Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2. 10.  1|     nutrient/water use efficiency, resistance to biotic/abiotic stresses
 2    I,     2. 10.  2|           electrical conduction or resistance, a high capacity for storing
 3   II,     5.  1.  1|          lead to increased insulin resistance and diabetes. Chronic pancreatitis
 4   II,     5.  4.  1|           characterised by insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency.
 5   II,     5.  4.  5|          lead to increased insulin resistance and diabetes. Chronic pancreatitis
 6   II,     5. 11.  3|     surface and which have lack of resistance to sweat corrosion are able
 7   II,     5. 11.  3|           with an higher corrosion resistance and also a non-toxicity
 8   II,     6.Acr    |       Acronyms~ ~AMR~Antimicrobial Resistance~BSE~Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy~
 9   II,     6.Acr    |            Venereum~MDR~Multi-Drug Resistance~MMR vaccine~Measles, Mumps
10   II,     6.Acr    |            coli~XDR~Extensive Drug Resistance~YFV~Yellow Fever Virus~ ~
11   II,     6.  3.  2|               6.3.2. Antimicrobial resistance and healthcare-associated
12   II,     6.  3.  2| healthcare-associated infections~ ~Resistance to antibiotics is a large
13   II,     6.  3.  2|          problems of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and HCAI.~ ~
14   II,     6.  3.  2|             6.3.2.1. Antimicrobial resistance and antibiotic consumption~ ~
15   II,     6.  3.  2|     against infectious diseases.~ ~Resistance has also evolved against
16   II,     6.  3.  2|            to follow the trends of resistance patterns is that the methodology
17   II,     6.  3.  2|           countries and increasing resistance to penicillin and other
18   II,     6.  3.  2|       other antibiotics elsewhere. Resistance is mainly confined to a
19   II,     6.  3.  2|            rifampicin, (multi-drug resistance, MDR), as well as to other
20   II,     6.  3.  2|        antibiotics (extensive drug resistance, XDR), poses a serious challenge
21   II,     6.  3.  2|            in surveillance of drug resistance is needed to ensure a better
22   II,     6.  3.  2|       reason for the low levels of resistance to the newer antibiotics
23   II,     6.  3.  2|            antibiotic classes, and resistance to these classes has been
24   II,     6.  3.  2|      levels:~· following trends of resistance in major important pathogens;~·
25   II,     6.  3.  4|           section on antimicrobial resistance, above).~ ~ ~In the early ’
26   II,     6.  3.  4|         and high frequency of drug resistance and where HIV is low but
27   II,     6.  3.  4|         and levels of HIV and drug resistance low.~ ~ ~In 2005, the 25
28   II,     6.  3.  4|            on risk groups and drug resistance and to better link laboratory
29   II,     6.  3.  6|           monitoring of antibiotic resistance is important and should
30   II,     6.  3.  6|  information, including antibiotic resistance where appropriate) is therefore
31   II,     6.  4.  5|               6.4.5. Antimicrobial resistance.~ ~A Council Recommendation (
32   II,     6.  4.  5|           to control antimicrobial resistance comprises actions in four
33   II,     6.  4.  5|         with the aim of monitoring resistance to antimicrobial agents
34   II,     6.  4.  5|           contain genes expressing resistance to antibiotics;~ ~· research
35   II,     6.  4.  5|         spreading of antimicrobial resistance, development of new means
36   II,     9.  5.  4|     attitudes to gender issues and resistance to the introduction of gender
37  III,    10.  2.  1| dyslipidaemia and impaired insulin resistance; this problem affects 20–
38  III,    10.  2.  1|          building, weight bearing, resistance exercise are required to
39  III,    10.  2.  1|          growth in children, lower resistance to infections and decreased
40  III,    10.  3.  3|            impact of antimicrobial resistance. Biological stressors are
41  III,    10.  3.  3|           analysis~ ~Antimicrobial resistance (AMR)~ ~The bacterium that
42  III,    10.  3.  3|           pneumococcal infections. Resistance has also evolved against
43  III,    10.  4.  2|            zoonoses, antimicrobial resistance, microbiological contaminants
44  III,    10.  4.  2|            zoonoses, antimicrobial resistance and food-borne outbreaks
45  III,    10.  4.  2|          Anisakis;~• antimicrobial resistance;~• transmissible spongiform
46  III,    10.  4.  2|        outbreaks and antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella and Campylobacter
47  III,    10.  4.  2|           and pig meats~Antibiotic resistance of Campylobacter and Salmonella
48  III,    10.  4.  2|     zoonotic agents, antimicrobial resistance and food-borne outbreaks
49  III,    10.  4.  2|            animals and food showed resistance to antimicrobials commonly
50  III,    10.  4.  2|            especially the case for resistance to fluoroquinolones in Campylobacter
51  III,    10.  4.  2|    Residues in meat~Development of~resistance by (possible) monitoring
52  III,    10.  4.  2|            new property (a plant’s resistance to a disease or insect,
53  III,    10.  4.  2|     zoonotic agents, antimicrobial resistance nad food borne outbreaks
54  III,    10.  4.  3|         spreading of anti-biotical resistance, is another important early
55   IV,    11.  6.  2|            taxes may reduce public resistance to taxation because it is
56   IV,    11.  6.  2|           response to considerable resistance. Supplementary insurance
57   IV,    12.  4    |   anti-virals and on antimicrobial resistance, on the evaluation of new
58   IV,    12.  5    |          in relation to antibiotic resistance and nosocomial infections.~
59  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|          residential care~residues~resistance~resolution~respiratory~retardants~