Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.  4    |           efforts aimed at successful educational outcomes for each child,
 2    I,     2.  4    |              among those with a lower educational level, occupational class
 3    I,     2.  4    |               prevalence in the lower educational groups.~ ~Moreover, the
 4    I,     2.  6    |       according to different national educational systems.~ ~Figure 2.4. Early
 5    I,     2.  7    |       structure of populations, their educational level and their lifestyles,
 6    I,     3.  1    |          especially important: if the educational levels had not risen, the
 7   II,     5.  1.  3|              adults and children. The educational aspect should constitute
 8   II,     5.  5.Int|                structural adjustment; Educational policy addresses mental
 9   II,     5.  5.  3|               objectives;~· integrate educational approach in a wide set of
10   II,     5.  5.  3|       intensive and highly structured educational program by the age of two
11   II,     5.  5.  3|     population. Epilepsy is linked to educational difficulties, unemployment,
12   II,     5.  5.  3|             experience some degree of educational difficulties (Anonymous,
13   II,     5.  5.  3|       condition should be part of the educational programs for teachers. Teachers
14   II,     5.  5.  3|                 With reference to the educational issues, children with epilepsy
15   II,     5.  5.  3|           workers is essential to the educational provision for children with
16   II,     5.  5.  3|              exchange information for educational, practical, and research
17   II,     5.  9.  3|              available medical tools (educational programs, environmental
18   II,     5. 11.  3|         countries to highly proactive educational campaigns aimed at primary
19   II,     6.  4.  5|          support, at Community level, educational campaigns directed at professionals (
20   II,     7.  4.  3|     enforcement, traffic engineering, educational measures, research. Community
21   II,     8.  1.  3|        reflected in the attainment of educational qualifications beyond compulsory
22   II,     8.  1.  3|       earnings reflect differences in educational and occupational achievements.~ ~
23   II,     8.  2.  1|               access basic health and educational services, and excluded from
24   II,     8.  2.  3|             acquisition, economic and educational disadvantage, social isolation
25   II,     9        |         population groups, defined by educational status or parental occupation
26   II,     9        |          related special needs in the educational and other settings if disability
27   II,     9        |              steadily with decreasing educational level. People with low levels
28   II,     9.  1.  2|           cost of medical, social and educational services to improve the
29   II,     9.  1.  2|          important medical, social or educational needs.~ ~Congenital heart
30   II,     9.  1.  2|         population groups, defined by educational status or parental occupation
31   II,     9.  2.  2|             challenge these patterns. Educational opportunity can be a prime
32   II,     9.  2.  3|               the number with special educational needs of any type (through
33   II,     9.  2.  3|       influenced by socio-economic or educational factors, where an individual
34   II,     9.  2.  4|          related special needs in the educational and other settings if disability
35   II,     9.  2.  5|              of paediatrics or of the educational curriculum required for
36   II,     9.  3.  1|           However, for socioeconomic, educational and empowerment reasons
37   II,     9.  3.  1|               function, social class, educational level, experience of physical
38   II,     9.  3.  1|              steadily with decreasing educational level. People with low levels
39   II,     9.  3.  3|        associated with reducing risk (educational level and source of information
40   II,     9.  3.  3|       cultural, social, religious and educational differences across countries,
41   II,     9.  4.  5|             community and to increase educational and social activity group
42   II,     9.  5.  1|          gender inequality in social, educational, cultural and economic status.
43   II,     9.  5.  3|              steadily with decreasing educational level (EP/EIWH, 2007).~ ~ ~
44   II,     9.  5.  3|             socio-economic status and educational level as well as gender
45  III,    10.  2.  1|        especially those with a higher educational level. Women reach their
46  III,    10.  2.  1|               restaurants, health and educational facilities, and public transport.~·
47  III,    10.  2.  1|               work places, health and educational facilities and public transport
48  III,    10.  2.  1|        Crialesi R, Grötvedt L (2000): Educational differences in smoking:
49  III,    10.  2.  1|     designated driver is available.~ ~Educational programmes and information
50  III,    10.  2.  1|             groups approach. It is an educational principle that in kindergartens
51  III,    10.  2.  1|         adolescent lifestyle predicts educational level. J Dent Res 2003;
52  III,    10.  2.  1|            degree of urbanisation and educational level of household head.
53  III,    10.  2.  1|          level, occupational level or educational attainment level has been
54  III,    10.  2.  4|          Arrays~UNESCO~United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural~ ~
55  III,    10.  3.  4|              and in groups with lower educational levels (+43% in Turin) .
56  III,    10.  5.  2|         Finally, there is evidence on educational differences, with rural
57  III,    10.  6.  1|               Gender, personality and educational level have been found to
58  III,    10.  6.  2|         require financial prosperity. Educational assets are significantly
59  III,    10.  6.  2|             mortality associated with educational class in men and women,
60  III,    10.  6.  2|           decline.~ ~Figure 10.6.2.1. Educational inequalities in mortality
61  III,    10.  6.  2|              among those with a lower educational level, occupational class
62  III,    10.  6.  2|               prevalence in the lower educational groups (Table 10.6.2.1).~ ~
63   IV,    11.  1.  1|       determinants such as social and educational policies, socio-economic
64   IV,    11.  1.  4|                Gulliford et al 2002). Educational attainment, awareness of
65   IV,    11.  1.  5|           disincentives) coupled with educational efforts may improve compliance.
66   IV,    11.  3.  1|           urban areas. Greece applies educational initiatives where the medical
67   IV,    11.  3.  1|            500 nurses per 100,000).~ ~Educational paths for medicine differ
68   IV,    11.  5.  6| transplantation~ – Organisational and educational aspects of organ transplantation~ –
69   IV,    12.  2    |     designated driver is available.~ ~Educational programmes and information
70   IV,    12.  3    |                school cooperation and educational systems and a green paper
71   IV,    12. 10    |              for Persons with Special Educational Needs Act 2004Sectoral
72   IV,    12. 10    |               solidarity and develops educational programs for the members
73   IV,    12. 10    |          including social, health and educational services) for all also in
74   IV,    13.  6.  1|            These losses of social and educational development are hard to
75   IV,    13.  6.  2|               facilities and relevant educational provision. However, apart