Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     6.  3.  4|           through the ingestion of contaminated milk or through laboratory
 2   II,     6.  3.  5|       Tetanus is mostly seen after contaminated injuries, and the infection
 3   II,     6.  3.  6|          to the situation that one contaminated part of food can affect
 4   II,     6.  3.  6|     transmission is consumption of contaminated food (mainly chicken) or
 5   II,     6.  3.  6| transmission is the consumption of contaminated food. After a peak in 1995,
 6   II,     6.  3.  6| transmission is the consumption of contaminated food and water. Preventive
 7   II,     6.  3.  6|           person or indirectly via contaminated food or water. General hygiene
 8   II,     6.  3.  6| transmission is the consumption of contaminated food (especially beef and
 9   II,     6.  3.  6|  especially beef and raw milk), or contaminated water. Direct contact with
10   II,     6.  3.  6|           and swimming outdoors in contaminated surface waters have been
11   II,     6.  3.  6|           often acquired by eating contaminated, particularly raw or undercooked,
12   II,     6.  3.  6|         faeces, and consumption of contaminated food is the principal route
13   II,     6.  3.  6|         survive for a long time in contaminated coastal waters, transmitting
14   II,     6.  3.  6|            or through ingestion of contaminated food, though recently sexual
15   II,     6.  3.  6|           from inadequately washed contaminated fruits or vegetables, but
16   II,     6.  3.  6|           the major reservoirs are contaminated surface waters and humans.
17   II,     6.  3.  6|          occurs after ingestion of contaminated food or water, and several
18   II,     6.  3.  6|         swimming pools and through contaminated drinking water. Cryptosporidiosis
19   II,     6.  3.  7|            of water, food, or soil contaminated by rodents; 3) handling
20   II,     6.  3.  7|           of the virus in aerosols contaminated with the excreta of infected
21   II,     6.  3.  7|       animals, or from the dust of contaminated premises. European-level
22   II,     6.  3.  7|             soil or other material contaminated with the urine of infected
23   II,     6.  3.  7|         infected animal’s urine or contaminated fresh water.~ ~The overall
24   II,     6.  3.  7|    decontamination and disposal of contaminated materials and the environment.
25  III,    10.  1    |      Factors~Chemical~Ingestion of contaminated food and drinking water~
26  III,    10.  3.  2|            terms of remediation of contaminated sites and health impacts —
27  III,    10.  3.  2|         poorly managed industries, contaminated sites, and accidents) as
28  III,    10.  3.  2|           such as poor sanitation, contaminated food and infectious diseases,
29  III,    10.  3.  2|       trans-boundary pollution and contaminated products.~ ~Figure 10.3.
30  III,    10.  3.  3|    frequently through ingestion of contaminated milk or through laboratory
31  III,    10.  3.  3|           through the ingestion of contaminated foodstuff. In humans, the
32  III,    10.  3.  4|           families was flooded and contaminated by septic pits. The resulting
33  III,    10.  3.  4|         private homes were largely contaminated by sewage water. The local
34  III,    10.  4.  2|            products that have been contaminated by one or other of the previously
35  III,    10.  4.  2|            or through ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs or water). Salmonella
36  III,    10.  4.  2|          in 2005)~Poultry meat and contaminated drinking water~Salmonellosis~
37  III,    10.  4.  2|       Growing~Fruit and vegetables~Contaminated drinking water~Trichinellosis
38  III,    10.  4.  2|      transmitted to humans through contaminated food. Community legislation
39  III,    10.  4.  2|           through the ingestion of contaminated foodstuff. In humans, the
40  III,    10.  4.  2|           outbreaks were caused by contaminated drinking water. Caliciviruses
41  III,    10.  4.  2|           in order to cease highly contaminated specimens from the market.
42  III,    10.  4.  3|       third source is ground water contaminated either by naturally occurring
43  III,    10.  4.  3|            waters are occasionally contaminated by natural contaminants
44  III,    10.  4.  5|      ingested, for example through contaminated shellfish (paralytic shellfish
45  III,    10.  4.  5|           2.1; EEA, 2007a).~ ~Soil contaminated with hazardous substances
46  III,    10.  4.  5|          sources that flow through contaminated areas, through the food
47  III,    10.  4.  5|           even by the ingestion of contaminated soil by children in playgrounds (
48  III,    10.  4.  5|         hazardous waste streams.~ ~Contaminated soils can be a legacy stretching
49  III,    10.  4.  5|         over 1 800 000 potentially contaminated sites, of which 250 000
50  III,    10.  4.  5|        inventories or registers of contaminated sites and are making progress
51  III,    10.  4.  5|          Progress in management of contaminated sites” (EEA, 2007a) and
52  III,    10.  4.  5|         data and assessments about contaminated sites are available on http ~ ~
53  III,    10.  4.  5|      progress in the management of contaminated sites in Europe~ ~Figure
54  III,    10.  4.  5|          nearly 250 000 sites) are contaminated and need to be remediated.
55  III,    10.  4.  5|   expenditure on the management of contaminated sites is on average about
56  III,    10.  4.  5|     principle to the management of contaminated sites, large sums of public
57  III,    10.  4.  5|         combustion, consumption of contaminated food and water, or contact
58  III,    10.  4.  5|         and water, or contact with contaminated soil. While some studies
59  III,    10.  4.  5|      historical contamination.~ ~ ~Contaminated sites management~ ~At national
60  III,    10.  4.  5|        inventories or registers of contaminated sites represent an important
61  III,    10.  4.  5|         reasons, the management of contaminated sites follows a tiered approach
62  III,    10.  4.  5|      progress in the management of contaminated sites varies significantly
63  III,    10.  4.  5|           confirmed as potentially contaminated and need to be submitted
64  III,    10.  4.  5|    remediation schemes of existing contaminated sites, priorities should
65  III,    10.  4.  5|          Progress in management of contaminated sites”. Available at:~htt ~ ~
66  III,    10.  5.  1|    inhalation of droplets of water contaminated with Legionella Pneumophila (
67  III,    10.  5.  1|           related to the intake of contaminated food (Milstead et al, 2006),
68  III,    10.  5.  1|    countries know the challenge of contaminated drinking water and water-related
69  III,    10.  5.  1|        these areas are affected by contaminated soil (brownfields) in which