Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  5.  2|      disturbances such as epileptic seizures, gait disturbances and difficulties
 2   II,     5.  5.  3|           several causes, including seizures, accidents and respiratory
 3   II,     5.  5.  3|          epilepsy are the epileptic seizures, which are recurrent paroxysmal
 4   II,     5.  5.  3|            with epilepsy experience seizures, not all individuals with
 5   II,     5.  5.  3|            not all individuals with seizures have epilepsy. Epileptic
 6   II,     5.  5.  3|            have epilepsy. Epileptic seizures may occur in the context
 7   II,     5.  5.  3|       provoked or acute symptomatic seizures) are simply an acute manifestation
 8   II,     5.  5.  3|           defined by the absence of seizures for at least five years
 9   II,     5.  5.  3|           of two or more unprovoked seizures (Commission, 1993). An unprovoked
10   II,     5.  5.  3|            a seizure or a flurry of seizures occurring within 24 hours
11   II,     5.  5.  3|   precipitating factors. Unprovoked seizures include events occurring
12   II,     5.  5.  3|          idiopathic and cryptogenic seizures), in patients with previous
13   II,     5.  5.  3|         insults (remote symptomatic seizures), or in those with progressive
14   II,     5.  5.  3|             progressive symptomatic seizures). Unprovoked seizures may
15   II,     5.  5.  3|   symptomatic seizures). Unprovoked seizures may be single or recurrent.
16   II,     5.  5.  3|     patients with single unprovoked seizures may have “potentialepilepsy,
17   II,     5.  5.  3|             provoked and unprovoked seizures and between isolated and
18   II,     5.  5.  3|      between isolated and recurrent seizures is relevant to the interpretation
19   II,     5.  5.  3| antiepileptic drugs and one or more seizures a month over 18 months or
20   II,     5.  5.  3|            and social impact of the seizures, and on the capabilities
21   II,     5.  5.  3|           Incidence of epilepsy and seizures~Thirteen incidence studies
22   II,     5.  5.  3|         incidence of all unprovoked seizures in these studies ranges
23   II,     5.  5.  3|             epilepsy and unprovoked seizures in Europe has been reported
24   II,     5.  5.  3|      incidence of single unprovoked seizures and epilepsy was prospectively
25   II,     5.  5.  3|         original source~ ~ ~Partial seizures are more common than generalized
26   II,     5.  5.  3|             common than generalized seizures both in children and adults.
27   II,     5.  5.  3|        European) countries, partial seizures were reported in 55-60%
28   II,     5.  5.  3|           60% of cases, generalized seizures in 26-32%, and unclassifiable
29   II,     5.  5.  3|             32%, and unclassifiable seizures in 8-17%. The corresponding
30   II,     5.  5.  3|             partial and generalized seizures may be largely explained
31   II,     5.  5.  3|      inclusion of acute symptomatic seizures.~ ~Table 5.5.3.4.4. Community-based
32   II,     5.  5.  3|           2004). Remote symptomatic seizures and refractory epilepsy
33   II,     5.  5.  3|            Generalised tonic-clonic seizures have been associated to
34   II,     5.  5.  3|            in patients with partial seizures are inconsistent. Status
35   II,     5.  5.  3|            generalized tonic-clonic seizures and a complicated and unstable
36   II,     5.  5.  3|             at least two unprovoked seizures have occurred. A population-based
37   II,     5.  5.  3|      patients with active epilepsy (seizures during sleep or on awakening,
38   II,     5.  5.  3|           jerks, and simple partial seizures)(Table 5.5.3.4.5). The issue
39   II,     5.  5.  3|           attributable to epileptic seizures is extremely low, ranging
40   II,     5.  5.  3|              idiopathic (3 months)~ Seizures not impairing driving (3
41   II,     5.  5.  3|       impairing driving (3 months)~ Seizures during sleep, with pattern
42   II,     5.  5.  3|         driving~Denmark I 12 months Seizures during sleep (license valid
43   II,     5.  5.  3|          tests (3 months)~ Sporadic seizures (6 months)~ Myoclonias (
44   II,     5.  5.  3|       Prohibited~France I 12 months Seizures only on awakening~ II 24-
45   II,     5.  5.  3|       awakening~ II 24-60 months No seizures in previous 3 years~Germany
46   II,     5.  5.  3|          Germany I 12 months Single seizures or occasion-related seizures~ (
47   II,     5.  5.  3|        seizures or occasion-related seizures~ (3-6 months)~ First seizure,
48   II,     5.  5.  3|         months)~Ireland I 12 months Seizures during sleep established
49   II,     5.  5.  3|        seizure (3 months)~ Sporadic seizures (6 months)~ Myoclonias,
50   II,     5.  5.  3|          Myoclonias, single partial seizures (3 months)~ Treatment stop/
51   II,     5.  5.  3|          United Kingdom I 12 months Seizures during sleep with pattern
52   II,     5.  5.  3|     patients with acute symptomatic seizures, single unprovoked seizures
53   II,     5.  5.  3|         seizures, single unprovoked seizures and recurrent unprovoked
54   II,     5.  5.  3|            and recurrent unprovoked seizures (epilepsy). Cohorts of patients
55   II,     5.  5.  3|      characterization of unprovoked seizures in adults: a prospective
56   II,     5.  5.  3|             epilepsy and unprovoked seizures. Epilepsia 43:1402-1409.~
57   II,     5.  5.  3|     Forsgren L (2001): Remission of seizures in a population-based adult
58   II,     5.  5.  3|        bradycardia during epileptic seizures: relation to sudden death
59   II,     5.  5.  3|           of people with unprovoked seizures: a population-based study.
60   II,     5.  5.  3|             Incidence of unprovoked seizures and epilepsy in Iceland
61   II,     5.  5.  3|        incidence study of epileptic seizures in children. Acta Paediatr
62   II,     5.  5.  3|              Long-term prognosis of seizures with onset in childhood.
63   II,     9.  3.  2|    still-born babies: (1) eclamptic seizures, (2) surgery (other than
64  III,    10.  2.  1|              drug market and crime (seizures, prices, drug-related offences,
65  III,    10.  2.  1|         from POUs estimates, police seizures, drug-related deaths and
66  III,    10.  2.  1|            some increases in heroin seizures and in the incidence of
67  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|     sclerosis~sedentariness~seizure~seizures~self-esteem~self-harm~self-management~