Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.  5    |    generally means a shift in the sharing of risks between beneficiaries,
 2   II,     4.  1    |           of Healthy People 2010. Sharing of experiences with HLY
 3   II,     5.  4.  6|           the basis for knowledge sharing in Europe. The initiative
 4   II,     5.  5.  3|          will allow good practice sharing between the EU Member States.
 5   II,     5. 14.  6|         problem that requires the sharing of responsibilities among
 6   II,     5. 15.  5|     chance of success through the sharing of expertise and resources;
 7   II,     6.  3.  1|        action, in identifying and sharing best practice, and in suggesting
 8   II,     9.  1    |        greatly throughout Europe. Sharing knowledge about this diversity
 9   II,     9.  3.  2|   European countries can learn by sharing their experiences in healthcare
10   II,     9.  5.  4|     practices in the interests of sharing information, future planning
11  III,    10.  4.  2|          system which ensures the sharing of information concerning
12  III,    10.  4.  2|        Feed (RASFF) to ensure the sharing of information concerning
13  III,    10.  4.  2|       risk assessment of compound sharing the same mode of action
14  III,    10.  4.  2|       channels and procedures for sharing information between the
15   IV,    11.  1.  3|    largely by: a) increasing cost sharing; b) introducing competition
16   IV,    11.  1.  4|        such as the degree of cost sharing in the system. In much of
17   IV,    11.  1.  4|    countries that do rely on cost sharing arrangements, extensive
18   IV,    11.  1.  5|         developing guidelines and sharing information, as in the EU
19   IV,    11.  5.  1|       through international organ sharing.~ ~In the light of these
20   IV,    11.  5.  4|        focused on promoting organ sharing and cooperation, seems to
21   IV,    11.  5.  6|         promoting cooperation and sharing information and best practices
22   IV,    11.  5.  6|   co-operation~ – Procurement and sharing of organs for highly immunised
23   IV,    11.  5.  7|  cooperation among Member States, sharing programmes and best practices
24   IV,    11.  6    |          coverage (including cost sharing), and how benefits are defined,
25   IV,    11.  6.  2|           defining benefits, cost sharing. The implications of these
26   IV,    11.  6.  2|          and depth (level of cost sharing) of coverage varies across
27   IV,    11.  6.  2|            In some countries cost sharing has been introduced and
28   IV,    11.  6.  2|            Careful design of cost sharing policies is needed to protect
29   IV,    11.  6.  2|    European health systems), cost sharing for services in the public
30   IV,    11.  6.  2|         payment include both cost sharing and direct payments) (see
31   IV,    11.  6.  2|        can be used to reduce cost sharing or finance care for population
32   IV,    11.  6.  2|           those eligible for cost sharing) (Thomson, Foubister and
33   IV,    11.  6.  2|          privatepayments), cost sharing (individuals who are covered
34   IV,    11.  6.  2|          the public system). Cost sharing exists to some extent in
35   IV,    11.  6.  2|        three forms of direct cost sharing consist of: co-payment,
36   IV,    11.  6.  2|      benefit to them. Hence, cost sharing is expected to improve efficiency
37   IV,    11.  6.  2|          are under pressure, cost sharing has also been argued to
38   IV,    11.  6.  2|    unlikely to result from a cost sharing arrangement. Finally, it
39   IV,    11.  6.  2|         the literature shows cost sharing for prescription drugs leads
40   IV,    11.  6.  2|  out-of-pocket payments into cost sharing, direct payments and, if
41   IV,    11.  6.  2|        due to an increase in cost sharing but may also reflect increases
42   IV,    11.  6.  2|           have in place some cost sharing for services covered by
43   IV,    11.  6.  2|            In all countries, cost sharing is applied to pharmaceuticals
44   IV,    11.  6.  2|       countries also require cost sharing for ambulatory physician
45   IV,    11.  6.  2|         the point of use but cost sharing is applied to inpatient
46   IV,    11.  6.  2|          For inpatient care, cost sharing tends to be in the form
47   IV,    11.  6.  2|  Prescription drugs may have cost sharing in the form of a fixed co-payment
48   IV,    11.  6.  2|         newer Member States, cost sharing for ambulatory physicians
49   IV,    11.  6.  2|          introduced to limit cost sharing, e.g. in Estonia cost sharing
50   IV,    11.  6.  2|     sharing, e.g. in Estonia cost sharing for primary care was abolished
51   IV,    11.  6.  2|   European countries require cost sharing for at least some services,
52   IV,    11.  6.  2|           in some countries, cost sharing arrangements were changed
53   IV,    11.  6.  2|          11.13. Examples for cost sharing exemptions~ ~ ~Clinical
54   IV,    11.  6.  4|          solidarity principles by sharing risks across a larger population.
55   IV,    11.  6.  4|     package and the level of cost sharing in the system; where services
56   IV,    11.  6.  5|         literature review of cost sharing for prescription drugs:
57   IV,    11.  6.  5|        2004): An overview of cost sharing for health services in the
58   IV,    11.  6.  5| appropriate role for patient cost sharing. Critical challenges for
59   IV,    11.  6.  5|   Mossialos E et al. (2003): Cost sharing for health services in the
60   IV,    12.  1    |          order to facilitate data sharing –~ ~ ~Important aspects
61   IV,    12.  3    |    problems they are increasingly sharing. Through the open method
62   IV,    12.  4    |          by bringing together and sharing knowledge and information,
63   IV,    12. 10    |       regulation to allow for the sharing of views with the Health