Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.  7    |              the total amount of CO2 emissions. But the growing economic,
 2    I,     2.  8    |             resulting greenhouse gas emissions have been increasing in
 3    I,     2.  8    |         large reductions in some air emissions in parts of Europe, the
 4    I,     2.  8    |         pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Increasing investments
 5    I,     2.  8    |    Geothermal~No significant harmful emissions~Negligible~Minimal~Hydroelectric~ ~
 6    I,     2.  8    |               No significant harmful emissions, but can lead to risks through
 7    I,     2.  8    |           for coal; higher pollutant emissions and hence probably greater
 8    I,     2.  8    |        Comparatively high greenhouse emissions versus coal~Usually small
 9    I,     2.  8    |               No significant harmful emissions~ ~Negligible~ ~Negligible~ ~
10    I,     2.  8    |              of control of pollutant emissions, workers protection legislation
11  III,    10.  3.  1|              maps will capture noise emissions from industry and transport,
12  III,    10.  3.  1|              maps will capture noise emissions from industry and transport,
13  III,    10.  3.  2|           higher than the costs.~ ~ ~Emissions and release of chemicals
14  III,    10.  3.  2|              construction materials, emissions related to the waste life
15  III,    10.  3.  2|         information about industrial emissions in the EU has been available
16  III,    10.  3.  2|         first register of industrial emissions into air and water, and
17  III,    10.  3.  2|             to information on annual emissions from about 12 000 industrial
18  III,    10.  3.  2|             trend can be observed in emissions of certain pollutants e.g.
19  III,    10.  3.  2|        health and the environment.~ ~Emissions of hazardous chemicals from
20  III,    10.  3.  2| participation. Details of industrial emissions have to be reported to the
21  III,    10.  3.  4|           Events Data Base~EU ETS~EU emissions trading scheme~EU ETS~EU
22  III,    10.  3.  4|             trading scheme~EU ETS~EU emissions trading scheme~GHG~Greenhouse
23  III,    10.  3.  4|              rising greenhouse gases emissions over the last 50 years.
24  III,    10.  3.  4|            that greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will only be 0.6% below
25  III,    10.  3.  4|           include aviation in the EU emissions trading scheme (EU ETS)
26  III,    10.  3.  4|           forward a communication on emissions from cars, a proposal on
27  III,    10.  3.  4|            Climate actions to reduce emissions and reverse deforestation,
28  III,    10.  4.  1|       quality improves.~ ~In Europe, emissions of air pollutants are projected
29  III,    10.  4.  1|        significant reductions in the emissions of some common pollutants,
30  III,    10.  4.  1|             a continuous decrease in emissions of air pollutants since
31  III,    10.  4.  1|           air pollutants since 2000. Emissions in South-Eastern Europe
32  III,    10.  4.  1|              led to increases in the emissions of most air pollutants,
33  III,    10.  4.  1|              concern are, therefore, emissions of particulates and particulate
34  III,    10.  4.  1|          particulate precursors, and emissions of the precursors of ground-level
35  III,    10.  4.  1|               A new policy to reduce emissions of acid gases, ammonia and
36  III,    10.  4.  1|            resulted in lower traffic emissions and less hospital admissions
37  III,    10.  4.  1|              problems of exposure to emissions from moisture and mould
38  III,    10.  4.  1|      combination with tobacco smoke, emissions from gas stoves, mites and
39  III,    10.  4.  1|            pollutants addressed were Emissions of fine particles (PM2.5 ),
40  III,    10.  4.  1|       requirements for maximum total emissions of sulphur dioxide, nitrogen
41  III,    10.  4.  1|             the further reduction of emissions, for example through improving
42  III,    10.  4.  1|             improvements via reduced emissions of air pollutants.~ ~In
43  III,    10.  4.  1|           specific actions to reduce emissions need to be taken by other
44  III,    10.  4.  2|           strict~standards governing~emissions from waste~incineration;
45  III,    10.  4.  2|      numerous measures to reduce the emissions of dioxins and PCB have
46  III,    10.  4.  2|              2010 a 95% reduction in emissions and content in products
47  III,    10.  4.  2|           preparation)~· Fate: GD on emissions from greenhouse, protected
48  III,    10.  4.  2|             protected crop systems~- emissions from these systems to relevant
49  III,    10.  4.  3|            sewage plants, leading to emissions into the environment of
50  III,    10.  4.  5|              60s with a reduction of emissions. Further insights on possible
51  III,    10.  4.  5|          general with a reduction of emissions to the nearby communities.
52  III,    10.  4.  5|            mitigation of exposure to emissions and leachates of existing
53  III,    10.  4.  5|              technology for lowering emissions.~The decision-making process
54  III,    10.  5.  1|             household and industrial emissions and urban pests. Sealed
55  III,    10.  5.  1|             as it accumulates indoor emissions (Eme s, 1998).~ ~Outdoor
56  III,    10.  5.  1|             human settlement lead to emissions. However, another indication
57  III,    10.  5.  1|             Household and industrial emissions and waste~ ~In addition
58  III,    10.  5.  1|      combustion in households. These emissions can affect large parts of
59   IV,    12. 10    |            ambient air quality. Some emissions of construction materials
60   IV,    12. 10    |           are regulated. However the emissions of many products are not
61   IV,    12. 10    |           restricted up to now. Some emissions of industrial plants are
62   IV,    12. 10    |            air quality mainly affect emissions of particulate matter and
63   IV,    12. 10    |      stringently regulated. The main emissions sources for adverse by-products,
64   IV,    12. 10    |         Standards Regulations 2002~- Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds
65   IV,    12. 10    |       European Communities (National Emissions Ceilings) Regulations, 2004.~-
66   IV,    12. 10    |          Regs, 2006.~- Limitation of Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds
67   IV,    12. 10    |              Communities (control of emissions of Gaseous and Particulate
68   IV,    12. 10    |             Law 3010/2002 concerning emissions by industries, in compliance
69   IV,    12. 10    |    practicable, measures that reduce emissions to air, land and water from
70   IV,    12. 10    |      Moreover, every day a Report of Emissions (O3 , NO2 , SO2 , CO, PM-10,
71   IV,    13.  7.  4|       contributing to carbon dioxide emissions and, therefore, not receiving
72  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|            embryo~emedicine~emission~emissions~emotional~emphysema~employment~