Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  1.  1|           factors: chemicals in the brain that control hunger, appetite,
 2   II,     5.  5    |                     5.5. Mental and brain diseases and disorders~ ~
 3   II,     5.  5.Int|          attributable to mental and brain disorders will rise to 15%13.
 4   II,     5.  5.  2|           describe various kinds of brain disorders which all involve
 5   II,     5.  5.  2|     progressive damage and death of brain cells. It is not actually
 6   II,     5.  5.  2|      structure and chemistry of the brain gradually becomes severely
 7   II,     5.  5.  2|      post-mortem examination of the brain. The statistics presented
 8   II,     5.  5.  2|             for you – good for your brain: the evidence on risk reduction
 9   II,     5.  5.  2|          Can dementia be prevented? Brain aging in a population-based
10   II,     5.  5.  3|           Degeneration~EBC~European Brain Council~GP~General practitioner~
11   II,     5.  5.  3|           factors: chemicals in the brain that control hunger, appetite,
12   II,     5.  5.  3|      functional disturbances of the brain. Therefore, and due to the
13   II,     5.  5.  3|         available. Yet the European Brain Council has evaluated the
14   II,     5.  5.  3|          has evaluated the costs of brain disorders in Europe by an
15   II,     5.  5.  3|          Direct healthcare costs by brain disorder~The most comprehensive
16   II,     5.  5.  3|             evaluation of costs for brain disorders was performed
17   II,     5.  5.  3|           performed by the European Brain Council (Figure 5.5.3.3.
18   II,     5.  5.  3|            Cost of disorders of the brain in Europe. Eur J Neurol
19   II,     5.  5.  3|             They also have abnormal brain wave patterns which can
20   II,     5.  5.  3|         from a number of disordered brain functions. The cardinal
21   II,     5.  5.  3|    recurrent paroxysmal episodes of brain dysfunction characterized
22   II,     5.  5.  3|           occur in the context of a brain insult (systemic, toxic
23   II,     5.  5.  3|           CNS abnormalities such as brain tumours, genetic, metabolic
24   II,     5.  5.  3|           to those aged 65 or more. Brain tumors, cerebrovascular
25   II,     5.  5.  3|      epilepsy in Kaunas, Lithuania. Brain Dev 19:379-387.~Eriksson
26   II,     5.  5.  3|            with multiple sclerosis. Brain 127:844-850.~Brønnum-Hansen
27   II,     5.  5.  3|      sclerosis: an amnesic process. Brain 126:770782.~Dahl OP, Aarseth
28   II,     5.  5.  3|      heterogeneity on pathogenesis. Brain Pathol 6:259-274.~Mc Donald
29   II,     5.  5.  3|      degeneration of neurons in the brain area substantial nigra pars
30   II,     5.  5.  3|             calculate the burden of brain disorders estimated the
31   II,     5.  5.  3|            promoted by the European Brain Council (ECB), estimated
32   II,     5.  5.  3|              estimated the costs of brain disorders in the different
33   II,     5.  5.  3|      demonstrate that the costs for brain disorders are generally
34   II,     5.  5.  3|      Consortium, 2004)~The European Brain Council (EBC) has launched
35   II,     5.  5.  3| understanding but also awareness of brain disorders in Europe (htt ).
36   II,     5.  5.  3|       health economic evaluation of brain disorders in Europe (Andlin-Sobocki
37   II,     5.  5.  3|            Cost of disorders of the brain in Europe. Eur J Neurol
38   II,     5.  5.  3|            A community-based study. Brain 123:2297-2305.~Singer E (
39   II,     5.  5.  3|             Acronyms~ ~EBC~European Brain Council~GP~General practitioner~
40   II,     8.  2.  1|            by injury, disease, or a brain abnormality. These causes
41   II,     8.  2.  1|             defects that affect the brain (such as hydrocephalus or
42   II,     8.  2.  1|            prevent certain kinds of brain abnormalities. Advances
43   II,     9.  1.  1|             the developing/immature brain (DMCN, 2000).~ ~Challenges
44   II,     9.  1.  2|             trimester of pregnancy (brain development continues later),
45   II,     9.  3.  1|               response to toxins;~· brain organisation; and~· the
46   II,     9.  3.  1|            for prostate problems.~ ~Brain function, mental health,
47   II,     9.  3.  1|           time of menopause. In the brain and eye, as in other target
48   II,     9.  3.  1|         that sex hormones influence brain function throughout life,
49  III,    10.  2.  1|        Childen~Adults~Larinx~Stroke~Brain tumors*~Stroke*~Oropharinx~
50  III,    10.  2.  1|       bloodstream and enters in the brain. Immediately after exposure
51  III,    10.  2.  1|          has several effects on the brain. The activation of reward
52  III,    10.  2.  1|             of reward pathways, the brain circuitry that regulates
53  III,    10.  2.  1|           and a decreased volume of brain grey matter.~ ~Long term
54  III,    10.  2.  1|           and selenoproteins in the brain and brain diseases. J Neurochem.
55  III,    10.  2.  1|     selenoproteins in the brain and brain diseases. J Neurochem. 86:
56  III,    10.  2.  5|      Indredavik et al, 2007).~Human brain development is vulnerable.
57  III,    10.  2.  5|            Black 1998). Even though brain continues maturation till
58  III,    10.  2.  5|         development of the infant's brain and even formation of permanent
59  III,    10.  2.  5|         fetal development can cause brain injury at doses much lower
60  III,    10.  2.  5|          than those affecting adult brain function. Recognition of
61  III,    10.  2.  5|             in the developing human brain are not known and they are
62  III,    10.  2.  5|              How a child builds its brain: Some lessons from animal
63  III,    10.  3.  1|      neurodegenerative diseases and brain tumours, the link to ELF
64  III,    10.  3.  1|          pose any increased risk of brain tumour or acoustic neuroma.
65  III,    10.  3.  1|            is no increased risk for brain tumours in long-term users,
66  III,    10.  3.  2|        foetal development can cause brain injury at doses much lower
67  III,    10.  3.  2|          than those affecting adult brain function. Recognition of
68  III,    10.  3.  2|             in the developing human brain are not known and they are
69  III,    10.  3.  3|             mainly localized in the brain and other parts of the nervous
70  III,    10.  5.  3|           Costs of disorders of the brain in Europe. European Journal
71   IV,    11.  3.  1|     Migration Outlook examined the “brain drain” of doctors from lower-income
72   IV,    13.  7.  3|             medicine, virology, and brain & behaviour, significant
73   IV,    13.  9    |            Cost of disorders of the brain in Europe. Eur J Neurol
74  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|            botulinum~botulism~bowel~brain~breast~breast-fed~breastfeeding~