Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  1.  1|  polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, radon gas, asbestos); some pesticides;
 2   II,     5.  8.  7|      Kromhout H, Garcia-Esteban R, Radon R, Jarvis D, Toren K, Künzli
 3  III,    10.  1    |  association in the case of cancer/radon to a low likelihood as in
 4  III,    10.  1    |         radiation (incl. sunlight)~radon~dioxins~ ~Cardiovascular
 5  III,    10.  3.  1|         physical stressors include radon, UV radiation, electromagnetic
 6  III,    10.  3.  1|    environmental noise. Radiation, radon exposure and noise have
 7  III,    10.  3.  1|            for the radioactive gas radon. Exposure to radon increases
 8  III,    10.  3.  1| radioactive gas radon. Exposure to radon increases significantly
 9  III,    10.  3.  1|         description and analysis~ ~Radon~ ~Current levels of ionising
10  III,    10.  3.  1| differences due to the presence of radon. Radon is a radioactive
11  III,    10.  3.  1|          to the presence of radon. Radon is a radioactive gas formed
12  III,    10.  3.  1|      radioactive decay of uranium; radon seeps out of the ground
13  III,    10.  3.  1|          exposure is permeation of radon gas into buildings through
14  III,    10.  3.  1|            through the ground, but radon from water, outdoor air
15  III,    10.  3.  1|  contribute to the total exposure. Radon decays to radon daughters,
16  III,    10.  3.  1|          exposure. Radon decays to radon daughters, some of which
17  III,    10.  3.  1|          radiation. Alpha-emitting radon daughters are adsorbed onto
18  III,    10.  3.  1|   relationship between exposure to radon and the development of lung
19  III,    10.  3.  1|           Netherlands, exposure to radon in dwellings leads to 100
20  III,    10.  3.  1|          cancer can be ascribed to radon exposure per year (Barns,
21  III,    10.  3.  1|            on domestic exposure to radon establishes a clear linear
22  III,    10.  3.  1|       cancer risk and the level of radon exposure (Darby et al, 2005).
23  III,    10.  3.  1|          Europe can be ascribed to radon, which of a total of 330
24  III,    10.  3.  1|         000 deaths in Europe/year. Radon is also a well known occupational
25  III,    10.  3.  1|     epidemiological data for their radon quantitative risk estimates.
26  III,    10.  3.  1|   considers the combined effect of radon daughter exposure and smoking
27  III,    10.  3.  1| determining the risk associated to radon exposure. With the numbers
28  III,    10.  3.  1|           numbers presented above, radon is clearly the environmental
29  III,    10.  3.  1|           if childhood exposure to radon increases the risk of lung
30  III,    10.  3.  1|            studies suggesting that radon could increase the risk
31  III,    10.  3.  1| inconclusive. Gamma radiation from radon decay in construction materials (
32  III,    10.  3.  1|          to confirm this.~ ~Indoor radon exposure caused by radon
33  III,    10.  3.  1|           radon exposure caused by radon gas seeping into the building,
34  III,    10.  3.  1|         measure. Another source of radon exposure is building materials.
35  III,    10.  3.  1|     Exposure is reduced by routine radon monitoring of building material
36  III,    10.  3.  1|        will likely increase indoor radon exposure. Almost all European
37  III,    10.  3.  1|            monitoring programs for radon. The intensity and the type
38  III,    10.  3.  1|          country and on the actual radon situation. Radon is not
39  III,    10.  3.  1|            actual radon situation. Radon is not evenly distributed
40  III,    10.  3.  1|           in the country. Clearly, radon monitoring and radon prevention
41  III,    10.  3.  1|      Clearly, radon monitoring and radon prevention strategies are
42  III,    10.  3.  1|      countries with an established radon problem. Radon mitigation
43  III,    10.  3.  1|         established radon problem. Radon mitigation in these countries
44  III,    10.  3.  1|   buildings and local and national radon maps. The vast majority
45  III,    10.  3.  1|         lower reference levels for radon in schools and kindergartens
46  III,    10.  3.  1|   monitoring of workers exposed to radon at work places.~ ~UV radiation~ ~
47  III,    10.  3.  1|     factors such as air pollution, radon and UV-radiation, the disease
48  III,    10.  3.  1|          the public against indoor radon exposure (90/143/Euratom).
49  III,    10.  3.  1|          of the public, the indoor radon reference level (annual
50  III,    10.  3.  1|   developments~ ~For what concerns radon, all EU Member States already
51  III,    10.  3.  1|       radiation sources (including radon) in work places, laid down
52  III,    10.  3.  1|           gaps and needs in indoor radon policymaking vary greatly
53  III,    10.  3.  1|      countries have well developed radon policies, while in others
54  III,    10.  3.  1|             including establishing radon maps, reference values for
55  III,    10.  3.  1|       Wichmann HE, Doll R, (2005): Radon in homes and risk of lung
56  III,    10.  3.  1|          associated to exposure to radon and smoking in a case-control
57  III,    10.  3.  1|        Morrison HI, Lane R (2007). Radon and lung cancer risk: An
58  III,    10.  3.  2|         radiation (incl. sunlight)~radon~dioxins~ ~Cardiovascular
59  III,    10.  4.  3|           such as arsenic, uranium radon or fluoride. In addition,
60  III,    10.  4.  3|          elements such as arsenic, radon, uranium or fluoride, industrial
61  III,    10.  4.  3|      contaminants such as arsenic, radon, uranium and fluorides depending
62  III,    10.  5.  1|     Environment Agency, 2007). For radon, asbestos and lead, the
63   IV,    12. 10    |     objective of public health law~Radon: objective of national plan
64   IV,    12. 10    |  Environmental policy~Child policy~Radon~Radon levels in schools,
65   IV,    12. 10    |          policy~Child policy~Radon~Radon levels in schools, preschools
66   IV,    13.  2.  3|         ulcers~1,000-3,000~ ~ ~ ~ ~Radon (interior)~Bacterial meningitis,
67  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|       rabies~radiation~radioactive~radon~rainfall~rare diseases~rash~