Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     4.  2    |           countries men started to smoke less in the 1970s, the negative
 2   II,     4.  2    |     countries. As women started to smoke later than men, the negative
 3   II,     5.  2.  4|           the obvious exception of smoke, are mostly caused by the
 4   II,     5.  9.  4|          black and brown coal/wood smoke (BBCW) were associated primarily
 5   II,     7.  1    |          seat belts, pool fencing, smoke detectors, barrier free
 6   II,     9        |         reported that children who smoke frequently have low self
 7   II,     9.  1.  1|            Percentage of women who smoke during pregnancy~R: Distribution
 8   II,     9.  2.  4|         reported that children who smoke frequently have low self
 9   II,     9.  2.  7|      Jarvis, MJ (2004): Why People Smoke. British Medical Journal
10   II,     9.  5.  1|       countries. As women begin to smoke later than men and are slower
11   II,     9.  5.  3|       weight. Moreover, many women smoke in order to relax and relieve
12   II,     9.  5.  3|           has suggested that women smoke more in situations of difficulty
13   II,     9.  5.  3|           EU, more men are seen to smoke than women, with the only
14   II,     9.  5.  3|          noticed that children who smoke frequently have low self
15   II,     9.  5.  3|              Women who continue to smoke, and those who fail at attempts
16   II,     9.  5.  3|       women who quit smoking. They smoke a higher number of cigarettes
17   II,     9.  5.  3|           resisting temptations to smoke, and are thus cognitively
18   II,     9.  5.  6|      Jarvis M J (2004): Why People Smoke. British Medical Journal;
19  III,    10.  1    | recommendations and less likely to smoke (Parsons et al, 1999).~ ~
20  III,    10.  1.  1|            Exposure to second hand smoke and active smoking are closely
21  III,    10.  1.  1|             Children whose parents smoke and who are therefore exposed
22  III,    10.  1.  1|   therefore exposed to second hand smoke are more likely to smoke
23  III,    10.  1.  1|           smoke are more likely to smoke in the future (Gidding et
24  III,    10.  2.  1|       Health Risks~SHS~Second-hand smoke~TCS~Tobacco Control Scale~
25  III,    10.  2.  1|         and 25% of women in the EU smoke. In general, men smoke more
26  III,    10.  2.  1|          EU smoke. In general, men smoke more than women, although
27  III,    10.  2.  1|       education and of younger age smoke more. In most European countries
28  III,    10.  2.  1|          diseases caused by direct smoke and second-hand smoke have
29  III,    10.  2.  1|       direct smoke and second-hand smoke have been identified in
30  III,    10.  2.  1|         smoking and by second-hand smoke~Source: CDC (2004); CDC (
31  III,    10.  2.  1|     Diseases caused by second-hand smoke~Cancers~Chronic diseases~
32  III,    10.  2.  1|     diseases caused by second-hand smoke: Evidence of causation is
33  III,    10.  2.  1|        people exposed to cigarette smoke~- Coronary health disease~-
34  III,    10.  2.  1|    prevalence of the environmental smoke exposure were published
35  III,    10.  2.  1|           proportion of adults who smoke in the EU27 ranges from
36  III,    10.  2.  1|          Europe.~ ~In general, men smoke more than women. However,
37  III,    10.  2.  1|       determinants~ ~Men generally smoke more than women. Although
38  III,    10.  2.  1|           the Americas, more girls smoke than boys, and there is
39  III,    10.  2.  1|           Younger people generally smoke more than older ones. The
40  III,    10.  2.  1|            smokers and second-hand smoke (SHS) victims, and~· “Indirect
41  III,    10.  2.  1|      chemicals can be found in the smoke.~ ~Three kinds of smoke
42  III,    10.  2.  1|            smoke.~ ~Three kinds of smoke can be distinguished, each
43  III,    10.  2.  1|        characteristics. Mainstream smoke is what emerges from the “
44  III,    10.  2.  1|       puffed cigarette. Sidestream smoke is what arises from the
45  III,    10.  2.  1|       Environmental tobacco smoke, smoke present in air, consists
46  III,    10.  2.  1|     consists of exhaled mainstream smoke and sidestream smoke.~ ~
47  III,    10.  2.  1|    mainstream smoke and sidestream smoke.~ ~Dependence is stronger
48  III,    10.  2.  1|            and lessens the urge to smoke. Varenicline, recently approved
49  III,    10.  2.  1|          research. The quest for a smoke free EU also forms part
50  III,    10.  2.  1|     smokescreen - 10 reasons for a smoke free Europe. ERSJ Ltd. Available
51  III,    10.  2.  1|          Population to Second hand Smoke: 1998-2002. Environ Health
52  III,    10.  3.  4|           cause burns, damage from smoke inhalation and other injuries.
53  III,    10.  5.  1|            and coal burning, black smoke concentrations declined
54  III,    10.  5.  1|            Smith KR (2004): Indoor smoke from solid fuels - Assessing
55  III,    10.  5.  3|   inconvenient temperatures and to smoke - fumes as well as to tobacco smoke -
56   IV,    12.  2    |            and lessens the urge to smoke. Varenicline, recently approved
57   IV,    12.  2    |          research. The quest for a smoke free EU also forms part
58   IV,    12. 10    |      Employees have the right to a smoke free working environment (§
59   IV,    12. 10    |            the European Network of Smoke Free Hospitals. It aims
60   IV,    12. 10    |           smoking only and only if smoke does not enter other parts
61   IV,    12. 10    |           possibilities for all to smoke.~Screening programmes~As