5|           assessment of the impacts of contamination has to be evaluated on a
52  III,    10.  4.  5|              remediation of historical contamination, as many of the legally
53  III,    10.  4.  5|              identify sites at risk of contamination and establish national inventories.
54  III,    10.  4.  5|             concentrated on historical contamination.~ ~ ~Contaminated sites
55  III,    10.  4.  5|           effective management of soil contamination from local sources. As of
56  III,    10.  4.  5|             Europe, the real extent of contamination is unknown because systematic
57  III,    10.  4.  5|                to clean-up a legacy of contamination (EEA, 2007a).~ ~Waste management~ ~
58  III,    10.  5.  1|                triggered by biological contamination and bacteria as well as
59  III,    10.  5.  1|              supplies. Microbiological contamination of small water supplies
60  III,    10.  5.  1|                et al, 2006), microbial contamination from fungi and bacteria (
61  III,    10.  5.  1|                 and furry pet allergen contamination from cat and dogs (Kim et
62  III,    10.  5.  1|         disease.~ ~Sealed-off land and contamination~ ~As settlement areas are
63   IV,    12. 10    |            Wallonia~Regional~ Yes~Soil contamination and waste disposal~High~
64   IV,    12. 10    |        recreational water~ High~ ~Soil contamination and waste disposal~ High~ ~
65   IV,    12. 10    |           Directive is ongoing.~ ~Soil contamination and waste disposal~High
66   IV,    12. 10    |            Federal Soil Protection and Contamination Ordinance (BbodSchV) 1999.
67   IV,    12. 10    |               suggest that the overall contamination of foodstuff in Germany
68   IV,    12. 10    |           Waters Regulations.~ ~ ~Soil contamination and waste disposal~High~
69   IV,    12. 10    |             etc) for saving water~Soil contamination and waste disposal~ High~
70   IV,    12. 10    |     environment 2003-2008 http ~ ~Soil contamination and waste disposal~ high~ ~
71   IV,    12. 10    |          Public Health Strategy~ ~Soil contamination and waste disposal~intermediate~
72   IV,    12. 10    |              of drinking water.~ ~Soil contamination and waste disposal~ High~
73   IV,    12. 10    |              environmental health~Soil contamination and waste disposal~ High~
74   IV,    12. 10    |       recreational water~High~ ~ ~Soil contamination and waste disposal~Intermediate~ ~ ~
75   IV,    13.  2.  3|            loss due to microbiological contamination of food is comparable to
76   IV,    13.  2.  3|                In the case of chemical contamination, the health loss is lower
77   IV,    13.  2.  3|                Factors~Microbiological contamination~Chemical contamination~Other
78   IV,    13.  2.  3| Microbiological contamination~Chemical contamination~Other lifestyle factors~