Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.  5    |            which can lead to risks of stress and violence at work. The
 2    I,     2.  5    |        workers face the challenges of stress and the associated health
 3    I,     2.  5    |               there are high risks of stress, violence and psychosocial
 4    I,     2.  5    |            can result in work-related stress. Studies have showed that
 5    I,     2.  5    |              increase in work-related stress also increases cardiovascular
 6    I,     2.  5    |          overloads’ and psychological stress are not restricted to older
 7    I,     2.  5    |           contributes to work-related stress, which also increases cardiovascular
 8    I,     2.  5    |               In the EU, work-related stress is now believed to affect
 9    I,     2.  5    |         People living under long-term stress are known to be more vulnerable
10   II,     5.  1.  1|              exercise and exposure to stress, remains essential in order
11   II,     5.  1.  1|     tobacco smoke (ETS); lead; noise; stress.~ ~The risk factors identified
12   II,     5.  1.  1|        excessive alcohol consumption, stress, and diabetes mellitus.
13   II,     5.  2.  3|           high level of psycho-social stress may explain the increase
14   II,     5.  2.  4|          consumption and psychosocial stress (see the attached European
15   II,     5.  5.Int|            symptoms of post-traumatic stress, and subsequent difficulty
16   II,     5.  5.Int|        extended period can experience stress, difficulty in personal
17   II,     5.  5.Int|    disabilities and the prevention of stress at the workplace, including: (
18   II,     5.  5.Int|             Agreement on work-related Stress between social partners
19   II,     5.  5.  1|                and reaction to severe stress including adjustment disorders.
20   II,     5.  5.  1|               Anxiety, Depression and Stress Related Disorders in Europe (
21   II,     5.  5.  1|           promotion and prevention of stress, anxiety, depression and
22   II,     5.  5.  1|   disabilities, and the prevention of stress at workplaces.~ ~
23   II,     5.  5.  1|                594-600.~ ~C J (2008). Stress, genes and the biology of
24   II,     5.  5.  3|              orthopaedic injuries and stress fractures, ruptured oesophagus,
25   II,     5.  9.  4|        modifications due to oxidative stress. Partners are developing
26   II,     5. 14.  4|        excessive alcohol consumption, stress, and diabetes mellitus.
27   II,     9.  3.  1|            symptoms of post-traumatic stress, and subsequent difficulty
28   II,     9.  3.  1|         period of time can experience stress, difficulty in a personal
29   II,     9.  3.  1|              factors such as obesity, stress and hypertension in diabetic
30   II,     9.  3.  1|           affect the vulnerability to stress and depression.~ ~In a study
31   II,     9.  3.  1|          incontinence, especially for stress and urge incontinence.~ ~
32   II,     9.  4.  5|         health. Recognising caregiver stress and assisting the informal
33   II,     9.  5.  1|             increases in psychosocial stress and poor health in women,
34   II,     9.  5.  3|            itself as back pain (30%), stress (28%), muscular pains in
35   II,     9.  5.  3|            order to relax and relieve stress. Australian research has
36   II,     9.  5.  3|            severe depression, chronic stress, oppressive racial or sexual
37  III,    10.  1    |           food, e.g. high cholesterol~stress~ ~Respiratory diseases,
38  III,    10.  1.  1|               drinking, psychological stress, low self-esteem, and a
39  III,    10.  1.  1|              as reduction of anxiety, stress, and worries (Bondy, 1996;
40  III,    10.  1.  1|            alcohol use depends on the stress level and the individuals’
41  III,    10.  1.  1|               1998; Milgram, 1993).~ ~Stress is also considered as a
42  III,    10.  1.  1|           cause or the consequence of stress and stressful life events.
43  III,    10.  1.  1|               alcohol consumption and stress is complex and modified
44  III,    10.  1.  3|          Sonne SC (1999): The role of stress in alcohol use, alcoholism
45  III,    10.  2.  1|               diet, smoking, alcohol, stress improvements – is an effective
46  III,    10.  2.  1|               diet, smoking, alcohol, stress improvements – is an effective
47  III,    10.  2.  1|             depression and, possibly, stress and anxiety. Moreover, regular
48  III,    10.  2.  1|             protection from oxidative stress, a co-factor of the glutathione
49  III,    10.  2.  1|           level of physical activity, stress, smoking and alcohol consumption
50  III,    10.  2.  5|              associated physiological stress responses, and ultimately,
51  III,    10.  3.  2|           food, e.g. high cholesterol~stress~ ~Respiratory diseases,
52  III,    10.  3.  4| drinking-water supply, post-traumatic stress disorders and poisoning
53  III,    10.  3.  4|             of family possessions and stress in dealing with builders
54  III,    10.  3.  4|              review of post-traumatic stress disorders in high-income
55  III,    10.  4.  1|               sources. The continuing stress on energy-saving policies
56  III,    10.  4.  5|            effect on property values, stress for lack of regulatory response
57  III,    10.  5.  1|       physiological and psychological stress reactions in pupils (Wålinder
58  III,    10.  5.  1|             health, concentration and stress levels (Stansfeld et al,
59  III,    10.  5.  1|       Physiological and psychological stress reactions in relation to
60  III,    10.  5.  2|          authors conclude that higher stress and less stable social conditions
61  III,    10.  5.  3|               pains, overall fatigue, stress and headache (table 10.5.
62  III,    10.  5.  3|               more often headache and stress as a health impact of their
63  III,    10.  5.  3|           overload’ and psychological stress are not restricted to older
64  III,    10.  5.  3|            which can lead to risks of stress and violence at work. The
65  III,    10.  5.  3|               there are high risks of stress, violence and psychosocial
66  III,    10.  5.  3|            can result in work-related stress. Studies have shown that
67  III,    10.  5.  3|              increase in work-related stress also increases cardiovascular
68  III,    10.  5.  3|           contributes to work-related stress, which also increases cardiovascular
69  III,    10.  5.  3|              with new types of risks (stress, depression, violence etc.)~-
70  III,    10.  5.  3|              T. (1990). Healthy Work: Stress, Productivity, and the Reconstruction
71  III,    10.  6.  1|            the predictors of parental stress in mothers and fathers of
72  III,    10.  6.  1|           social support and parental stress (Saisto et al., 2008).~ ~
73  III,    10.  6.  1|            the predictors of parental stress in mothers and fathers of
74  III,    10.  6.  2|              demands and psychosocial stress. Most health determinants
75   IV,    13.  6.  1|              on the child;~· Anxiety, stress, and possibly loss of earning
76  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|     stillbirths~stomach~streptococcus~stress~stroke~suicidal~suicide~