Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  1.  2|              friends, and healthcare providers. The complexity and heterogeneity
 2   II,     5.  1.  3|            programmes for healthcare providers in the field of chronic
 3   II,     5.  1.  3|           cooperate with health care providers, live healthily, and maintain
 4   II,     5.  1.  3|              provided by health care providers trained in the education
 5   II,     5.  1.  3|             its effects. Health care providers tend to talk to patients
 6   II,     5.  1.  3|     education managed by health care providers trained in the education
 7   II,     5.  3.  2|         cancer registries are unique providers of cancer data at population
 8   II,     5.  5.  1|              health and primary care providers before suicide: a review
 9   II,     5.  5.  3|        Anorexia Nervosa. Health care providers report treatment attendance
10   II,     5.  5.  3|               educators, health care providers, children and adolescents
11   II,     5.  5.  3|           and psychological) burden. Providers of care are aware of this
12   II,     5.  5.  3|           mental health services and providers;~· facilitate re-entry into
13   II,     5.  5.  3|              a blueprint for service providers and commissioners on the
14   II,     5.  5.  3|           health and social services providers, employers and other organizations
15   II,     5.  6.  5|     representatives; and health care providers want to be achieved. The
16   II,     5.  7.  5|            certification of dialysis providers. Nearly 90% of the dialysis
17   II,     5.  9.  3|          Allergy, 1997), health care providers and authorities are becoming
18   II,     5.  9.  3|           all statistics from health providers. Antiallergic drugs should
19   II,     5. 14.  2|             Other Oral Care Clinical Providers~The number and rates (per
20   II,     5. 14.  2|             other oral care clinical providers per 100,000 population.~
21   II,     5. 14.  5|          dental hygienists and other providers, and supporting education
22   II,     5. 14.  7|          such as the availability of providers. However, people without
23   II,     7.  2.  2|              is only granted to data providers.~htt ~ ~
24   II,     9.  1.  1| epidemiologists, clinicians and data providers across Europe.~ ~The EURO-PERISTAT
25   II,     9.  4.  5|             co-ordination among care providers. Surveys of therapies and
26   II,     9.  4.  5|           both the receivers and the providers of care. As well as caring
27   II,     9.  5.  6|              Characteristics of care providers and care receivers over
28  III,    10.  2.  1|           settings. Oral health care providers can also play a role in
29  III,    10.  5.  1|          knowledge networks etc. are providers of valid knowledge and good
30  III,    10.  5.  1|         recommendations, which allow providers and end-users with an acce ng
31   IV,    11.  1.  1|              health care facilities, providers, and pharmaceuticals. The
32   IV,    11.  1.  3|        improve efficiency by holding providers more accountable for the
33   IV,    11.  1.  3|            during care and choice of providers. While conceptually this
34   IV,    11.  1.  5|         asymmetry between purchasers/providers/patients is minimal or,
35   IV,    11.  1.  5|     including safety) not just price~Providers respond to a reduction in
36   IV,    11.  1.  5|           performance data to choose providers (e.g. Denmark and some states
37   IV,    11.  1.  5|             and New Zealand suggests providers respond to publicly reported
38   IV,    11.  1.  5|           performance to incentivize providers when negotiating contracts (
39   IV,    11.  1.  6|       methods used to pay healthcare providers create powerful incentives
40   IV,    11.  1.  6|             is an adequate supply of providers, minimal interference in
41   IV,    11.  1.  6|              provider. It fails when providers attempt to control supply
42   IV,    11.  1.  6|        prices at a level too low for providers to survive (rent controls).
43   IV,    11.  1.  6|         period of time, within which providers are committed to providing
44   IV,    11.  1.  6|           main approaches for paying providers. Primary care providers
45   IV,    11.  1.  6|              providers. Primary care providers are most commonly paid through
46   IV,    11.  1.  6|         payment are designed so that providers are paid an inclusive flat
47   IV,    11.  1.  6|             patient and to reimburse providers fairly and with the incentive
48   IV,    11.  1.  6|            example, it may encourage providers to treat patients with lower
49   IV,    11.  1.  6|            the contrary, it may lead providers not to treat patients with
50   IV,    11.  2.  1|            multidisciplinary team of providers. In recent years, there
51   IV,    11.  2.  1|        typically a greater choice of providers. In the latter case, the
52   IV,    11.  6.  1|        innovation and pressures from providers (Altman and Blendon 1979;
53   IV,    11.  6.  2|            the financial risk to the providers in order to improve efficiency.
54   IV,    11.  6.  2|             making both patients and providers reluctant to discuss them.
55   IV,    11.  6.  4|           pooled resource to service providers on behalf of the population
56   IV,    11.  6.  4|              financial risk onto the providers). While there is some overlap
57   IV,    11.  6.  4|         facilitate reimbursement for providers and control the diffusion
58   IV,    11.  6.  4|           Opposition also comes from providers, who would see a reduction
59   IV,    11.  6.  4|       geographic areas or healthcare providers, and specific characteristics
60   IV,    11.  6.  4|            performances of different providers or specific populations,
61   IV,    11.  6.  4|     population and/or the healthcare providers) and to define the benchmark (
62   IV,    11.  6.  5|          2004): "Paying for quality: providers' incentives for quality
63   IV,    12.  4    |              patients and healthcare providers; recognition of professional
64   IV,    12.  6    |         unions; (iii) health service providers and health insurance; and (
65   IV,    13.  5    |            health and social service providers is the major challenge confronting
66   IV,    13.  8    |             health care etc. Service providers range from small, local
67  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|   professionals~prostate~proteinuria~providers~pseudomonas~psittacosis~