Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2. 10.  1|  polymorphism’ (SNP) and phenotype databases. The long term annotation
 2   II,     5.  3.  2|           records and radiotherapy databases) within a single institution.
 3   II,     5.  4.  2|            clinical items to other databases routinely available. Some
 4   II,     5.  4.  2|            a list of subjects from databases that do not involve clinical
 5   II,     5.  4.  2|         through linkage with other databases: diabetic patients may be
 6   II,     5.  4.  3|           level>5 mmol/l. In EUCID databases this risk factor was found
 7   II,     5.  4.  3|        level >2.3 mmol/l. In EUCID databases this risk factor was found
 8   II,     5.  4.  3|            varies in the different databases collected by 10 countries
 9   II,     5.  5.  1|   Katschhnig ET AL., 2006).~ ~ WHO databases~ ~The WHO Health for All (
10   II,     5.  5.  1|          Eurostat and the WHO EURO databases due to differences in presenting
11   II,     5.  5.  3|            covered in the European databases. With regard to the trend
12   II,     5.  5.  3|        suicide (Saha et al, 2007). Databases on suicides do not allow
13   II,     5.  5.  3|            to supplement morbidity databases with data on outpatient
14   II,     5.  5.  3|            improvement of existing databases (WHO/EUROSTAT) with harmonized
15   II,     5.  5.  3|            optimize statistics and databases, as well as to minimize
16   II,     5.  5.  3|      electronic health information databases. Data from the national
17   II,     5.  6.  2|      sources~ ~The epidemiological databases have been recently reviewed
18   II,     5.  7.  3|     gathered both by using medical databases (Ireland, England, Italy)
19   II,     5.  7.  3|         surveys. Data from medical databases overestimate the prevalence
20   II,     5.  7.  3|            times higher in medical databases in Ireland, England and
21   II,     5.  7.  3|            are reported in medical databases (Stevens et al, 2007). Stage
22   II,     5.  7.  3|     gathered both by using medical databases (Ireland, England, Italy)
23   II,     5.  7.  3|         surveys. Data from medical databases overestimate the prevalence
24   II,     5.  7.  3|            times higher in medical databases in Ireland, England and
25   II,     5.  7.  7|         Zoccali C (2007): Clinical databases and the QUEST initiative.
26   II,     5. 10.  2|                 5.10.2.1. Allergen databases~ ~Data on allergens in general,
27   II,     5. 10.  2|           large number of allergen databases that have been created for
28   II,     5. 10.  2|            These include molecular databases focused on protein sequences
29   II,     5. 10.  2|          structures, informational databases focused on clinical, biochemical
30   II,     5. 10.  2| information contained on the above databases vary greatly, with a high
31   II,     5. 10.  2|            allergens by individual databases. (Brusic et al, 2003).~ ~
32   II,     5. 10.  2|           10.1. Available allergen databases.~ ~Database~Web Address~
33   II,     5. 10.  2|            Address~General Purpose Databases~ ~Nucleic Acids Research
34   II,     5. 10.  2|             Nucleic Acids Research databases~http c/~Allergen Specific~ ~
35   II,     5. 10.  7|        Stelman SJ (2003): Allergen databases. Allergy 58(11):1093-1100.~ ~
36   II,     5. 10.  7|           2006): Allergen sequence databases. Mol Nutr Food Res. 50(7):
37   II,     5. 14.  2| international articles i.e. Pubmed databases are the main sources used
38   II,     5. 15.  2|           the list of RD, two main databases are listing thousands of
39   II,     5. 15.  5|           resource centres to host databases and repositories of biological
40   II,     7.  2.  3|       other existing international databases is the high level of desegregations,
41   II,     7.  3.  4|           only by members of these databases - and in the future also
42   II,     8.  2.  1|         may be inferred that these databases under-report this population
43   II,     8.  2.  1|      typically not linked to other databases. A notable exception is
44   II,     9.  1.  1|           in international routine databases such as EUROSTAT, WHO, OECD
45   II,     9.  1.  1|      existing international health databases are available on many of
46   II,     9.  1.  1|         available in international databases. Unfortunately, all of the
47   II,     9.  3.  2|         parity in existing routine databases. We also present data on
48   II,     9.  3.  2|         available in international databases. These indicators nonetheless
49   II,     9.  3.  2|          methods for using routine databases such as hospital discharge
50  III,    10.  3.  2|          webpage contains chemical databases and as well as links (htt /)
51  III,    10.  3.  4|            occurrence, a number of databases have been established around
52  III,    10.  3.  4|         formats and purpose. These databases, while individually useful,
53  III,    10.  3.  4|     compatible with other existing databases. Inconsistencies, data gaps
54  III,    10.  4.  1|       air-climate.eionet.europa.eu/databases/airbase/, accessed 7 March
55  III,    10.  4.  2|          information stored in the databases to identify vulnerabilities
56   IV,    11.  1.  5|           In addition, specialized databases and medicine information
57   IV,    11.  6.  4|          linkage between different databases on a national basis is available
58   IV,    12.  5    |          continuing development of databases, analyses and wider dissemination
59   IV,    13.  7.  5|        inability to link different databases at subject level, and the
60   IV,    13.  7.  5|        inability to link different databases at subject level poses a
61   IV,    13.  7.  5|          reutilisation of existing databases. As these new technologies