Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  1.  1|         diseases and disorders~ ~· Mood/anxiety disorders and suicide~The
 2   II,     5.  1.  1|            control in life, depression, anxiety, anger, or loneliness.~Interpersonal
 3   II,     5.  5.Int|                 result in high rates of anxiety and depression, symptoms
 4   II,     5.  5.Int|                 of social isolation and anxiety are female lone parents
 5   II,     5.  5.Int|                ill health in the EU are anxiety disorders and depression.
 6   II,     5.  5.Int|               of helplessness, sadness, anxiety and the need to be perfect.
 7   II,     5.  5.  1|                 5.5.1. Depression, mood/anxiety disorders and suicides~ ~
 8   II,     5.  5.  1|                mental disorders such as anxiety disorders (Kessler et al
 9   II,     5.  5.  1|      professionals (Lecrubier, 2008).~ ~Anxiety disorders. There are four
10   II,     5.  5.  1|                 There are four types of anxiety disorders: Obsessive-compulsive
11   II,     5.  5.  1|  Obsessive-compulsive disorders, phobic anxiety disorders, other anxiety
12   II,     5.  5.  1|                anxiety disorders, other anxiety disorders (e.g. panic disorder
13   II,     5.  5.  1|                disorder and generalised anxiety disorder), and reaction
14   II,     5.  5.  1|         including adjustment disorders. Anxiety disorders are often co-morbid
15   II,     5.  5.  1|              often co-morbid with other anxiety disorders or mood disorders (
16   II,     5.  5.  1|              disorders (Kessler, 2007). Anxiety disorders are common; a
17   II,     5.  5.  1|                prevalence of having any anxiety disorder to vary between
18   II,     5.  5.  1|                al., 2007). The onset of anxiety symptoms is often in childhood
19   II,     5.  5.  1|                or adolescence, but some anxiety disorders have a later onset
20   II,     5.  5.  1|                  Kessler et al., 2007). Anxiety disorders are often chronic,
21   II,     5.  5.  1|            support increase the risk of anxiety disorders (Fryers, 2007).~ ~
22   II,     5.  5.  1|             disorders (Fryers, 2007).~ ~Anxiety disorders cause substantial
23   II,     5.  5.  1|                 person in four with any anxiety disorder has been reported
24   II,     5.  5.  1|               association with mood and anxiety disorders is robust. Psychological
25   II,     5.  5.  1|               symptoms of depression or anxiety, which do not fulfil the
26   II,     5.  5.  1|             Those relevant for mood and anxiety disorders and suicides are
27   II,     5.  5.  1|               Section 5.5.1.~ ~Mood and anxiety disorders. There are no
28   II,     5.  5.  1|               in HfA addressing mood or anxiety disorders only. HfA includes
29   II,     5.  5.  1|                data concerning mood and anxiety disorders cannot be derived
30   II,     5.  5.  1|                include data on mood and anxiety disorders, substance use
31   II,     5.  5.  1|           population surveys~ ~Mood and anxiety disorders.~ESEMeD and the
32   II,     5.  5.  1|              work days lost in mood and anxiety disorders~ ~The ESEMeD study
33   II,     5.  5.  1|              Lifetime prevalence of any anxiety disorder was 14%. Table
34   II,     5.  5.  1|       prevalence rates (%) for mood and anxiety disorders as the total in
35   II,     5.  5.  1|            month prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders in the six ESEMeD
36   II,     5.  5.  1|                fourth of those with any anxiety disorder had contacted a
37   II,     5.  5.  1|            among those with any mood or anxiety disorder or no mental disorder
38   II,     5.  5.  1|                 months, ESEMeD Study.~ ~Anxiety and mood disorders were
39   II,     5.  5.  1|              suffering from mood and/or anxiety disorders had had suicidal
40   II,     5.  5.  1|                those with a generalised anxiety disorder.~ ~Table 5.5.1.
41   II,     5.  5.  1|              behaviour in some mood and anxiety disorders in the six ESEMeD
42   II,     5.  5.  1|               all relevant for mood and anxiety disorders and suicides.
43   II,     5.  5.  1|            areas of action for mood and anxiety disorders and suicides.
44   II,     5.  5.  1|              and prevention of mood and anxiety disorders and suicides (
45   II,     5.  5.  1|              Strategies for Coping with Anxiety, Depression and Stress Related
46   II,     5.  5.  1|               and prevention of stress, anxiety, depression and suicide
47   II,     5.  5.  1| under-recognition and undertreatment of anxiety and mood disorders: results
48   II,     5.  5.  3|            control in life, depression, anxiety, anger, or loneliness;~·
49   II,     5.  6.  3|             occurrence of back pain are anxiety, depression, emotional instability
50   II,     5.  8.  3|                symptoms of depression / anxiety are reported with prevalence
51   II,     5.  8.  7|            Pisinger C, Stage KB (2004): Anxiety and depression in patients
52   II,     5. 10.  4|               consumption and show high anxiety about severe reactions,
53   II,     7.  4.  6|                 and other drug use, and anxiety disorders;~· biological
54   II,     9.  3.  1|                 rates of depression and anxiety, symptoms of post-traumatic
55   II,     9.  3.  1|                 of social isolation and anxiety are female lone parents
56   II,     9.  3.  2|               higher levels of parental anxiety, unnecessary medical interventions
57   II,     9.  5.  3|                Adulthood~Depression and anxiety~Females > Males~Schizophrenia~
58   II,     9.  5.  3|                lack of confidence cause anxiety and lack of interest and
59  III,    10.  1.  1|                 as well as reduction of anxiety, stress, and worries (Bondy,
60  III,    10.  1.  1|        disorders (social phobia, social anxiety) and suicidal behaviour (
61  III,    10.  1.  3|              Stephens RS (1999): Social anxiety and drinking in college
62  III,    10.  1.  3|                alcohol problems and the anxiety disorders. Am J Psychiatry
63  III,    10.  2.  1|              symptoms of depression and anxiety, with an increasing prevalence
64  III,    10.  2.  1|               and, possibly, stress and anxiety. Moreover, regular physical activity
65  III,    10.  3.  4|            including increased rates of anxiety and depression stemming
66  III,    10.  3.  4|               as increased incidence of anxiety and depression, stem from
67   IV,    12. 10    |             other personal problems and anxiety manifestations (e.g. under-achievement,
68   IV,    13.  6.  1|                and pain on the child;~· Anxiety, stress, and possibly loss
69   IV,    13.  6.  2|                 cases of mental health, anxiety or depression, a school
70  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|             antimicrobials~antioxidants~anxiety~aortic~apnoea~appropriateness~