Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  8.  2|                 interstitial ( J9 · neonatal ( P2 ~· mediastinal ( J9 ~·
 2   II,     5.  9.  7|          Wang Y, McCusker C (2006): Neonatal exposure with LPS and/or
 3   II,     6.  3.  3|             female ratio, 4.4:1).~ ~Neonatal syphilis is still unacceptably
 4   II,     9        |         antepartum, intrapartum and neonatal complications including
 5   II,     9        |         labor, caesarean births and neonatal intensive care unit admissions
 6   II,     9        |        associated with maternal and neonatal conditions such as hypertension,
 7   II,     9        |             a much higher fetal and neonatal mortality risk than singleton
 8   II,     9.  1.  1|                      9.1.1. Foetal, neonatal and infant mortality and
 9   II,     9.  1.  1|          determinants of foetal and neonatal death in Europe today include
10   II,     9.  1.  1|     reporting systems.~ ~Foetal and neonatal mortality have declined
11   II,     9.  1.  1|              Definitions of foetal, neonatal and infant mortality and
12   II,     9.  1.  1|      comparisons between countries.~Neonatal mortality~The number of
13   II,     9.  1.  1|             number of deaths in the neonatal period (up to 28 completed
14   II,     9.  1.  1|          timing of death into early neonatal deaths (at 0-6 days after
15   II,     9.  1.  1|          after live birth) and late neonatal deaths (at 7-27 days after
16   II,     9.  1.  1|          birth).~Comparisons of the neonatal mortality rate at early
17   II,     9.  1.  1|           it is possible that early neonatal deaths may be recorded as
18   II,     9.  1.  1|        create a bias when comparing neonatal mortality rates at low gestational
19   II,     9.  1.  1|           in the same year.~Same as neonatal mortality~ ~Table 9.1.1.
20   II,     9.  1.  1|         deaths and rates of foetal, neonatal and infant mortality in
21   II,     9.  1.  1|            into four themes: fetal, neonatal and child health; maternal
22   II,     9.  1.  1|          for further development)~ ~Neonatal health~ C: Fetal mortality
23   II,     9.  1.  1|          birth weight, plurality~C: Neonatal mortality rate by gestational
24   II,     9.  1.  1|        induced abortions~ F: Severe neonatal morbidity among babies at
25   II,     9.  1.  1|             babies at high risk~ F: Neonatal screening policies~Maternal
26   II,     9.  1.  1| presentation and analysis~ ~Foetal, neonatal and infant mortality~ ~Table
27   II,     9.  1.  1|           provides rates of foetal, neonatal and infant mortality for
28   II,     9.  1.  1|             2 show the evolution of neonatal and foetal mortality over
29   II,     9.  1.  1|           over the past 30 years.~ ~Neonatal mortality~As shown in Figure
30   II,     9.  1.  1|  significant decline in the rate of neonatal mortality in the last thirty
31   II,     9.  1.  1|         last thirty years. In 1975, neonatal mortality rates ranged from
32   II,     9.  1.  1|            to 9.5 per 1 000 births. Neonatal mortality rates are about
33   II,     9.  1.  1|             differences in rates of neonatal mortality between countries
34   II,     9.  1.  1|          Norway, the median rate of neonatal mortality in 2004 was 2.
35   II,     9.  1.  1|            is more complicated than neonatal mortality, as explained
36   II,     9.  1.  1|      depends greatly on the rate of neonatal mortality among children
37   II,     9.  1.  1|            if every country had the neonatal mortality rate of those
38   II,     9.  1.  1|         lowest rates, the number of neonatal deaths every year would
39   II,     9.  1.  1|          data on preterm births and neonatal morbidities would make it
40   II,     9.  1.  1|           1995-2000. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2004;15(3):193-7.~Castles
41   II,     9.  1.  1|              Kelly E, et al (2002): Neonatal survival rates in 860 singleton
42   II,     9.  1.  1|             plurality and growth on neonatal outcome compared with singleton
43   II,     9.  1.  1|            cause-specific fetal and neonatal mortality in twin and singleton
44   II,     9.  1.  1|           2007): Characteristics of neonatal units that care for very
45   II,     9.  1.  2|          diseases diagnosed through neonatal screening may be included
46   II,     9.  1.  2|           death for stillbirths and neonatal deaths, thus, this figure
47   II,     9.  1.  2|    stillbirth or as live-birth with neonatal death in some countries,
48   II,     9.  1.  2|           outnumber stillbirths and neonatal deaths with congenital anomaly (
49   II,     9.  1.  2|           as a TOPFA, stillbirth or neonatal death (but excluding spontaneous
50   II,     9.  1.  2|       ascertainment of stillbirths, neonatal deaths and TOPFA.~ ~Despite
51   II,     9.  1.  2|         data on diagnoses after the neonatal period, and with full access
52   II,     9.  1.  2|         antepartum, intrapartum and neonatal complications including
53   II,     9.  1.  2|         labor, caesarean births and neonatal intensive care unit admissions
54   II,     9.  1.  2|        associated with maternal and neonatal conditions such as hypertension,
55   II,     9.  1.  2|             a much higher fetal and neonatal mortality risk than singleton
56   II,     9.  1.  2|             surgical treatments and neonatal intensive care have improved
57   II,     9.  1.  2|            Mortality", Prenatal and Neonatal Medicine, Vol 4, pp 441-
58   II,     9.  3.  2|           1995-2000. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2004;15(3):193-7.~ ~
59   II,     9.  3.  2|              Kelly E, et al (2002): Neonatal survival rates in 860 singleton
60   II,     9.  3.  2|             plurality and growth on neonatal outcome compared with singleton
61   II,     9.  3.  2|            cause-specific fetal and neonatal mortality in twin and singleton
62   II,     9.  3.  2|           Larroque B, et al (2007): Neonatal and 5-year outcomes after
63   II,     9.  3.  2|           2007): Characteristics of neonatal units that care for very
64   IV,    11.  6.  4|         transplantation, emergency, neonatal/maternal, miscellanea) and
65   IV,    13.  6.  2|           those data which refer to neonatal intensive care or special