Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     3.  3    |       States. Compared to the 2005 values, all ratios will increase
 2   II,     4.  1    |      maximum, minimum and range of values estimated each year at MS
 3   II,     4.  1    |           1.4. Minimum and maximum values of life expectancy (LE)
 4   II,     4.  1    |       States in 2005. At MS level, values of life expectancy at birth
 5   II,     4.  1    |       women. The corresponding HLY values range respectively from
 6   II,     4.  1    |          at the age of 50, the HLY values range respectively from
 7   II,     4.  1    |      throughout all MS.~ ~Detailed values of life expectancy at birth (
 8   II,     4.  1    |           in their life expectancy values in the aftermath of the
 9   II,     4.  1    |            converge towards higher values. These are high convergence
10   II,     4.  1    |        years from the highest EU27 values. These are low convergence
11   II,     4.  1    |          trend of the highest EU27 values. These are divergent countries.
12   II,     4.  1    |          trend of the highest EU27 values from the 1960s onwards.
13   II,     4.  1    |           Table 4.1.7 presents the values of life expectancy at birth
14   II,     5.  2.  4|        Table 5.2.8. Estimated mean values of total cholesterol in
15   II,     5.  2.  4|    Prevalence of smoking (%), mean values of systolic blood pressure (
16   II,     5.  2.  6|         The association extends to values of plasma cholesterol well
17   II,     5.  2.  6|       associated to blood pressure values around 130-139/85-89, largely
18   II,     5.  2.  6|       associated to blood pressure values <120/80 mmHg (Vasan R et
19   II,     5.  4.  1|     normalisation of blood glucose values as well as lipid levels
20   II,     5.  4.  2|         over 75 years of age, with values all over 100/1000 for EUCID
21   II,     5.  4.  3|            of diabetesStandardized values reported by EUCID range
22   II,     5.  4.  3|           12%) showing the highest values. According to the above
23   II,     5.  4.  3|          11 EUCID countries report values between 10% for Ireland
24   II,     5.  4.  3|       percentages above 80%. These values were lower in young people
25   II,     5.  4.  3|            of 7 countries reported values above 90%. There is no clear
26   II,     5.  5.  3|           some extremely different values for certain countries, which
27   II,     5.  5.  3|          age group has the highest values of schizophrenia-associated
28   II,     5.  6.  3|           brought to the following values:~ ~Osteoporosis: a BMD value
29   II,     5.  8.  3|           Forlì and Vilnius), with values ranging from about 4% in
30   II,     5. 11.  3|  populations of similar ages yield values approximately half of those
31   II,     5. 12.  3|             in 2000-02 the highest values for women were 53.9/100,
32   II,     5. 12.  3|  substantial variation in absolute values across countries, a limited
33   II,     7.  3.  3|          EU27: Minimum and maximum values per country~ ~Accident and
34   II,     9.  3.  3|     according to their lifestyles, values, and risk status are an
35  III,    10.  2.  1|            based on the percentile values of BMI adjusted for age
36  III,    10.  2.  1|           and 400 µg by the D-A-CH values of the German speaking countries.
37  III,    10.  2.  1|         Depending on the reference values used, intakes in Europe
38  III,    10.  2.  1|          DAFNE average consumption values per broad food categories (
39  III,    10.  2.  1|         mass index: comparing mean values and prevalence rates from
40  III,    10.  2.  1|   Nutrition Association. Reference values for nutrient intake of the
41  III,    10.  2.  2|         The association extends to values of plasma cholesterol well
42  III,    10.  2.  3|       associated to blood pressure values around 130-139/85-89, quite
43  III,    10.  2.  3|       associated to blood pressure values <120/80 mmHg. Even an isolated
44  III,    10.  3.  1|            does not give any limit values.~ ~
45  III,    10.  3.  1| establishing radon maps, reference values for dwellings and assessment
46  III,    10.  4.  1|        European guidelines, target values and limit values (Table
47  III,    10.  4.  1|            target values and limit values (Table 10.4.1.1).~ ~Table
48  III,    10.  4.  1|            1.1. Guidelines, target values and limit values.~ ~Long-term
49  III,    10.  4.  1|            target values and limit values.~ ~Long-term average exposure
50  III,    10.  4.  1|    directives set limit and target values for the listed pollutants (
51  III,    10.  4.  1|       aimed at attaining the limit values within the set time frame.
52  III,    10.  4.  1|       establishing limit or target values and alert thresholds for
53  III,    10.  4.  1|         meeting the relevant limit values for PM10 , as this could
54  III,    10.  4.  1|         local hotspots where limit values are exceeded, such as areas
55  III,    10.  4.  2|      intake is below the reference values. Available experimental
56  III,    10.  4.  2|        2002 review and derived ADI values for nitrate (0-3.7 mg/kg
57  III,    10.  4.  2|            toxicological reference values. – Article 41;~· annual
58  III,    10.  4.  3|          water uses, functions and values.~ ~Focusing on water contaminating
59  III,    10.  4.  3|            Directive specifies the values for certain parameters which
60  III,    10.  4.  3|            define additional limit values on a national basis. For
61  III,    10.  4.  3|             In general, safe limit values are well established. These
62  III,    10.  4.  5|         litter, effect on property values, stress for lack of regulatory
63  III,    10.  6.  1|                 10.6.2.5 The World Values Survey~The World Values
64  III,    10.  6.  1|            Values Survey~The World Values Survey, which has been performed
65  III,    10.  6.  2|          and well-being are shared values across societal sectors.
66   IV,    11.  1.  5|            aligned to professional values; they should be focused
67   IV,    11.  5.  4|    countries depending on cultural values.~In 2006, 56% of Europeans
68   IV,    11.  6.  3|        explicit calculation of the values for each country (Wagstaff,
69   IV,    12. 10    |            2 October 2003 on limit values, measurement methods, labelling,
70   IV,    12. 10    |            subject to strict limit values so as to minimise health
71   IV,    12. 10    |         Act, BImSchG, htt ). Limit values for the exposure to environmental
72   IV,    13.  2.  2|            1529 has the highest values of schizophrenia-associated
73   IV,    13.  5    |       themselves to promote shared values of solidarity, equity and
74   IV,    13.  8    |          goals: they are driven by values rather than profit, they