Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    -,     1        |           key indicators and data coverage inevitably vary across countries,
 2    I,     2.  4    |      steps to increase population coverage, address financial barriers
 3    I,     2.  5    |       schemes and on their actual coverage. While fuller and more productive
 4    I,     2.  5    |        seem necessary to increase coverage currently at 50-60% on average
 5   II,     5.  1.  2|          hospital care, financial coverage through medical insurances,
 6   II,     5.  3.  2|      national cancer registration coverage, while in other countries
 7   II,     5.  3.  2|           countries with regional coverage, statistical techniques
 8   II,     5.  3.  2|      national cancer registration coverage (see above). Yet in several
 9   II,     5.  3.  3|       registry database with 100% coverage). The estimates do not reflect
10   II,     5.  4.  2|       individual measurements and coverage of the target population.
11   II,     5.  5.  1|           coding of diagnoses and coverage of hospitalisation data
12   II,     5.  5.  3|      Compilation, publication and coverage across Europe is however
13   II,     5.  5.  3|      degree of case ascertainment coverage based on geographic and
14   II,     5.  7.  2|     patient starting RRT in their coverage area together with information
15   II,     5.  7.  2|           the completeness of the coverage of their countries, data
16   II,     5.  7.  2|         period or with incomplete coverage of their country. Nine additional
17   II,     5. 10.  2|     redundancy and relatively low coverage of allergens by individual
18   II,     5. 14.  3|       even if they have insurance coverage or qualify for the oral
19   II,     5. 14.  7|          likely to receive health coverage but also less likely to
20   II,     6.  3.  2|     surveillance networks, whilst coverage across and within countries
21   II,     6.  3.  3|       adequate performance of and coverage with antenatal care services
22   II,     6.  3.  4|        There is a WHO vaccination coverage target, accepted by all
23   II,     6.  3.  4|           routinely monitor their coverage even for the elderly, and
24   II,     6.  3.  4|           an improved vaccination coverage in these selected groups,
25   II,     6.  3.  5|       years), even though vaccine coverage is not uniform, with Germany
26   II,     6.  3.  5|       maintained high vaccination coverage and even increased it, there
27   II,     6.  3.  5|       previously attained vaccine coverage levels. Political and socioeconomic
28   II,     6.  3.  5|          uptake.~High vaccination coverage does not exhibit a direct
29   II,     6.  3.  5|          over 95% measles vaccine coverage; most of these are in the
30   II,     6.  3.  5|            Measles (MCV1) vaccine coverage.~ ~
31   II,     6.  3.  5|          variation in the vaccine coverage by sex (some vaccination
32   II,     9.  1.  2|     births per year. Annual birth coverage is 23.4% of births of the
33   II,     9.  1.  2|          2009.~ ~Table 9.1.2.2.1. Coverage of the European Population
34   II,     9.  1.  2|       Hungary). Although complete coverage of the European population
35   II,     9.  2.  3|          stable, high vaccination coverage, disease has declined, with
36   II,     9.  2.  6|    negatives. This will encourage coverage of positive mental health
37  III,    10.  2.  1|          national and subnational coverage, 2004-2005, all injecting
38  III,    10.  2.  1|        where an estimation of the coverage of substitution treatment
39  III,    10.  2.  1|         with different degrees of coverage of the region. In the following,
40  III,    10.  4.  3|     WHO-European Region show that coverage in rural areas often lags
41  III,    10.  4.  3|       Southern European countries coverage ranged between 40% and 60%,
42  III,    10.  4.  3|       there was a 70% increase in coverage from 1980 to 2003, with
43  III,    10.  6.  2|       made to increase population coverage, address financial barriers
44   IV,    11.  1.  3|        generosity and equality of coverage to cost containment and
45   IV,    11.  1.  4| precondition of access to care is coverage by health insurance. Universal,
46   IV,    11.  1.  4|     Universal, or near universal, coverage of the population by the
47   IV,    11.  1.  4|          even when near universal coverage is achieved, there still
48   IV,    11.  1.  4|           without this additional coverage (Mossialos and Thomson 2004;
49   IV,    11.  1.  4|        people may be unaware that coverage by the public system relates
50   IV,    11.  1.  4|          countries with universal coverage and largely publicly funded
51   IV,    11.  6    |         are pooled, the levels of coverage (including cost sharing),
52   IV,    11.  6.  2|   countries now provide universal coverage, though the scope (what
53   IV,    11.  6.  2|         level of cost sharing) of coverage varies across Europe, with
54   IV,    11.  6.  2|       universal) statutory health coverage. The most common contribution
55   IV,    11.  6.  2|          where there is extensive coverage of co-payments (complementary
56   IV,    11.  6.  2|      despite some hopes that such coverage would develop as a supplementary
57   IV,    11.  6.  3|     recent extension of insurance coverage for the costs of user charges
58   IV,    11.  6.  4|           trend towards extending coverage to health services to the
59   IV,    11.  6.  4|           attainment of universal coverage is fairly recent and represents
60   IV,    11.  6.  4|           represents a shift from coverage being defined on the basis
61   IV,    11.  6.  4|       payment of contributions to coverage based on residence: Belgium
62   IV,    11.  6.  4|       countries, which has eroded coverage to some extent. Note that
63   IV,    11.  6.  4|       Note that data on universal coverage may be misleading, in particular
64   IV,    11.  6.  4|        countries, while universal coverage of the population has been
65   IV,    11.  6.  4|     existing (perceived) demands. Coverage of a population for health
66   IV,    11.  6.  4|         health insurance systems, coverage through many national health
67   IV,    12.  3    |       travelling, social security coverage abroad, more equal treatment
68   IV,    13.  5    |      steps to increase population coverage, address financial barriers
69   IV,    13.  5    |         national health insurance coverage. Prior authorisation can