Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  5.  3|       Hematologic, Biochemical, and Bone Density Parameters in Community-Dwelling
 2   II,     5.  6.Acr|                      Acronyms~ ~BMD~Bone Mineral Density~DALYs~Disability
 3   II,     5.  6.  1|      arthritis, osteoarthritis; (2) bone conditions e.g. osteoporosis
 4   II,     5.  6.  1|              through support of the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010
 5   II,     5.  6.  2|              University of Oslo and Bone and Joint Decade, 2003 (
 6   II,     5.  6.  2|      practitioner and policy maker. Bone and Joint Decade, Lund 2005 (
 7   II,     5.  6.  3|       experienced long-term muscle, bone and joint problems such
 8   II,     5.  6.  3|      associated with hypertrophy of bone (osteophytes and subchondral
 9   II,     5.  6.  3|         osteophytes and subchondral bone sclerosis) and thickening
10   II,     5.  6.  3|      disease characterized by a low bone mass and a microarchitectural
11   II,     5.  6.  3| microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue, with a consequent
12   II,     5.  6.  3|            a consequent increase in bone fragility and susceptibility
13   II,     5.  6.  3|             basis of measurement of bone mineral density (BMD). The
14   II,     5.  6.  3|             fracture rises when the bone mineral density (BMD) declines,
15   II,     5.  6.  3|             2.5).~ ~Osteopenia (low bone mass): a BMD value between
16   II,     5.  6.  3|           fracture are falling, low bone mass, i.e. osteoporosis,
17   II,     5.  6.  3|        factors for fracture such as bone turnover as assessed by
18   II,     5.  6.  3|             turnover as assessed by bone markers. Frailty and co-morbidity
19   II,     5.  6.  3|           men or women with reduced bone strength. The risk of falling
20   II,     5.  6.  3|             5.6.9. Risk factors for bone loss, development of osteoporosis
21   II,     5.  6.  3|         elderly (excluding falls)~ ~Bone density has the strongest
22   II,     5.  6.  3|        increases when combining low bone density with the presence
23   II,     5.  6.  3|            fracture. In particular, bone density combined with risk
24   II,     5.  6.  3|         least partly independent of bone density (Cummings et al,
25   II,     5.  6.  4|             as major reason muscle, bone and joint problems (Eurobarometer
26   II,     5.  6.  6|         Health, ISBN 91-975284-0-4. Bone and Joint Decade Lund, Sweden.
27   II,     5.  6.  6|        osteoporosis study (EPOS). J Bone Miner Res 17:716-724~Felson
28   II,     5.  6.  6|            on screening strategies. Bone 30:251-258~Kanis JA, Johnell
29   II,     5.  6.  6|        osteopenia and osteoporosis. Bone 27:585-590~Kanis JA and
30   II,     5.  6.  6|           the general population. J Bone Miner Res 18:1139-1141~Merx
31   II,     5.  6.  6|    prevalent vertebral fractures. J Bone Miner Res 15:1384-1392~Oliveria
32   II,     5.  6.  6|     fractures in England and Wales. Bone 29:517-522~WHO (1994): Assessment
33   II,     5.  6.  6|            806~Woolf AD (2000): The bone and joint decade 2000-2010.
34   II,     5.  7.  7|             practice guidelines for bone metabolism and disease in
35   II,     5.  8.  3|          out for angina, cataracts, bone fractures, osteoporosis,
36   II,     9.  3.  1|            are affected by enhanced bone fragility and an increased
37   II,     9.  3.  1|            osteoporosis and related bone fractures increase with
38   II,     9.  3.  1|    fractures increase with age. Low bone mass at menopause can be
39   II,     9.  3.  1|          can be due to insufficient bone acquisition during growth
40   II,     9.  3.  1|        acquisition during growth or bone loss during adulthood. Ovarian
41   II,     9.  3.  1|            in skeletal homeostasis. Bone loss accelerates for a few
42   II,     9.  3.  1|           significantly to skeletal bone loss is not completely understood.
43   II,     9.  3.  1|           understood. Postmenopause bone loss may be exacerbated
44   II,     9.  3.  1|          low calcium intake. Severe bone loss and fractures are not
45   II,     9.  3.  1|         non-invasive measurement of bone mineral density (BMD). Fracture
46   II,     9.  3.  1|          for osteoporosis, although bone density is only one of many
47   II,     9.  3.  1|     effective methods for detecting bone loss, many people are not
48   II,     9.  3.  1|             prevent further loss of bone mass or fractures until
49   II,     9.  3.  1|           to have larger accrual of bone mass during puberty; as
50   II,     9.  3.  1|     consequence, men tend to suffer bone fractures approximately
51   II,     9.  3.  1|            intranasal spray.~ ~Oral bone loss. Oral bone, like the
52   II,     9.  3.  1|                Oral bone loss. Oral bone, like the rest of the skeleton,
53   II,     9.  3.  1|             trabecular and cortical bone and undergoes formation
54   II,     9.  3.  1|             the lifespan. When oral bone loss exceeds gain, it manifests
55   II,     9.  3.  1|              The prevalence of oral bone loss is significant among
56   II,     9.  3.  1|            age for both sexes. Oral bone loss and attendant tooth
57   II,     9.  3.  1|           useful signs of extraoral bone diminution. Non pharmacologic
58   II,     9.  3.  1|       approaches to preserving oral bone include smoking cessation
59   II,     9.  3.  1|             may yield positive oral bone effects.~ ~Uterine bleeding.
60   II,     9.  3.  1|       muscle strength, a decline in bone mineral density and changes
61   II,     9.  3.  1|     assessment should be performed. Bone and erectile function may
62   II,     9.  3.  1|         Smith MR (2005): Changes in bone mineral density and body
63   II,     9.  3.  1|             Replacement Therapy~BMD~Bone Mineral Density~BMI~Body
64  III,    10.  2.  1|            cervix~- Breast cancer~- Bone marrow (myeloid leukaemia)
65  III,    10.  2.  1|       activities. At the same time, bone mass decreases with age
66  III,    10.  2.  1|          for osteoporosis and hence bone fractures as the vitamin
67  III,    10.  2.  1|    especially necessary to maintain bone health. This is of particular
68  III,    10.  2.  1|      childhood and adolescence when bone mass is built up, determining
69  III,    10.  2.  1|           built up, determining the bone mass density in later life.
70  III,    10.  2.  1|             older adults can retard bone loss and reduce the risk
71  III,    10.  2.  1|    sufficient.~o Physical activity. Bone density responses to increased
72  III,    10.  2.  1|           of exercise that promotes bone response may be different
73  III,    10.  2.  1|      exercise are required to alter bone density. Where not medically
74  III,    10.  2.  1|             vitamin D nutrition and bone disease of the elderly.
75  III,    10.  3.  1|             de-calcification of the bone (rickets). The negative
76   IV,    11.  5.  2|        Transplantation: htt Spanish Bone Marrow Donors Registry (
77   IV,    13.  7    |        tissues and cells of covers: bone, cartilage, tendons, arteries,
78  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|  blood-borne~bluetongue~body weight~bone~bordetella~borreliosis~bottle-fed~