Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.  5    |     risks between beneficiaries, governments, sponsoring undertakings
 2   II,     5.  4.  2|     within the power of national governments and health departments to
 3   II,     5.  4.  4|      rather obvious for European Governments: we know from scientific
 4   II,     5.  4.  6| effective resources for national governments. Due to the great increase
 5   II,     5.  4.  6|    towards the disease. National governments should provide tools for
 6   II,     5.  5.  2|         of people with dementia. Governments are therefore obliged to
 7   II,     5.  5.  2|  population continues to age and governments are faced with the prospect
 8   II,     5.  5.  3|          and bulimia. Therefore, governments are obliged to look for
 9   II,     5.  5.  3|       the legislations of the EU governments regarding employment and
10   II,     5.  5.  3| community;~· It commits national governments and the European Commission
11   II,     5.  5.  3|    services that are provided by governments, for profit or no-profit
12   II,     5.  5.  3|         EU at a glance. European Governments on-line (2004): Available
13   II,     5.  6.  1|     Organisation, World Bank and governments throughout Europe, through
14   II,     5.  7.  1|      still largely overlooked by governments and health authorities and
15   II,     6.  3.  4|       integrated planning across governments;~· making plans operational
16   II,     7.  2    |            7.2. Data sources~ ~ ~Governments and private agencies maintain
17   II,     7.  5    |          monitoring of progress. Governments should make better use of
18   II,     7.  6    |       and costs of disabilities, governments will soon realize the great
19   II,     9.  3.  1|     organizations and several EU Governments have and continue to support
20   II,     9.  5.  4|     practice information between governments and other agencies working
21   II,     9.  5.  4|         s health. Among national governments, Austria produced the first
22   II,     9.  5.  4|         of Vienna in 2001. A few governments have developed men’s health
23   II,     9.  5.  5|        increasing among national governments in Europe and at European
24  III,    10.  2.  1|          in 1989, Member Statesgovernments have developed their own
25  III,    10.  2.  1|        outlined an approach that governments can adopt to prevent tens
26  III,    10.  2.  1|         report also reveals that governments around the world collect
27  III,    10.  2.  1|         179 Member States, gives governments and other groups a baseline
28  III,    10.  2.  1|    through a concerted action of governments and civil society. There
29  III,    10.  2.  1|          a priority for European governments.~ ~
30  III,    10.  2.  1|       decisions that are made by governments through laws, rules and
31  III,    10.  2.  1|  environments: the role of local governments. The solid facts (WHO, 2006e).
32  III,    10.  2.  1|         community level, through governments, to the international arena.
33  III,    10.  2.  1|  environments: the role of local governments. The Solid Facts. Copenhagen. (ht ~ ~
34  III,    10.  3.  4|        Across Europe, many other governments (local and national) have
35  III,    10.  3.  4| emergency intervention plans, no governments had strategies to prevent
36  III,    10.  5.  1|  environments. The role of local governments. WHO Regional Office for
37   IV,    11.  1.  3|   systems in 191 countries, most governments have been concerned with
38   IV,    11.  1.  4|         to healthcare~ ~European governments are concerned with pursuing
39   IV,    11.  1.  5|       the recent years have seen governments increasingly focusing attention
40   IV,    11.  2.  2|  enterprises.~ ~Several European governments have moved mental health
41   IV,    11.  3.  1|          by central and regional governments or professional bodies.
42   IV,    11.  3.  2|     objectives. On the one hand, governments want to secure health policy
43   IV,    11.  3.  2|          the industry to thrive. Governments choose a mix of different
44   IV,    11.  3.  2|        of the primary mechanisms governments use to control pharmaceutical
45   IV,    11.  3.  2|      demand elasticity - or that governments purchase patents and release
46   IV,    11.  6.  2|  payments is that they undermine governmentsefforts to improve accountability
47   IV,    11.  6.  4|      adjustment is that regional governments and health insurance funds
48   IV,    11.  6.  4|          and Regions~21 regional governments~Age, sex, mortality (one
49   IV,    11.  6.  4|   Purpose Grant Scheme~19 county governments (geographically based)~Mortality,
50   IV,    11.  6.  4|    passed by central or regional governments, decrees by central or regional
51   IV,    11.  6.  4|   decrees by central or regional governments, directives by self-governing
52   IV,    12.  2    |          in 1989, Member Statesgovernments have developed their own
53   IV,    12.  2    |        outlined an approach that governments can adopt to prevent tens
54   IV,    12.  2    |         report also reveals that governments around the world collect
55   IV,    12.  2    |         179 Member States, gives governments and other groups a baseline
56   IV,    12.  2    |       decisions that are made by governments through laws, rules and
57   IV,    12. 10    |   central State and the regional Governments (Intesa Stato-Regioni 23.
58   IV,    12. 10    |   central State and the regional Governments (Intesa Stato-Regioni 23.
59   IV,    12. 10    |       Act on Restructuring Local Governments and Services came to force
60   IV,    13.  7.  5|       enabling linkage will help governments to develop efficient and