Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.  7    |            years, there is a trend back to the city, with new residential
 2   II,     5.  5.  3|           southwestern Finland and back to northeastern Sweden.
 3   II,     5.  6.  1|           symptomatic, such as low back pain.~ ~Musculoskeletal
 4   II,     5.  6.  1|          spinal disorders e.g. low back pain; (4) regional and widespread
 5   II,     5.  6.  1|        arthritis, osteoporosis and back pain.~ ~Musculoskeletal
 6   II,     5.  6.  3|       often the situation with low back pain; or may be chronic
 7   II,     5.  6.  3|         with more widespread pain, back pain and knee pain (Urwin
 8   II,     5.  6.  3| experienced muscle, joint, neck or back pain which affected their
 9   II,     5.  6.  3|        years later she may present back pain, with or without minor
10   II,     5.  6.  3|            corticosteroid use. The back pain may remit and relapse
11   II,     5.  6.  3|    European Community 1998).~ ~Low Back pain~ ~Definition~ ~Low
12   II,     5.  6.  3|            pain~ ~Definition~ ~Low back pain is a major health and
13   II,     5.  6.  3|            or more episodes of low back pain in their lives. It
14   II,     5.  6.  3|            non-specific”. Specific back pain is defined as symptoms
15   II,     5.  6.  3|     whereas 90% of people with low back pain have no clearly defined
16   II,     5.  6.  3|          cause.~ ~Non-specific low back pain is usually classified
17   II,     5.  6.  3|     duration and recurrence. Acute back pain is of less than 6 weeks
18   II,     5.  6.  3|         are described as recurrent back pain.~ ~Natural history~ ~
19   II,     5.  6.  3|     history~ ~Most episodes of low back pain settle after a couple
20   II,     5.  6.  3|       exacerbations of chronic low back pain. Many people with chronic
21   II,     5.  6.  3|            people with chronic low back pain also have widespread
22   II,     5.  6.  3|         year; the incidence of low back pain with sciatica was 11.
23   II,     5.  6.  3|            history of previous low back pain.~ ~Prevalence~ ~Lifetime
24   II,     5.  6.  3|        varies between 58% and 84%. Back pain is very common but
25   II,     5.  6.  3|         studied that are suffering back pain at a particular point
26   II,     5.  6.  3|              The occurrence of low back pain is associated with
27   II,     5.  6.  3|        body weight and strength of back and abdominal muscles. Psychological
28   II,     5.  6.  3|    associated to the occurrence of back pain are anxiety, depression,
29   II,     5.  6.  3|            work loss attributed to back pain more than physical
30   II,     5.  6.  3|          society (socioeconomic)~ ~Back pain has a marked effect
31   II,     5.  6.  3|    prevented during the episode of back pain by worsening of the
32   II,     5.  6.  3|           About 90% of the cost of back pain is indirect due to
33   II,     5.  6.  3|   guidelines for prevention in low back pain http ). The costs are
34   II,     5.  6.  3|          by 1025% of those with back pain persisting for more
35   II,     5.  6.  3|       month. In cases with chronic back pain, the impact on health
36   II,     5.  6.  3|         greater awareness of minor back symptoms and willingness
37   II,     5.  6.  4|     sick leave over 4 days had low back pain, 20% neck and shoulder
38   II,     5.  6.  4|           pensions. In Norway, low back disorders are the most common
39   II,     5.  6.  6|         Epidemiological aspects of back pain. J Soc Occup Med 36:
40   II,     5.  6.  6|            670~Frymoyer JW (1988): Back pain and sciatica. N Engl
41   II,     5.  6.  6|            P (1999): Prevalence of back, neck and shoulder problems
42   II,     5.  6.  6|          Cooper C, Coggon D (2000) Back pain in Britain: comparison
43   II,     5.  7.  5|         The government has stepped back from a system of planning;
44   II,     5. 11.  3|    concentrations on the subject’s back and read 48 to 96 hours
45   II,     8.  1.  3|           circulatory problems and back and neck problems were less
46   II,     8.  1.  3|            indicated limb, neck or back problems, 24% indicated
47   II,     8.  1.  3|           those with limb, neck or back problems and by persons
48   II,     9.  1.  1|            and maternity care date back at least to the mid-nineteenth
49   II,     9.  2.  5|         committed itself to report back on their progress to the
50   II,     9.  3.  3|          South the new trend dates back only to the ‘80s (Bajos
51   II,     9.  5.  3|           This manifests itself as back pain (30%), stress (28%),
52   II,     9.  5.  3|        suffer more from accidents, back pain and hearing loss (EU
53  III,    10.  2.  1|         countries, with data going back to the 1960s, the amount
54  III,    10.  2.  5|         cancer forms can be traced back to environmental exposures
55  III,    10.  3.  2|         cancer forms can be traced back to environmental exposures
56  III,    10.  4.  1|        from air pollutants relates back to childhood. Air pollutants
57  III,    10.  4.  5|         can be a legacy stretching back many decades or centuries.
58  III,    10.  4.  5|       pollutants (POPs) which date back to the Soviet era, and which
59  III,    10.  5.  1|       Conference reference), dates back to the beginning of mankind
60  III,    10.  5.  3|           Week in 2000, ‘Turn your back on MSDs’.~ ~Member States’
61   IV,    11.  1.  3|            of health systems dates back to the 1800s when Florence
62   IV,    11.  3.  2|           later profits are clawed back by the government (the maximum
63   IV,    11.  4    |        world. The reporting is fed back to the policy world to inform
64   IV,    11.  4    |          as Diabetes type-2 or low back pain, to alerts on single
65   IV,    11.  6.  5|            a bad idea keeps coming back (or, what's health got to
66   IV,    12.  6    |          It also intends to report back to the Forum about the follow-up
67   IV,    13.  8    |        national level. They report back on gaps and propose ways