Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  1.  1|              some conditions such as coronary hearth diseases. Finally,
 2   II,     5.  2.Acr|             BMI~Body Mass Index~CABG~Coronary Artery Bypass Graft~CHD~
 3   II,     5.  2.Acr|              Artery Bypass Graft~CHD~Coronary Heart Disease~CT-Scan~Computed
 4   II,     5.  2.Acr|            Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty~SBP~Systolic
 5   II,     5.  2.  2|            Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty [PTCA] and Coronary
 6   II,     5.  2.  2|      Coronary Angioplasty [PTCA] and Coronary Artery By-pass Graft [CABG])
 7   II,     5.  2.  2|          factors and advancements in coronary care to the decline in CVD
 8   II,     5.  2.  2|              64 years as mean annual coronary events rates derived from
 9   II,     5.  2.  2|           mid 90s). Annual change in coronary events and 28 day-case fatality
10   II,     5.  2.  3|        hospital in-patient database, coronary revascularization procedures (
11   II,     5.  2.  3|      distinguish between direct PCI (coronary angioplasty performed in
12   II,     5.  2.  3|           data on morbidity of acute coronary events - although collected
13   II,     5.  2.  3|             10-year surveillance for coronary events and 28-day case fatality
14   II,     5.  2.  3|        hospital, first and recurrent coronary events represent the most
15   II,     5.  2.  3|        countries. Case fatality from coronary heart disease (CHD) was
16   II,     5.  2.  3|              population. Mean annual coronary events rates (fatal and
17   II,     5.  2.  3|          hospital); annual change in coronary event rate in 10 years.~ ~
18   II,     5.  2.  5|              report on Prevention of coronary heart disease distinguished (
19   II,     5.  2.  6|       country specific mortality for Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) (Keys
20   II,     5.  2.  6|               while the reduction of coronary events is less large, but
21   II,     5.  2.  6|                Lipids, diabetes, and coronary heart disease: insights
22   II,     5.  2.  6|   Epidemiological studies related to coronary heart disease: characteristics
23   II,     5.  2.  6|         hypertension and the risk of coronary heart disease and mortality
24   II,     5.  2.  6|              of premature death from coronary heart disease continuous
25   II,     5.  2.  7|       EUROCISS Working Group (2003): Coronary and cerebrovascular population-based
26   II,     5.  2.  7|            Project (2001): Trends in coronary risk factors in the WHO
27   II,     5.  2.  7|    antecedents of fatal and nonfatal coronary heart disease events. JAMA
28   II,     5.  2.  7|            risk factors to trends in coronary event rates across the WHO
29   II,     5.  2.  7|             risk profile and 10-year coronary heart disease incidence
30   II,     5.  2.  7|   coronary-event rates to changes in coronary heart disease mortality:
31   II,     5.  2.  7|          contributions of changes in coronary care to improving survival,
32   II,     5.  2.  7|           survival, event rates, and coronary heart disease mortality
33   II,     5.  2.  7|      Committee (1982): Prevention of coronary heart disease. WHO Technical
34   II,     5.  5.  3|              smoking: observation on coronary thrombosis. National Cancer
35   II,     5.  6.  3|              for mental retardation. Coronary heart diseases and other
36   II,     9        |        reduce the risk of developing coronary heart disease, including
37   II,     9.  3.  1|             such as osteoporosis and coronary heart disease (CHD). Studies
38   II,     9.  3.  1|            short-term outcomes after coronary events or revascularization.
39   II,     9.  3.  1|           diabetes may have a higher coronary heart diseases (CHD) mortality
40   II,     9.  3.  1|      arteries being smaller than the coronary arteries, the development
41   II,     9.  3.  1|             early warning system for coronary artery disease (Jackson &
42   II,     9.  3.  1|      Erectile dysfunction and silent coronary artery disease: abnormal
43   II,     9.  3.  1|         abnormal computed tomography coronary angiogram in the presence
44   II,     9.  3.  1|              BMI~Body Mass Index~CHD~Coronary Hearth Disease~DG-SANCO~
45   II,     9.  4.  3|          Forum, 2003). Morbidity for Coronary Heart Disease appears to
46   II,     9.  4.  4|        reduce the risk of developing coronary heart disease, including
47   II,     9.  4.  7|             Heart Foundation (2001): Coronary Heart Disease Statistics:
48   II,     9.  4.  8|        immunodeficiency syndrome~CHD~Coronary Heart Disease~DoH~Department
49   II,     9.  5.  4| cardiovascular diseases - e.g. acute coronary syndrome - and mental illnesses -
50  III,    10.  1.  1|           fat as well as the risk of coronary heart disease (Fagard, 2005;
51  III,    10.  2.  1|               Acute myeloid leukemia~Coronary heart disease~Asthma*~Coronary
52  III,    10.  2.  1|       Coronary heart disease~Asthma*~Coronary heart disease~Stomach~Pneumonia~
53  III,    10.  2.  1|         exposed to cigarette smoke~- Coronary health disease~- Cerebrovascular
54  III,    10.  2.  1|            Alcohol Concentration~CHD~Coronary Heart Disease~CHOICE~CHOsing
55  III,    10.  2.  1|      threshold effect.~ ~The risk of coronary heart disease decreases
56  III,    10.  2.  1|         heart arrhythmias and sudden coronary death, even in people without
57  III,    10.  2.  1| substantially increases the risk for coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes,
58  III,    10.  2.  2|       country specific mortality for Coronary Heart Disease (CHD). Subsequently,
59  III,    10.  2.  3|               while the reduction of coronary events is less large, but
60  III,    10.  2.  4|            risk of multiple myeloma, coronary heart diseases, pre-menopausal
61  III,    10.  2.  5|              among children who have coronary events as adults. N Engl
62  III,    10.  6.  1|            have an increased risk of coronary heart disease (De Vogli
63   IV,    11.  1.  5|           disease treatments (as for coronary heart disease in the UK
64   IV,    11.  6.  4|         patients who underwent CABG, coronary angiography or percutaneous
65   IV,    13.  2.  3|           the Netherlands, including coronary heart diseases and depression.
66   IV,    13.  2.  3|          Lack of physical activity~ ~Coronary heart diseases,~Depression,